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From Scott_B...@lotus.com
Subject Re: Why Java?
Date Mon, 14 May 2001 03:34:35 GMT

> Why are most XML tools written in Java?

1) XML is still a developing technology.  Java tends to be less expensive
to experiment with, and XML still requires lots of experementation.

2) The development curve is different: in Java you spend less time getting
an initial implementation working, then spend a hell of a long time
optimizing it;  In C++ it can take you much longer for the initial
development and debugging, but then you have to spend less time optimizing
it, and have many more options for that optimization.

3) XML tends to encourage loosly coupled, pluggable components, which Java
lends itself to much easier than C++.

4) A lot of server-side stuff is being done in Java, and XML fits in well
into that framework.

5) Java tends to be much more portable, so, development and QE tends to be
cheaper.

6) Both IBM and Sun are XML advocates and also Java advocates.

7) There are lots of XML C++ tools, including Xalan and Xerces.

8) Dynamic languages are the wave of the future, even beyond Java (just ask
Microsoft with their Common Language Runtime).

> Even Saxon, which was one of the first XSLT libraries, was written in
Java.

LotusXSL which become Xalan, was out long before Saxon.  :-)

> but I believe C/C++ are still more common in Industry than Java

It depends on what part of the industry you're looking at.  For Web servers
and IS shops, I would probably argue with your conclusions about this.  On
the other hand, I don't spend a lot of time looking at industry statistics.

> Assuming the primary reasoning is portability, aren't command-line and
server programs written in C extremely portable?

I don't think they compare to Java in this respect.

-scott




                                                                                         
                           
                    Shawn Hempel                                                         
                           
                    <hempels@zOrego        To:     general@xml.apache.org             
                              
                    nTech.com>             cc:     (bcc: Scott Boag/CAM/Lotus)        
                              
                                           Subject:     Why Java?                        
                           
                    05/11/2001                                                           
                           
                    07:29 PM                                                             
                           
                    Please respond                                                       
                           
                    to general                                                           
                           
                                                                                         
                           
                                                                                         
                           




As a Software Engineering student at Oregon Institute of Technology I am
currently taking a course on XML. As part of the course I am trying to
(independently) learn some of the tools built around XML (Xalan, FOP,
Cocoon, etc).


I have a very open question, which will likely get me in trouble with some
Java die-hards, but I am really curious so I will ask anyway:
     Why are most XML tools written in Java?



Obviously some tools have been written in C, and some have been developed
with both Java and C implementations (Xerces), but my experience is that
the Java tools are more mature and more widely used. Even Saxon, which was
one of the first XSLT libraries, was written in Java.


It's not that I am opposed to Java, but I believe C/C++ are still more
common in Industry than Java and are, therefore, easier to use for many XML
developers?


Assuming the primary reasoning is portability, aren't command-line and
server programs written in C extremely portable? I think the Apache Server
itself is a great example of that.



Thanks for your feedback,


Shawn Hempel
hempels@zOregonTech.com








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