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From Claus Kick <claus.k...@googlemail.com>
Subject Re: Catch a Character ...
Date Tue, 29 Sep 2009 15:22:16 GMT
2009/9/22 Michael Ludwig <mlu@as-guides.com>

> Claus Kick schrieb:
>
>> 2009/9/21 Michael Ludwig <mlu@as-guides.com>
>>
>>> Claus Kick schrieb:
>>>
>>>  <xsl:param name="specChar" select="'\u201C'" />
>>>>
>>>>  That's the Java syntax. Doesn't work in XML. Use a numerical
>>> character reference as per the XML spec.
>>>
>>>  <xsl:param name="specChar" select="'&#x201C;'" /> in hex, or
>>>  <xsl:param name="specChar" select="'&#8220;'" /> in decimal
>>>
>>
>> OK, I completely forgot about that. That actually was the issue ...
>>
>
> Good! (BTW, this list doesn't set the Reply-To header to the list,
> which I think it should really do.)
>
>  Ok, thank you so much for your pointers, I have actually quite a few
>> transformations to work on, so this will indeed help me deepening my
>> knowledge!
>>
>
> Okay then, here are some more pointers :-) It helps to get familiarized
> with the weird XML and XSLT terminology. As for XML:
>
> * numerical character reference - as above
> * entity reference - &lt; (built-in), &myEnt; (user-defined) - same
>  syntax, but not exactly the same thing
> * entities (XML/DTD)
>  * general entity
>    * external [general] parsed entity (EGPE)
>    * external [general] unparsed entity
>  * parameter entity
> * internal subset (DTD)
> * external subset (DTD)
>
> You can read up on those in the XML recommendation (specification). The
> terminology is a bit weird. The thing to keep in mind is that the stuff
> is easier than the terminology. As for XSLT:
>
> * attribute value template (AVT)
> * result tree fragment (RTF)
> * node set
> * literal result element
> * match pattern
> * node test
>
> See this page [1] on Dave Pawson's site, which is a great resource for
> XSLT. Also, see Jeni Tennison's site [2], which has very nice tutorials.
> Also, see a recent thread on XSL-List [3] for more pointers.
>
> Finally, Xalan is a 1.0 processor. XSLT 2.0 is much more powerful than
> 1.0. Personally, I find it quite okay to get started with 1.0, which is
> a much smaller language, and therefore easier to learn. But 1.0 has its
> limits, and when reaching those, it's good to know about (a) EXSLT [4],
> (b) extension functions (for example, JavaScript in Xalan), (c) the
> possibility to upgrade to 2.0 by switching to Saxon.
>
> [1] http://www.dpawson.co.uk/xsl/xslvocab.html
> [2] http://www.jenitennison.com/xslt/
> [3] http://markmail.org/thread/myu2h7quwbh4rjdi - How did you learn XSL?
> [4] http://exslt.org/
>
>
Hello Michael,

thanks for reminding me (yet again - sigh) to include the group.

Thanks for your help - regarding Xalan or not: We have Xalan in use in a
huge amount of different places (data storage/exchange platform) and I
currently dread to even think about switching.
Currently, there is simply no way I could ensure that no breakage happens.

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