tomcat-users mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From "Ross, Scott" <scott.r...@ag.state.nj.us>
Subject RE: web application - student need help
Date Mon, 08 Jan 2007 16:23:58 GMT
Tracy Nelson.
Out of curiosity, can you point to some articles relating to the growing
pains you mentioned regarding Slashdot, Granddaddy and MySpace?

Thanks
Scott Ross

-----Original Message-----
From: Nelson, Tracy M. [mailto:Tracy.Nelson@nelnet.net] 
Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 11:01 AM
To: Tomcat Users List
Subject: RE: web application - student need help

| From: Michael Ni [mailto:mikeni123@hotmail.com]
| Sent: Friday, 05 January, 2007 16:38
| 
| even with connection pooling, how many connections are we looking at
here?
| if my project works as intended, im predicting from 30 to 1000 poeple 
| simultaneously hitting tomcat and sql server.

If you're just on a cable modem, I wouldn't worry about it.  Your
network bandwidth will give our before your connection limit.
 
| i remember when websites like friendster.com came out, it was really
slow.
| now it is much faster, do you guys know where does a student learn 
| about how to handle high traffic web applications?  is there any 
| classes?

Your best bet is to read up on other site that had growing pains
(MySpace, Flickr or the granddaddy, Slashdot) and find out what they
did.  For the most part, you'll have to find a service provider that has
the pipes you need for a price you can afford.  Then worry about
partitioning your set-up:
break it up into web servers, app servers (Tomcat), and database
servers.
Try to split your app into static and dynamic pieces, that'll
(theoretically) let you cache static content (icons, logos, boilerplate
text) on the web server, which will help your response time.  If your
database needs are simple (90% reads, most reads from a single table)
consider going with MySQL.  It's proven itself many times over in
high-traffic sites.  If you have any kind of "real" database needs,
though (transactions, complex joins, multiple concurrent updates) you'd
be better off sticking with SQL Server (or Postgres if you need multiple
servers and licensing costs become a factor).  Other than that, just
learn how to instrument your system so you can analyze it to find out
where the bottlenecks are.

Note that I've never actually done any of this, it's just what I've
gleaned from some articles on the net.  IMHO, YMMV, IANAL, etc...

-----------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is confidential proprietary
property of Nelnet, Inc. and its affiliated companies (Nelnet) and is
intended for the recipient only.
Any reproduction, forwarding, or copying without the express permission
of Nelnet is strictly prohibited. If you have received this
communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this
e-mail.
------------------------------------------------------------


---------------------------------------------------------------------
To start a new topic, e-mail: users@tomcat.apache.org
To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscribe@tomcat.apache.org
For additional commands, e-mail: users-help@tomcat.apache.org



---------------------------------------------------------------------
To start a new topic, e-mail: users@tomcat.apache.org
To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscribe@tomcat.apache.org
For additional commands, e-mail: users-help@tomcat.apache.org


Mime
View raw message