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From conflue...@apache.org
Subject [CONF] Apache Tuscany Docs 2.x > 2.0-beta-Samples documentation
Date Mon, 08 Nov 2010 07:35:00 GMT
Space: Apache Tuscany Docs 2.x (https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/TUSCANYxDOCx2x)
Page: 2.0-beta-Samples documentation (https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/TUSCANYxDOCx2x/2.0-beta-Samples+documentation)


Edited by Brent Daniel:
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 

h1. {color:#003366}{*}Tuscany Samples{*}{color}

{color:#000000}The Tuscany Samples are shipped with Tuscany binary and source releases. If
you are using Tuscany from a release distribution then make sure you are looking at the documentation
that corresponds to the samples as they stood at the time of the release.{color} 

The contents of the [Samples] page contains the very latest documentation for the samples
in trunk.

In a distribution, the samples source code is found in the samples directory, directly under
the root directory. The following sections are laid out to match the structure of the samples
directory and its subdirectories.

If you're new to Tuscany SCA start with the getting-started. Samples are generally presented
in the form on an SCA contribution (look for directories ending in "-contribution") or as
a webapp (look for directories ending in "-webapp"). The directories getting-started, learning-more
and applications all contain sample SCA contributions of increasing complexity. The running-tuscany
directory describes the various ways you can start the Tuscany runtime and install contributions.
For each sample contribution described in this document we do suggest an example way to install
it and start the composites it contains however the other approaches in running-tuscany should
also work for most sample contributions. The extending-tuscany directory contains some examples
of how to build new binding and implementation extensions for using in Tuscany.

In the following text we us <some_text> to mean you have to replace it with whatever
is appropriate in your environment. For example <tuscany_bin_distro> means the directory
in which you install the Tuscany binary distribution.

Instructions are colour coded as follows:

{panel:bgColor=pink}
Instructions in pink boxes are for the Ant user
{panel}
{panel:bgColor=silver}
Instructions in silver boxes are for the Maven user
{panel}

Note. As some of these samples create and use local network connections you may need to configure
your firewall, if you are running one, to allow the test to run successfully. 

{toc:outline=true|minLevel=2}

h2. getting-started

SCA defines a concept called a Contribution which is the way that SCA composite applications
are packed for deployment. See [sca introduction] for more information on SCA concepts.

The getting-started samples consist of simple SCA contributions that you can build and run
as your first step to getting up and running with the Tuscany SCA Java runtime.

You can build the sample contributions with either Maven or Ant and the running-tuscany directory
contains information about the various ways you can start Tuscany and run these contributions.

h3. helloworld-contribution

This is a simple SCA contribution. It describes a composite application with a single component,
HelloWorldComponent, implemented in Java. The component's Java implementation provides service
"business logic" for saying hello to a person whose name is supplied as input to the service.
The component is described in a composite called helloworld.composite as follows:

{code}
<composite xmlns="http://docs.oasis-open.org/ns/opencsa/sca/200912"
           xmlns:tuscany="http://tuscany.apache.org/xmlns/sca/1.1"
           targetNamespace="http://sample"
           name="helloworld">

    <component name="HelloworldComponent">
        <implementation.java class="sample.HelloworldImpl"/>
    </component>

</composite>
{code}

The contribution also contains a composite called helloworldws.composite which describes a
component, HelloworldWSComponent, that uses the same implementation but uses a web services
binding:

{code}
<composite xmlns="http://docs.oasis-open.org/ns/opencsa/sca/200912"
           xmlns:tuscany="http://tuscany.apache.org/xmlns/sca/1.1"
           targetNamespace="http://sample"
           name="helloworldws">

    <component name="HelloworldWSComponent">
        <implementation.java class="sample.HelloworldImpl"/>
        <service name="Helloworld">
           <binding.ws />
        </service>
    </component>

</composite>
{code}

This gives us a number of options for interacting with the components in this application.


Firstly there is a JUnit test inside this project called HelloworldTestCase.java. This starts
the Tuscany runtime and loads the contribution. It then talks to the HelloworldComponent over
the default SCA binding (binding.sca) using a local Java proxy.

Secondly the HelloworldWSComponent exposes a service with a web services binding. You can
talk to this component using your favourite web services client. You can retrieve the WSDL
for the web service automatically (see later)

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To build this contribution using Ant do the following:

TODO
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
To build this contribution using Maven do the following:

{code}
cd helloworld-contribution
mvn
{code}

{panel}

This will produce the contribution as follows:

{code}
helloworld-contribution/target/helloworld-contribution.jar
{code}

As the JUnit test deploys and runs the contribution we can use it as a first simple example
of a running SCA application. 

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To run the JUnit test using Ant do the following:

TODO
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution will be run automatically during the Maven build step and you will see the
output from the JUnit test printed on the console in amongst the other output:

{code}
Response from helloworld.sayHello("Petra") = Hello Petra
{code}
{panel}

To access the web service that the HelloworldWSComponent exposes we have to keep the runtime
runntime running. 

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To run the sample Ant so that you can access the web service do the following:

TODO
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
We have a Maven plugin that will run SCA contributions. You use it in Maven as follows:

{code}
cd helloworld-contribution
mvn tuscany:run
{code}

You will note that in the console output you can see a web service being exposed by the binding.ws
JAXWS provider:

{code}
Binding.ws JAXWS provider - Service URI: http://localhost:8085/HelloworldWSComponent/Helloworld
{code}

If you point you web browser at this address and add ?wsdl on the end:

{code}
http://localhost:8085/HelloworldWSComponent/Helloworld?wsdl
{code}

You'll see the WSDL for the service returned. Using you're favourite web services client,
for example, the Web Services Explorer in Eclipse, you can send messages to this web service.


When you're done use CTRL-C to stop the sample. 
{panel}

For more information on getting started with the Apache Tuscany SCA Java runtime see the [getting
started] page.

h3. helloworld-webapp

This sample is not a contribution in it's own right but demonstrates how to run the helloworld-contribution
inside a web application. As it's the same contribution the same two components, HelloworldComponent
and HelloworldWSComponnet, will be started. 

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To build this contribution using Ant do the following:

TODO
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
To build this contribution using Maven do the following:

{code}
cd helloworld-webapp
mvn
{code}
{panel}

This will produce a webapp as follows:

{code}
helloworld-webapp/target/helloworld.war
{code}


You can run this webapp by deploying it to you're favourite webapp container. For example,
you can deploy to Tomcat and run as follows:
{code}
cp helloworld-webapp/target/helloworld.war my_tomcat_install/webapps
my_tomcat_install/bin/catalina run
{code}

Once running point your web browser at:

{code}
http://localhost:8080/helloworld/hello.html
{code}

You'll see a link there to the WSDL that's automatically generated for the web service binding
of the HelloworldWSComponent. Again you can use your favourite web services client to send
messages to the service. 

{note:title=TODO}
There is no example of accessing binding.sca from within the webapp. Do we want to include
this?
{note}

{note:title=TODO}
For more information on creating webapps to run SCA contributions with Tuscany see - ?
{note}

h3. callback-api
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}This feels like a learning-more sample. I wouldn't focus on callbacks with
the first time user{color}
{note}

h3. sca-scopes
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}This feels like a learning-more sample. I wouldn't focus on scopes with the
first time user{color}
{note}

h3. sca-include-contribution
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}This feels like a learning-more sample. I wouldn't focus on inclusion with
the first time user{color}
{note}

h2. running-tuscany

Running something in Tuscany requires one or more contributions, and a method of launching
the contributions to make the services they provide available. The sections below describes
various means of launching contributions with the Tuscany SCA Java runtime. It's not important
that you try all of these but they show you what's possible and hopefully show you how to
use Tuscany in an environment that makes sense to you.

Some of the running-tuscany sub-directories just contain a README that gives you instructions.
For example, maven just tells you how to configure and run contributions using the maven-tuscany-plugin.
Others contain code. For example, embedded-jse contains simple Java launchers that show you
how to start some of the sample contributions from a Java program.

The sample contributions in getting-started and learning-more should work regardless of which
approach you adopt. However some approaches, like embedded-jse, don't have launchers for every
single sample contribution.

h3. command-line

You can execute a sample contribution from the command line on Windows or Linux.

{note:title=TODO}
Waiting for tuscany.bat to be reworked before correcting
{note}

To execute a sample contribution from the command line

on Windows, from a command prompt in the samples directory, run the command ...

{code}
<tuscany_din_distro>\bin\tuscany.bat "contribution-name"
{code}

for example

{code}
cd <tuscany_din_distro>\samples\learning-more\binding-sca\calculator-contribution
<tuscany_din_distro>\bin\tuscany.bat sample-binding-sca-calculator-contribution.jar
{code}

or on \*nix platforms, from a shell prompt in the samples directory, run the command ...

{code}
cd <tuscany_din_distro>/samples/learning-more/binding-sca/calculator-contribution
<tuscany_din_distro>/bin/tuscany.sh sample-binding-sca-calculator-contribution.jar
{code}

h3. eclipse

To import sample contributions into Eclipse you first need to import the Tuscany runtime.
You then need to import the sample contribution into Eclipse as a project. Instructions for
doing both of these things can be found here

[http://tuscany.apache.org/import-existing-tuscany-sca-projects-into-eclipse.html]



Note. these instructions refer to our 1.x code base but it holds true for our 2.x code base.

Once you have a contribution imported into Eclipse and cleanly compiling against the Tuscany
runtime jars you probably want to be able to run and debug it. The easiest way to do this
is with a simple Java launcher. If you import the running-tuscany/embedded-jse project into
Eclipse you'll see a number of such launcher programs which you can copy to launch the contribution(s)
of your choice. Alternatively you can add a JUnit test case to the contribution that starts
Tuscany and launches the contribution. See maven-junit as an example of how to do this.

h3. embedded-jse

This directory contains sample java launchers for the some of the Tuscany sample contributions
from the learning-more directory. It shows you how to embed the Tuscany runtime in a Java
program. To make you're own launchers simply copy and existing one and change the details
of the contribution being loaded. You'll note that the same launcher code is used inside the
contribution unit test demonstrated by maven-junit.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To use the sample JSE launchers with ant execute the command
{code}
ant <contributionname>
{code}

where <contributionname> is one of the targets in the provided build.xml file
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
To use the sample JSE launchers from Maven do the following:

{code}
cd embedded-jse
mvn
{code}
This runs a JUnit test case that runs all the launchers in turn.
{panel}

h3. embedded-osgi

The Tuscany runtime jars will also work within an OSGi enviroment. If you want to load them
into a vanilla OSGi environment see the osgi directory. If you want Tuscany to create an OSGi
environment for you this directory contains launchers that do just that.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
To use the sample OSGI launchers with ant do the following:

{code}
cd embedded-osgi
ant <contributionname>
{code}

where <contributionname> is one of the targets in the build.xml file
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
To use the sample JSE launchers from Maven do the following:

{code}
cd embedded-osgi
mvn
{code}
This runs a JUnit test case that runs all the launchers in turn.
{panel}

h3. maven

Maven can be used to install contributions. Tuscany has a special plugin (maven-tuscany-plugin)
that makes this happen. Look for contributions that have the following configuration in their
pom.xml file:

{code}
<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.tuscany.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-tuscany-plugin</artifactId>
<version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
</plugin>
{code}

For contributions that have this, for example, learning-more/binding-sca/contribution-calculator,
do the following

cd samples/learning-more/binding-sca/contribution-calculator
mvn tuscany:run

This will install the contribution in the Tuscany runtime, start the composite it contains,
and then wait. At this point you can use
other clients to send messages to services that the running SCA applcation exposes, for example,
try learning-more/sca-client/calculator-scaclient.

h3. maven-junit

Maven will run JUnit tests found in a module's src/test/java directory automatically. If you
use embedded-jse style code in the JUnit test to install a contribution and start any composites
it contains they you can unit test your contributions. This directory contains a contribution
and a unit test which installs the contribution using very similar code to that found in embedded-jse.

To run the contributions unit test do the following:

{code}
cd maven-junit/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

h3. maven-junit-osgi

You can use a special Tuscany Maven plugin (maven-osgi-junit-plugin) to unit test contributions
in a JUnit environment. This relies on adding some configuration to the Maven pom.xml. For
example, if you look in maven-junit-osgi/calculator-osgi you'll see:

{code}
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.tuscany.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-osgi-junit-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>1.0</version>
                <dependencies>
                   <dependency>
                      <groupId>org.apache.tuscany.sca</groupId>
                      <artifactId>tuscany-node-launcher-equinox</artifactId>
                      <version>${pom.version}</version>
                   </dependency>
                </dependencies>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <id>osgi-test</id>
                        <phase>test</phase>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>test</goal>
                        </goals>
                        <configuration>
                            <systemProperties>
                                <property>
                                    <name>osgi.configuration.area</name>
                                    <value>${project.build.directory}/equinox</value>
                                </property>
                            </systemProperties>
                        </configuration>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin>
{code}

This configures the maven-osgi-junit-plugin to use the tuscany-node-launcher-equinox to install
the contribution represented by the calculator-osgi directory. As an alternative to this configuration
you could use the contents of tuscany-node-launcher-equinox directly in your JUnit test to
launch the Tuscany runtime using OSGi.

To run the contributions unit test do the following:

{code}
cd maven-junit/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

h3. osgi

The Tuscany runtime can be run in a vanilla OSGi container such as Equinox. To do this you
have to:

- launch the OSGi container itself
- load the Tuscany runtime bundles (all our jars are bundles) into the container
- install a contribution packaged as an OSGi bundle

For example, to install a contribution in Equinox do the following

On Windows, run

{code}
java -jar ..\..\..\modules\osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ..\..\..\features\configuration
-clean -console
{code}

On \*Unix, run

{code}
java -jar ../../../modules/osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ../../../features/configuration
-clean -console
{code}

You should see the osgi console:

{code}
osgi>

osgi> Jun 22, 2009 1:32:27 PM org.apache.tuscany.sca.extensibility.equinox.EquinoxServiceDiscoveryActivator
start

INFO: Equinox-based service discoverer is now configured.

{code}

You can run "ss" command under the osgi> to see the status of the bundles.

{code}
osgi> ss
{code}

Then you can install and start contributions as bundles by doing the following:

{code}
osgi> install file:./path/to/<contribution_bundle.jar>
{code}

Note that <contribution_bundle.jar> will need an activator in order to register the
bundle as a SCA contribution

Running on Felix

See [http://tuscany.apache.org/documentation-2x/running-tuscany-sca-2x-with-equinox-and-felix.html]


h3. shell

This directory contains a sample shell program supporting simple commands to start and stop
SCA composites.

{note:title=TODO}
We currently have two similar approaches available (see command-line). We need to merge the
two together.
{note}

To build the sample shell do this:
{code}
mvn install
{code}
To run it:
{code}
./sca
{code}

at the prompt:
{code}
start myNode ../../applications/store/target/sample-store.jar
{code}
or:
{code}
start myNode http://people.apache.org/~jsdelfino/tuscany/java/test/sample-store.jar
{code}
also try:
{code}
status
stop myNode
bye
{code}
Starting and stopping composites is pretty fast. To see that, try the following
two scripts, which start/stop the sample store composite 10 times.
{code}
./sca <scripts/test.txt
{code}
or
{code}
./sca <scripts/test-remote.txt
{code}

The shell can also run as a Webapp. To try it install target/scashell.war in
a Web container, point your Web browser to [http://localhost:8080/scashell]
and try the links on that page.

h3. webapp

Tuscany can be embedded inside a webapp alongside one or more SCA contributions. To execute
sample webapp based contributions (contributions that have webapp at the end of their name)
you can build the contribution using maven and then copy the resulting war file to your container
of choice

For example, for binding-jsonrpc/contribution-calculator-webapp, do the following:

{code}
cd samples/binding-jsonrpc/contribution-calculator-webapp
mvn
cp target/sample-contribution-binding-jsonrpc-calculator-webapp.war <your_container_deployment-dir>
{code}

As an alternative, sample webapp based contributions can be run within Jetty directly from
Maven, look for webapp contributions that have the following configuration in their pom.xml
file:

{code}
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.mortbay.jetty</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jetty-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>6.1.18</version>
</plugin>
{code}

For contributions that have this, for example, binding-jsonrpc/contribution-calculator-webapp,
do the following

{code}
cd samples/binding-sca/contribution-calculator
mvn jetty:run
{code}

This will launch the contribution in the Jetty runtime and then wait. At this point you can
use HTTP clients to send messages to services that the running SCA applcation exposes. For
this example try pointing your browser at:

{code}
http://localhost:8080/sample-binding-jsonrpc-calculator-webapp/
{code}

h2. learning-more

The samples found in the contributions below illustrate more of SCA and Tuscany's features
in action. The contributions here are primarily focused on demonstrating the various SCA extensions
that the Tuscany runtime supports, for example, bindings and implementations. The directories
are named to let you easily find a sample of the extension you're interested in.

You can identify contributions here as the name of the directory from which they are built
ends with "-contribution". There are also webapp samples here. The names of these directories
end with "-webapp".

Refer to the information above in the "running-tuscany" section to find the various options
for installing these sample contributions. We present an single default approach for each
sample as an example.

h3. async

This sample demonstrates the SCA asynchronous progamming model in action as typified by services
that are configured with the asyncInvocation intent. For example, from calculator-contribution

{code}
@Remotable
@AsyncInvocation
public interface CalculatorServiceAsync {
    void calculateAsync(Integer n1, ResponseDispatch<String> response);
}
{code}

A client component can access an asynchronous service either synchronously or asynchronously.
Asynchronous reference interfaces also have a special form, again from calculator-contribution:

{code}
@Remotable
public interface CalculateReferenceAsync {
	// Sync
	public String calculate(Integer i1);

	// Aysnc Poll
	public Response<String> calculateAsync(Integer i1);

	// Async Callback
	public Future<String> calculateAsync(Integer i1, AsyncHandler<String> handler);
}
{code}

h4. calculator-contribution

This contribution defines synchronous and asynchronous component services and a client component
which references both. During the test the client component exercise all three styles of reference
interface operation against both the synchronous and asynchronous service.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/async/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-implementation-java-calculator-async-contribution
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/async/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the sample-implementation-java-calculator-async-contribution.
{panel}

h3. binding-comet

The Comet protocol allows a servlet to process IO asynchronously, receiving events when data
is available for reading on the connection (rather than always using a blocking read), and
writing data back on connections asynchronously (most likely responding to some event raised
from some other source).

h4. weather-webapp

Executing the command "mvn" in this sample project creates a web archive suitable for deployment
to Tomcat.  It makes use of the tuscany comet binding.

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The webapp can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-commet/weather-webapp
mvn
{code}
{panel}

The webapp can be installed and run as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-commet/weather-webapp
cp target/sample-binding-comet-1.0.war <your_container_deployment-dir>
start the container as appropriate
{code}

h3. binding-jms

This binding supports message orient communication via the JMS API.

h4. helloworld-webapp

This contribution packages an SCA application inside a webapp. The application has two components
which exchange helloworld style messages over the JMS binding. 

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The webapp can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jms/helloworld-webapp
mvn
{code}
{panel}

The webapp can be installed and run as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jms/helloworld-webapp
cp target/helloworld-jms.war <your_container_deployment-dir>
start the container as appropriate
{code}

{warning:title=TODO}
By rights the webapp should be called sample-binding-jms-helloworld-webapp.war
{warning}

Once the webapp is deployed point your browser at:

{code}
http://localhost:8080/helloworld-jms/
{code}

h3. binding-jsonrpc

This binding supports communication over the JSON-RPC protocol.

h4. calculator-contribution

This sample demonstrates using the simple calculator service component which makes use of
four other services for add, subtract, multiply and divide functions. In this variant of the
calculator sample the AddService is configured to be invoked using the JSON-RPC protocol.
You can see the configuration by looking in the src/main/resources/Calculator.composite xml
file.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jsonrpc/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-implementation-java-calculator-async-contribution
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jsonrpc/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the sample-implementation-java-calculator-async-contribution.
{panel}

h4. calculator-webapp

This contribution packages the same calculator-contribution inside a webapp. 

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The webapp can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jsonrpc/calculator-webapp
mvn
{code}
{panel}

The webapp can be installed and run as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-jsonrpc/calculator-webapp
cp target/sample-binding-jsonrpc-calculator-webapp.war <your_container_deployment-dir>
start the container as appropriate
{code}

Once the webapp is deployed point your browser at:

{code}
http://localhost:8080/sample-binding-jsonrpc-calculator-webapp/
{code}

h3. binding-rmi

In this example the calculator function is split over two contributions in order to demonstrate
the remote method invocation binding (binding.rmi). The calculator-service-contribution contains
a composite which defines a CalculatorServiceComponent which exposes a CalculatorService using
binding.rmi. The calculator-reference-contribution contains a composite which also defines
a CalculatorServiceComponent but which in this case calls the add, subtract, multiple and
divide operations offered by the component in the calculator-service-contribution. The two
contributions are run using separate Tuscany nodes and the resulting components communicate
over RMI. Both contributions must be deployed and started for the sample to work;

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contributions can be installed and the composite they contain run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-binding-rmi-calculator-contribution
{code}
{panel} 

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contributions can be installed and the composite they contain run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the binding-rmi sample contributions
{panel}

h4. calculator-service-contribution

This contribution defines a CalculatorServiceComponent whose add, subtract, multiply and divide
operations are available over RMI. 

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-rmi/calculator-service-contribution
ant
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-rmi/calculator-service-contribution
mvn
{code}
{panel}


h4. calculator-reference-contribution

This sample extends the calculator sample by replacing the local wired  connections with RMI
bindings. Instead of local add, subtract, multiply and  divide components, an RMI service
implementation now provides the add, subtract, multiply and divide interfaces and is hosted
as an RMI server. References specified in the .composite file include an RMI binding which
targets
this RMI server.



{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-rmi/calculator-reference-contribution
ant
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-rmi/calculator-reference-contribution
mvn
{code}
{panel}

h3. binding-sca

This sample is the simplest sample other than that shown in the getting starting section.
It uses the default SCA protocol for communicating between the various components of the caluclator
application.

h4. calculator-contribution
The service and reference definitions in the Calculator.composite and CalculatorClient.composite
files have no binding attributes, thereby defaulting to the SCA binding for communication
between the running instances of the components.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-sca/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-binding-sca-calculator-contribution
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-sca/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the sample-binding-sca-calculator-contribution.
{panel}

h3. binding-ws

The web service binding allows components to expose and call services using SOAP formatted
messages primarily over HTTP. 

h4. calculator-contribution

This contribution provides the four arithmetic operations in the calculator service, with
the AddService being accessible as a web service via the URL http://localhost:8085/AddServiceComponent,
as configured in the Calculator.composite file.

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-ws/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-binding-ws-calculator-contribution
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/binding-ws/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the sample-binding-sca-calculator-contribution.
{panel}

h4. contribution-helloworld-ws-sdo

This sample demonstrates an SCA reference that uses a web service binding which works with
SDO. Instead if using JAXB style Java beans in the service interface they are replaced with
SDO object. 

{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Sample not currently enabled - awaiting SDO support{color}
{note}

h3. distributed-osgi

These samples demonstrate the execution of Tuscany contributions in a OSGI environment. In
particular the two bundle project in this directory define calculator objects that communicate
with one another using the mechanisms defined in the OSGi remote services specifications.
Here the Tuscany SCA runtime provides dynamic service discovery functionality. The calculator
objects are registered as services directly with the OSGi bundle context by the bundle activator.
Under the covers SCA provides the remote service disovery features that allow OSGi registered
service to discover and communicate with one another across two JVMs. 

To run the sample each bundle must be build using maven and then loaded into a separate OSGi
environment into which the Tuscany SCA runtime has already been installed (See "osgi" under
running-tuscany)

h4. dosgi-dynamic-calculator-operations

This bundle provides the calculator add, subtract, multiple, divide operations services.

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/distributed-osgi/dosgi-dynamic-calculator-operations
mvn
{code}
{panel}

{note:title=TODO}
projects should be called dosgi-dynamic-calculator-operations-bundle
{note}

To run the bundle see "osgi" under running-tuscany. In short do the following:

On Windows, run

{code}
java -jar ..\..\..\..\modules\osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ..\..\..\..\features\configuration
-clean -console
{code}

You should see the osgi console. You can run "ss" command under the osgi> to see the status
of the bundles.

{code}
osgi> ss
{code}

Then you can install and start the bundle that's just been built:

{code}
osgi> install file:./target/sample-dosgi-dynamic-calculator-operations.jar
{code}

h4. dosgi-dynamic-calculator

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/distributed-osgi/dosgi-dynamic-calculator
mvn
{code}
{panel}

{note:title=TODO}
projects should be called dosgi-dynamic-calculator-bundle
{note}

To run the bundle see "osgi" under running-tuscany. In short do the following:

On Windows, run

{code}
java -jar ..\..\..\..\modules\osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ..\..\..\..\features\configuration
-clean -console
{code}

You should see the osgi console. You can run "ss" command under the osgi> to see the status
of the bundles.

{code}
osgi> ss
{code}

Then you can install and start the bundle that's just been built:

{code}
osgi> install file:./target/sample-dosgi-dynamic-calculator.jar
{code}

You should see the calculator service start. 


h3. implementation-bpel

BPEL component implementations will be useful to those who wish to describe a sequence of
calls that must be made to other component services. 

h4. contribution-helloworld-bpel

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-bpel/helloworld-bpel-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
????
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-bpel/helloworld-bpel-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
????
{code}

{panel}

h4. helloworld-bpel-webapp

h3. implementation-composite
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h4. helloworld-recursive

{note:title=TODO}Understand and Document{note}

h4. helloworld-recursive-ws

{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h3. implementation-java
The sample provides a single calculator service with a default SCA binding. The CalculatorClient
exercises this interface by calling add, subtract, multiply and divide operations. This results
in messages passing to the appropriate components in the composite across the local wires.

h4. contribution-calculator
{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-java/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
ant sample-implementation-java-calculator-contribution
{code}
{panel}

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The contribution Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-java/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Maven as follows

{code}
cd running-tuscany/embedded-jse
mvn
{code}

This will run several contributions including the sample-implementation-java-calculator-contribution.
{panel}


h3. implementation.osgi

h4. dosgi-calculator

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-osgi/dosgi-calculator
mvn
{code}
{panel}

{note:title=TODO}
projects should be called dosgi-calculator-bundle
{note}

To run the bundle see "osgi" under running-tuscany. In short do the following:

On Windows, run

{code}
java -jar ..\..\..\..\modules\osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ..\..\..\..\features\configuration
-clean -console
{code}

You should see the osgi console. You can run "ss" command under the osgi> to see the status
of the bundles.

{code}
osgi> ss
{code}

Then you can install and start the bundle that's just been built:

{code}
osgi> install file:./target/sample-dosgi-calculator.jar
{code}

You should see the calculator service start. 



h4. dosgi-calculator-operations
This bundle provides the calculator add, subtract, multiple, divide operations services.

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/distributed-osgi/dosgi-calculator-operations
mvn
{code}
{panel}

{note:title=TODO}
projects should be called dosgi-calculator-operations-bundle
{note}

To run the bundle see "osgi" under running-tuscany. In short do the following:

On Windows, run

{code}
java -jar ..\..\..\..\modules\osgi-3.5.0-v20090520.jar -configuration ..\..\..\..\features\configuration
-clean -console
{code}

You should see the osgi console. You can run "ss" command under the osgi> to see the status
of the bundles.

{code}
osgi> ss
{code}

Then you can install and start the bundle that's just been built:

{code}
osgi> install file:./target/sample-dosgi-calculator-operations.jar
{code}

h3. implementation-script

This sample provides a simple calculator service whose operations are implemented using four
different script languages. 

h4. contribution-calculator

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-script/calculator-contribution
mvn
{code}

{panel}

{panel:bgColor=pink}
The contribution Jar can be built using Ant as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-script/calculator-contribution
ant
{code}

The contribution can be installed and the composite it contains run using Ant as follows:

{code}
????
{code}
{panel}

h3. implementation-spring

The Spring implementation sample contains a simple Hello World service and client using implementation.spring.


h4. contribution-helloworld-spring

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-spring/helloworld-spring-contribution
mvn
{code}

{panel}


h4. helloworld-spring-webapp

The HelloWorld Spring WebApp sample contains a simple Hello World service implemented using
Spring and wrapped in a webApp. 

{panel:bgColor=silver}
The bundle Jar can be built using Maven as follows:

{code}
cd learning-more/implementation-spring/helloworld-spring-webapp
mvn
{code}

{panel}

h3. implementation-web

The Web implementation samples contain examples of a HelloWorld service implemented using
implementation.web and accessed with various different technologies. 

h4. helloworld-jaxrs-webapp

The HelloWorld JAX-RS WebApp sample uses implementation.web with JAX-RS to display a simple
"Hello World" message from a webapp. 

h4. helloworld-js-client-webapp

The HelloWorld JavaScript client Webapp sample uses implementation.web and a javascript client
to call a simple "Hello World" service and display the results. 

h4. helloworld-jsf-webapp
The HelloWorld JSF WebApp sample shows a simple "Hello World" service implemented in a webapp
and accessed using Java Server Faces. 

h4. helloworld-jsp-webapp
The HelloWorld JSP WebApp sample uses implementation.web and a JSP client to invoke a simple
"Hello World" service and display the results. 

h4. helloworld-servlet-webapp

The HelloWorld Servlet WebApp sample uses implementation.web with a servlet to return a simple
"Hello World" message in response to a request.

h4. helloworld-stripes-webapp
The HelloWorld Stripes WebApp sample uses implementation.web with Stripes to display a simple
"Hello World" message from a webapp. 

h3. logging-scribe

This Tuscany sample shows how to implement and use a simple Logger component that logs string
messages to a Scribe logging server. 

Scribe is an open source server for aggregating streaming log data. It is designed to scale
to a very large number of nodes and be robust to network and node failures.

See the Scribe Wiki [1] for more information on Scribe.

h4. Getting the requires Apache Thrift library

This sample uses Apache Thrift's libthrift.jar to communicate with Scribe servers. Libthrift
is not yet available in a Maven repository, so before building the sample with maven you need
to download libthrift [2] and install it in your local maven repository like this:

{code}
mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=org.apache.thrift -DartifactId=libthrift -Dversion=1.0-SNAPSHOT
-Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=libthrift-r917130.jar
{code}

h4. Starting a Scribe server
Before running the LoggingTest sample test program, you need to start a Scribe server for
the sample program to connect to.

Steps to start a Scribe server are described in the Scribe examples README [3]. A simple scribe
server configuration can be found in the Scribe examples [4]. 

LoggingTest will try to connect to a Scribe server at localhost:1463. To use a Scribe server
at a different host or port, configure the host and port properties in scribe.composite to
match your server. 

h4. Running the LoggingTest sample test program

To run the LoggingTest sample test program, do this:
{code}
mvn -Dtest=LoggingTest test
{code}

h4. Checking the Scribe log output
After running LoggingTest, you should find the logged string "Hello There" in file sample/sample_current
under your Scribe log store directory.

If you've used the example1.conf Scribe configuration from the Scribe examples [4], you should
find your log message in /tmp/scribetest/sample/sample_current.

[1] http://wiki.github.com/facebook/scribe/
[2] http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/cassandra/trunk/lib/libthrift-r917130.jar
[3] http://github.com/facebook/scribe/blob/master/examples/README
[4] http://github.com/facebook/scribe/blob/master/examples/example1.conf


h3. maven-osgi-junit
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h4. calculator-osgi
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h4. calculator-rest-osgi
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h3. sca-client

Samples that demonstrate the OASIS defined SCA Client API being used in simple Java applications
to access SCA components running in the domain.

h4. calculator-scaclient

Disabled in this Beta1 release pending some up-coming changes in 
the way that domains are addressed and accessed.

h4. helloworld-scaclient

Disabled in this Beta1 release pending some up-coming changes in 
the way that domains are addressed and accessed.

h2. extending-tuscany

h3. binding-extension
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h3. implementation-extension
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h2. applications
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h3. store
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

h3. store-webapp
{note:title=TODO}
{color:#000000}Understand and Document{color}
{note}

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