tomcat-users mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From "Renato" <webmas...@cienciapura.com.br>
Subject Re: Tomcat Scalability - Long
Date Fri, 25 Oct 2002 14:56:37 GMT
I'm using Tomcat 4.1.12 on a production site with more than 150 clients and it looks like to
me is better that 4.0.x.

On 25 Oct 2002 11:42:14 -0200, Felipe Schnack <felipes@ritterdosreis.br> escreveu :

> De: Felipe Schnack <felipes@ritterdosreis.br>
> Data: 25 Oct 2002 11:42:14 -0200
> Para: Tomcat Users List <tomcat-user@jakarta.apache.org>
> Assunto: Re: Tomcat Scalability - Long
> 
>   I would say Tomcat 4.1.x probably would be good for you mainly if you
> uses lots of Taglibs, if they actually will work on it.
>   Btw, I'm still using 4.0.x... how everybody is doing with 4.1.x? I
> heard is too much buggy for production right now.
> 
> On Fri, 2002-10-25 at 12:20, Glenn Nielsen wrote:
> > I have the following in production:
> > 
> > Tomcat 4.1, JDK 1.3.1, and MySQL on a Dual CPU Sun 250 app server and Apache
> > using mod_jk 1.2 on a separate server. We are now getting 4 weeks continuous uptime.
> > I stop and restart Tomcat once each month because the minimum memory the java heap
> > uses over time increases.  This is on a site handling 30k Tomcat requests per day.
> > With peak loads of 5k-6k Tomcat requests per hour.
> > 
> > When scaling Tomcat there are many issues to address when tuning performance.
> > 
> > I would suggest learning more about how the JVM does garbage collection and
> > test different Java startup args related to jvm stack size, etc.  Try starting
> > Tomcat with the java arg "-verbose:gc", this will collect GC data which can
> > help you when tuning the JVM memory usage.
> > 
> > You might also want to profile your applicaiton using OptimizeIt or JProbe
> > to see if it is the source of the problem.
> > 
> > And of course the performance tuning should be done on test servers which
> > are as close as possible to your production environment and with a load
> > that simulates your site usage.
> > 
> > Consider upgrading to Tomcat 4.1.  Especially if your site uses JSP.
> > Jasper 2 which comes with Tocmat 4.1 significantly improves performance
> > of JSP.
> > 
> > One final note, I would not set reloadable=true on a production system.
> > That adds alot of overhead.  The reloadable option is really there only
> > to make development easier.
> > 
> > Regards,
> > 
> > Glenn
> > 
> > Brandon Cruz wrote:
> > > Does anyone have any solid information about the scalability of Tomcat?  It
> > > seems very limiting to me, but that is hopefully due to improper
> > > configuration.  Here is our situation and what seems to be happening under
a
> > > small amount of stress.
> > > 
> > > ---About our Environment---
> > > 
> > > PIII 1.0Ghz
> > > 512 Meg Ram
> > > Linux RedHat 7.1
> > > MySQL Database
> > > Apache 1.3.x
> > > mod_jk - logging turned all the way down
> > > Tomcat 3.2.4 - contexts *are* reloadable right now
> > > SUN JDK 1.3.1_01
> > > 
> > > ---About our Application---
> > > 
> > > Our Application is a content management tool that reads and writes to the
> > > MySQL Database and reads and writes files.  All the pages within this
> > > application are served by Tomcat 3.2.4.  About 80-120 people per day log
> > > into this application and spend anywhere from 10 minutes to one hour working
> > > on the application.  At any given time there are between 15 and 50 active
> > > database connections.
> > > 
> > > ---What we are seeing---
> > > 
> > > Tomcat needs to be restarted every few days.  If we don't restart it, it
> > > seems tomcat eventually locks up and does not respond at all.  No errors or
> > > anything are reported, it just will not respond.  Apache continues to work
> > > during this time and all static HTML pages are accessible.
> > > 
> > > CPU - The processor usage seems to slowly increase as time goes on.  After
> > > about one day, it seems one java process uses 30% of available CPU or more,
> > > depending on whether users are performing operations or not.  When nobody is
> > > doing anything, the processer still seems to be sitting around 30% until
> > > tomcat is restarted.  This seems to cap after three to five days and not
> > > increase too much more.
> > > 
> > > RAM - This slowly increases and never stops increasing.  We do not have any
> > > special parameters set for the VM when it starts, but this does not seem to
> > > matter.  The RAM gets up to about 135 MB after four or five days, but would
> > > continue to grow if tomcat were not allowed.
> > > 
> > > 
> > > Can anyone explain this behavior, talk about the scalability of Tomcat, or
> > > provide any similar working solutions that perform better than this?  Is it
> > > normal, should we just throw more hardware at it?  Are there configuration
> > > parameters that can be used to increase performance, such as set
> > > reloadable=false in all contexts?  Would we get better performance if we
> > > upgraded to 4.x, or would that just be more work for little improvement?
> > > 
> > > 
> > > --
> > > To unsubscribe, e-mail:   <mailto:tomcat-user-unsubscribe@jakarta.apache.org>
> > > For additional commands, e-mail: <mailto:tomcat-user-help@jakarta.apache.org>
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > --
> > To unsubscribe, e-mail:   <mailto:tomcat-user-unsubscribe@jakarta.apache.org>
> > For additional commands, e-mail: <mailto:tomcat-user-help@jakarta.apache.org>
> > 
> -- 
> 
> Felipe Schnack
> Analista de Sistemas
> felipes@ritterdosreis.br
> Cel.: (51)91287530
> Linux Counter #281893
> 
> Faculdade Ritter dos Reis
> www.ritterdosreis.br
> felipes@ritterdosreis.br
> Fone/Fax.: (51)32303328
> 
> 
> --
> To unsubscribe, e-mail:   <mailto:tomcat-user-unsubscribe@jakarta.apache.org>
> For additional commands, e-mail: <mailto:tomcat-user-help@jakarta.apache.org>
> 
> 
> 
> 



--
To unsubscribe, e-mail:   <mailto:tomcat-user-unsubscribe@jakarta.apache.org>
For additional commands, e-mail: <mailto:tomcat-user-help@jakarta.apache.org>


Mime
View raw message