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From build...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1017261 [28/41] - in /websites/production/tapestry/content: ./ cache/
Date Fri, 25 Aug 2017 08:23:01 GMT
Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/persistent-page-data.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/persistent-page-data.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/persistent-page-data.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,16 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushPlain.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -77,106 +67,23 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>The use of the term "persistence" here refers to <em>page-level</em> persistence, NOT database persistence.</p></div></div><p>Most instance variables in Tapestry are automatically cleared at the end of each request. This is important, as it pertains to how Tapestry pages are shared, over time, by many users.</p><div class="aui-label" style="float:right" title="Related Articles">
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-<h3>Related Articles</h3>
-
-<ul class="content-by-label"><li>
-        <div>
-                <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span>        </div>
-
-        <div class="details">
-                        <a  href="performance-and-clustering.html">Performance and Clustering</a>
-                
-                        
-                    </div>
-    </li><li>
-        <div>
-                <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span>        </div>
-
-        <div class="details">
-                        <a  href="session-storage.html">Session Storage</a>
-                
-                        
-                    </div>
-    </li><li>
-        <div>
-                <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span>        </div>
-
-        <div class="details">
-                        <a  href="persistent-page-data.html">Persistent Page Data</a>
-                
-                        
-                    </div>
-    </li></ul>
-</div>
-
-
-<p>However, you often want to store some data on a <em>single</em> page, and have access to it in later requests to that same page, without having to store it in a database between requests. (To store values across multiple pages, see <a  href="session-storage.html">Session Storage</a>.)</p><p>Making page data persist across requests to a single page is accomplished with the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Persist.html">Persist</a> annotation. This annotation is applied to private instance fields of components:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><rich-text-body><p>The use of the term "persistence" here refers to <em>page-level</em> persistence, NOT database persistence.</p></rich-text-body><p>Most instance variables in Tapestry are automatically cleared at the end of each request. This is important, as it pertains to how Tapestry pages are shared, over time, by many users.</p><parameter ac:name="style">float:right</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="class">aui-label</parameter><rich-text-body><parameter ac:name="showLabels">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="showSpace">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="cql">label = "persistence" and space = currentSpace()</parameter></rich-text-body><p>However, you often want to store some data on a <em>single</em> page, and have access to it in later requests to that same page, without having to store it in a database between requests. (T
 o store values across multiple pages, see <a  href="session-storage.html">Session Storage</a>.)</p><p>Making page data persist across requests to a single page is accomplished with the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Persist.html">Persist</a> annotation. This annotation is applied to private instance fields of components:</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist
   private int value;
-</pre>
-</div></div><p>Such annotated fields will retain their state between requests. Generally, speaking, this means that the value is stored into the session (but other approaches are possible).</p><p>Whenever you make a change to a persistent field, its value is saved. On later requests to the same page, the value for the field is restored.</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-PersistenceStrategies">Persistence Strategies</h2><p>The value for each field is the <em>strategy</em> used to store the field between requests.</p><h3 id="PersistentPageData-SessionStrategy">Session Strategy</h3><p></p><div class="navmenu" style="float:right; background:#eee; margin:3px; padding:0 1em">
-<p>    <strong>JumpStart Demo:</strong><br clear="none">
-    <a  class="external-link" href="http://jumpstart.doublenegative.com.au/jumpstart/examples/state/storingdatainapage" rel="nofollow">Storing Data in a Page</a><br clear="none">
-    <a  class="external-link" href="http://jumpstart.doublenegative.com.au/jumpstart/examples/state/passingdatabetweenpages" rel="nofollow">Passing Data Between Pages</a></p></div>The session strategy stores field changes into the session; the session is created as necessary. Session strategy is the default strategy used unless otherwise overridden.<p>A suitably long session attribute name is used; it incorporates the name of the page, the nested component id, and the name of the field.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Example: Session Strategy</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist
+</plain-text-body><p>Such annotated fields will retain their state between requests. Generally, speaking, this means that the value is stored into the session (but other approaches are possible).</p><p>Whenever you make a change to a persistent field, its value is saved. On later requests to the same page, the value for the field is restored.</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-PersistenceStrategies">Persistence Strategies</h2><p>The value for each field is the <em>strategy</em> used to store the field between requests.</p><h3 id="PersistentPageData-SessionStrategy">Session Strategy</h3><p><plain-text-body>{float:right|background=#eee|padding=0 1em}
+    *JumpStart Demo:*
+    [Storing Data in a Page|http://jumpstart.doublenegative.com.au/jumpstart/examples/state/storingdatainapage]
+    [Passing Data Between Pages|http://jumpstart.doublenegative.com.au/jumpstart/examples/state/passingdatabetweenpages]
+{float}</plain-text-body>The session strategy stores field changes into the session; the session is created as necessary. Session strategy is the default strategy used unless otherwise overridden.</p><p>A suitably long session attribute name is used; it incorporates the name of the page, the nested component id, and the name of the field.</p><parameter ac:name="title">Example: Session Strategy</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist
   private int value;
-</pre>
-</div></div><h3 id="PersistentPageData-FlashStrategy">Flash Strategy</h3><p>The flash strategy stores information in the session as well, just for not very long. Values are stored into the session, but then deleted from the session as they are first used to restore a page's state.</p><p>The flash is typically used to store temporary messages that should only be displayed to the user once.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Example: Flash Strategy</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(PersistenceConstants.FLASH)
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="PersistentPageData-FlashStrategy">Flash Strategy</h3><p>The flash strategy stores information in the session as well, just for not very long. Values are stored into the session, but then deleted from the session as they are first used to restore a page's state.</p><p>The flash is typically used to store temporary messages that should only be displayed to the user once.</p><parameter ac:name="title">Example: Flash Strategy</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(PersistenceConstants.FLASH)
   private int value;
-</pre>
-</div></div><h3 id="PersistentPageData-ClientStrategy">Client Strategy</h3><p>The field is persisted onto the client; you will see an additional query parameter in each URL (or an extra hidden field in each form).</p><p>Client persistence is somewhat expensive. It can bloat the size of the rendered pages by adding hundreds of characters to each link. There is extra processing on each request to de-serialize the values encoded into the query parameter.</p><p>Client persistence does not scale very well; as more information is stored into the query parameter, its length can become problematic. In many cases, web browsers, firewalls or other servers may silently truncate the URL which will break the application.</p><p>Use client persistence with care, and store a minimal amount of data. Try to store the identity (that is, primary key) of an object, rather than the object itself.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="bord
 er-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Example: Client Strategy</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(PersistenceConstants.CLIENT)
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="PersistentPageData-ClientStrategy">Client Strategy</h3><p>The field is persisted onto the client; you will see an additional query parameter in each URL (or an extra hidden field in each form).</p><p>Client persistence is somewhat expensive. It can bloat the size of the rendered pages by adding hundreds of characters to each link. There is extra processing on each request to de-serialize the values encoded into the query parameter.</p><p>Client persistence does not scale very well; as more information is stored into the query parameter, its length can become problematic. In many cases, web browsers, firewalls or other servers may silently truncate the URL which will break the application.</p><p>Use client persistence with care, and store a minimal amount of data. Try to store the identity (that is, primary key) of an object, rather than the object itself.</p><parameter ac:name="title">Example: Client Strategy</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(Persisten
 ceConstants.CLIENT)
   private int value;
-</pre>
-</div></div><h3 id="PersistentPageData-HibernateEntityStrategy">Hibernate Entity Strategy</h3><p><span style="line-height: 1.4285715;">Entity persistence is provided by the tapestry-hibernate module (which extends Tapestry with new features).</span></p><p>In Entity persistence, the field should store a Hibernate entity instance.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>"Hibernate Entity Strategy"</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(HibernatePersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
-  private User user;</pre>
-</div></div><p>&#160;</p><p>The value stored in the HttpSession is a&#160;<em>token</em> for the entity: its Java class name and primary key. When the field is restored in a later request, the entity is re-instantiated using that data.</p><p>What is&#160;<em>not</em> stored is any changes to the persistent entity that are not committed to the external datastore (the database).</p><p>Starting in Tapestry 5.4, it is possible to store a non-persistent entity (a transient entity). A transient entity is stored directly into the HttpSession, and should be Serializable if the application is clustered.</p><h3 id="PersistentPageData-JPAEntityStrategy">JPA Entity Strategy</h3><p>The tapestry-jpa module uses a similar strategy. However, at the current time it can only store a persisted entity (one that has been saved to the database and has a primary key).</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>"Exa
 mple: JPA Entity Strategy"</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(JpaPersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
-  private Account account;</pre>
-</div></div><p><span style="color: rgb(83,145,38);font-size: 20.0px;line-height: 1.5;">Persistence Strategy Inheritance</span></p><p>By default the value for the Persist annotation is the empty string. When this is true, then the actual strategy to be used is determined by a search up the component hierarchy.</p><p>For each component, the meta-data property <code>tapestry.persistence-strategy</code> is checked. This can be specified using the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Meta.html">Meta</a> annotation.</p><p>If the value is non-blank, then that strategy is used. This allows a component to control the persistence strategy used inside any sub-components (that don't explicitly use a different strategy).</p><p>In any case, if no component provides the meta data, then the ultimate default, "session", is used.</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-DefaultValues">Default Values</h2><p>Fields marked with @Persist may not
  have default values (whether set inline, or inside a constructor).</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-ClearingPersistentFields">Clearing Persistent Fields</h2><p>If you reach a point where you know that all data for a page can be discarded, you can do exactly that.</p><p>The method <code>discardPersistentFieldChanges()</code> of ComponentResources will discard all persistent fields for the page, regardless of which strategy is used to store the property. This will not affect the page in memory, but takes effect for subsequent requests.</p><p></p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-ClusteringIssues">Clustering Issues</h2>
-
-<p>The Servlet API was designed with the intention that there would be only a modest amount of server-side state, and that the stored values would be individual numbers and strings, and thus, immutable.</p>
-
-<p>However, many web applications do not use the HttpSession this way, instead storing large, mutable objects in the session. This is not a problem for single servers, but in a cluster, anything stored in the session must be serialized to a bytestream and distributed to other servers within the cluster, and restored there.</p>
-
-<p>Most application servers perform that serialization and distribution whenever HttpSession.setAttribute() is called. This creates a data consistency problem for mutable objects, because if you read a mutable session object, change its state, but <em>don't</em> invoke setAttribute(), the changes will be isolated to just a single server in the cluster.</p>
-
-<p>Tapestry attempts to solve this: any session-persisted object that is read during a request will be re-stored back into the HttpSession at the end of the request. This ensures that changed internal state of those mutable objects is properly replicated around the cluster.</p>
-
-<p>But while this solution solves the data consistency problem, it does so at the expense of performance, since all of those calls to setAttribute() result in extra session data being replicated needlessly if the internal state of the mutable object hasn't changed.</p>
-
-<p>Tapestry has solutions to this, too:</p>
-
-<h3 id="PersistentPageData-@ImmutableSessionPersistedObjectAnnotation">@ImmutableSessionPersistedObject Annotation</h3>
-
-<p>Tapestry knows that Java's String, Number and Boolean classes are immutable. Immutable objects do not require a re-store into the session.</p>
-
-<p>You can mark your own session objects as immutable (and thus not requiring session replication) using the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/ImmutableSessionPersistedObject.html">ImmutableSessionPersistedObject</a> annotation.</p>
-
-<h3 id="PersistentPageData-OptimizedSessionPersistedObjectInterface">OptimizedSessionPersistedObject Interface</h3>
-
-<p>The <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/OptimizedSessionPersistedObject">OptimizedSessionPersistedObject</a> interface allows an object to control this behavior. An object with this interface can track when its mutable state changes. Typically, you should extend from the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/BaseOptimizedSessionPersistedObject.html">BaseOptimizedSessionPersistedObject</a> base class.</p>
-
-<h3 id="PersistentPageData-SessionPersistedObjectAnalyzerService">SessionPersistedObjectAnalyzer Service</h3>
-
-<p>The <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/services/SessionPersistedObjectAnalyzer.html">SessionPersistedObjectAnalyzer</a> service is ultimately responsible for determining whether a session persisted object is dirty or not (dirty meaning in need of a restore into the session). This is an extensible service where new strategies, for new classes, can be introduced.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Example: Entity Session Strategy</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(HibernatePersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
-  private User user;</pre>
-</div></div><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>"Example:JAP Session Strategy"</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  @Persist(JpaPersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
-  private Account account;</pre>
-</div></div></div>
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="PersistentPageData-HibernateEntityStrategy">Hibernate Entity Strategy</h3><p><span style="line-height: 1.4285715;">Entity persistence is provided by the tapestry-hibernate module (which extends Tapestry with new features).</span></p><p>In Entity persistence, the field should store a Hibernate entity instance.</p><parameter ac:name="title">"Hibernate Entity Strategy"</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(HibernatePersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
+  private User user;</plain-text-body><p>&#160;</p><p>The value stored in the HttpSession is a&#160;<em>token</em> for the entity: its Java class name and primary key. When the field is restored in a later request, the entity is re-instantiated using that data.</p><p>What is&#160;<em>not</em> stored is any changes to the persistent entity that are not committed to the external datastore (the database).</p><p>Starting in Tapestry 5.4, it is possible to store a non-persistent entity (a transient entity). A transient entity is stored directly into the HttpSession, and should be Serializable if the application is clustered.</p><h3 id="PersistentPageData-JPAEntityStrategy">JPA Entity Strategy</h3><p>The tapestry-jpa module uses a similar strategy. However, at the current time it can only store a persisted entity (one that has been saved to the database and has a primary key).</p><parameter ac:name="title">"Example: JPA Entity Strategy"</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(JpaPersistenc
 eConstants.ENTITY)
+  private Account account;</plain-text-body><p><span style="color: rgb(83,145,38);font-size: 20.0px;line-height: 1.5;">Persistence Strategy Inheritance</span></p><p>By default the value for the Persist annotation is the empty string. When this is true, then the actual strategy to be used is determined by a search up the component hierarchy.</p><p>For each component, the meta-data property <code>tapestry.persistence-strategy</code> is checked. This can be specified using the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Meta.html">Meta</a> annotation.</p><p>If the value is non-blank, then that strategy is used. This allows a component to control the persistence strategy used inside any sub-components (that don't explicitly use a different strategy).</p><p>In any case, if no component provides the meta data, then the ultimate default, "session", is used.</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-DefaultValues">Default Values</h2><p>Fie
 lds marked with @Persist may not have default values (whether set inline, or inside a constructor).</p><h2 id="PersistentPageData-ClearingPersistentFields">Clearing Persistent Fields</h2><p>If you reach a point where you know that all data for a page can be discarded, you can do exactly that.</p><p>The method <code>discardPersistentFieldChanges()</code> of ComponentResources will discard all persistent fields for the page, regardless of which strategy is used to store the property. This will not affect the page in memory, but takes effect for subsequent requests.</p><p><parameter ac:name=""><a  href="clustering-issues.html">Clustering Issues</a></parameter></p><parameter ac:name="title">Example: Entity Session Strategy</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(HibernatePersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
+  private User user;</plain-text-body><parameter ac:name="title">"Example:JAP Session Strategy"</parameter><plain-text-body>  @Persist(JpaPersistenceConstants.ENTITY)
+  private Account account;</plain-text-body></div>
       </div>
 
       <div class="clearer"></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/pipelinebuilder-service.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/pipelinebuilder-service.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/pipelinebuilder-service.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,14 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -44,13 +36,26 @@
 
   <div class="wrapper bs">
 
-        <div id="navigation"><div class="nav"><ul class="alternate"><li><a  href="index.html">Home</a></li><li><a  href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a></li><li><a  href="documentation.html">Documentation</a></li><li><a  href="download.html">Download</a></li><li><a  href="about.html">About</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0">License</a></li><li><a  href="community.html">Community</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/security/">Security</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/">Apache</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/sponsorship.html">Sponsorship</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/thanks.html">Thanks</a></li></ul></div></div>
+        <div id="navigation"><div class="nav"><ul class="alternate"><li><a  href="index.html">Home</a></li><li><a  href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a></li><li><a  href="documentation.html">Documentation</a></li><li><a  href="download.html">Download</a></li><li><a  href="about.html">About</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0">License</a></li><li><a  href="community.html">Community</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/security/">Security</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/">Apache</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/sponsorship.html">Sponsorship</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/thanks.html">Thanks</a></li></ul></div>
+
+</div>
 
           <div id="top">
-            <div id="smallbanner"><div class="searchbox" style="float:right;margin: .3em 1em .1em 1em"><span style="color: #999; font-size: 90%">Tapestry docs, issues, wikis &amp; blogs:</span><form enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" method="get" action="http://tapestry.apache.org/search.html"> 
- <input type="text" name="q"> 
- <input type="submit" value="Search"> 
-</form></div><div class="emblem" style="float:left"><p><a  href="index.html"><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image confluence-external-resource" src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png" data-image-src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png"></span></a></p></div><div class="title" style="float:left; margin: 0 0 0 3em"><h1 id="SmallBanner-PageTitle">PipelineBuilder Service</h1></div></div>
+            <div id="smallbanner"><div class="searchbox" style="float:right;margin: .3em 1em .1em 1em"><span style="color: #999; font-size: 90%">Tapestry docs, issues, wikis &amp; blogs:</span>
+<form enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" method="get" action="http://tapestry.apache.org/search.html">
+  <input type="text" name="q">
+  <input type="submit" value="Search">
+</form>
+
+</div>
+
+
+<div class="emblem" style="float:left"><p><a  href="index.html"><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image confluence-external-resource" src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png" data-image-src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png"></span></a></p></div>
+
+
+<div class="title" style="float:left; margin: 0 0 0 3em"><h1 id="SmallBanner-PageTitle">PipelineBuilder Service</h1></div>
+
+</div>
       <div class="clearer"></div>
       </div>
 
@@ -62,32 +67,7 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>The <strong>PipelineBuilder Service</strong> is a service used to create pipelines, also known as <em>filter chains</em>. An example of this is the Filter and FilterChain interfaces inside the Servlet API.</p><div class="aui-label" style="float:right" title="Related Articles"><h3>Related Articles</h3><ul class="content-by-label"><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="shadowbuilder-service.html">ShadowBuilder Service</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="strategybuilder-service.html">StrategyBuilder Service</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="pipelinebuilder-service.html">PipelineBuilder Service</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="chainbuilder-service.html">ChainBuilder Service</a> 
-  </div> </li></ul></div><p>In this pattern, an existing service is decorated with a filter. The filter will delegate to the service, but has the chance to alter or replace parameters before invoking the method, and can perform operations before returning. This is similar to <a  href="chainbuilder-service.html">chain of responsibility</a>, but differs in that there are two interfaces (the service interface and the filter interface) and that each filter invokes the next filter via the service interface. In contrast, in the chain of responsibility, the chain invokes each method, which must return before the next command in the chain is invoked.</p><p>The service interface and the filter interface are closely related: the filter interface must match the service interface method for method, but each method of the filter interface must have an additional parameter whose type is the service interface. For example, a pipeline that performed string transformations might use the following in
 terfaces:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public interface StringTransformService
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>The <strong>PipelineBuilder Service</strong> is a service used to create pipelines, also known as <em>filter chains</em>. An example of this is the Filter and FilterChain interfaces inside the Servlet API.</p><parameter ac:name="style">float:right</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="class">aui-label</parameter><rich-text-body><parameter ac:name="showLabels">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="showSpace">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="cql">label = "service-builders" and space = currentSpace()</parameter></rich-text-body><p>In this pattern, an existing service is decorated with a filter. The filter will delegate to the service, but has the chance to alter or replace parameters before invoking the method, and can perform operations before returning. This is similar to <a  href="chainbuilder-service.html">chain of responsibility</
 a>, but differs in that there are two interfaces (the service interface and the filter interface) and that each filter invokes the next filter via the service interface. In contrast, in the chain of responsibility, the chain invokes each method, which must return before the next command in the chain is invoked.</p><p>The service interface and the filter interface are closely related: the filter interface must match the service interface method for method, but each method of the filter interface must have an additional parameter whose type is the service interface. For example, a pipeline that performed string transformations might use the following interfaces:</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public interface StringTransformService
 {
   String transform(String input);
 }
@@ -95,25 +75,19 @@
 public interface StringTransformFilter
 {
   String transform(String input, StringTransformService delegate);
-}</pre>
-</div></div><p>An implementation of the filter might look like:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class UpcasePreFilter implements StringTransformFilter
+}</plain-text-body><p>An implementation of the filter might look like:</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class UpcasePreFilter implements StringTransformFilter
 {
   public String transform(String input, StringTransformService delegate)
   {
     return delegate.transform(input.toUpperCase());
   }
-}</pre>
-</div></div><p>Alternately, the filter could pass input to delegate unchanged, but invoke toUpperCase() on the result:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class UpcasePostFilter implements StringTransformFilter
+}</plain-text-body><p>Alternately, the filter could pass input to delegate unchanged, but invoke toUpperCase() on the result:</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class UpcasePostFilter implements StringTransformFilter
 {
   public String transform(String input, StringTransformService delegate)
   {
     return delegate.transform(input).toUpperCase();
   }
-}</pre>
-</div></div><p>The PipelineBuilder Service (<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/services/PipelineBuilder.html">API</a>) is useful for constructing pipelines. The service is often injected into a service builder method, along with an ordered configuration of services.</p><p>What the builder accomplishes is to represent each <em>filter</em> in the pipeline as an instance of the <em>service</em> interface.</p><p><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image" src="pipelinebuilder-service.data/PipelineCallingSequence.png"></span><br clear="none"> Pipeline Calling Sequence</p><p>The bridges are created by the PipelineBuilder service. The terminator must be provided. The bridges and the terminator implement the service interface.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">  public static StringTransformService build(
+}</plain-text-body><p>The PipelineBuilder Service (<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/services/PipelineBuilder.html">API</a>) is useful for constructing pipelines. The service is often injected into a service builder method, along with an ordered configuration of services.</p><p>What the builder accomplishes is to represent each <em>filter</em> in the pipeline as an instance of the <em>service</em> interface.</p><p><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image" src="pipelinebuilder-service.data/PipelineCallingSequence.png"></span><br clear="none"> Pipeline Calling Sequence</p><p>The bridges are created by the PipelineBuilder service. The terminator must be provided. The bridges and the terminator implement the service interface.</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>  public static StringTransformService build(
     @InjectService("PipelineBuilder")
     PipelineBuilder builder,
     List&lt;StringTransformFilter&gt; configuration,
@@ -132,8 +106,7 @@ public interface StringTransformFilter
         StringTransformService.class, StringTransformFilter.class,
         configuration,
         terminator);
-    }    </pre>
-</div></div><p>Here, we create the terminator for the pipeline as an inner class instance, and feed that into the builder. The result is a new service that encapsulates the entire pipeline. When there are no filters, this is just the terminator.</p><p>&#160;</p><p></p></div>
+    }    </plain-text-body><p>Here, we create the terminator for the pipeline as an inner class instance, and feed that into the builder. The result is a new service that encapsulates the entire pipeline. When there are no filters, this is just the terminator.</p><p>&#160;</p><p></p></div>
       </div>
 
       <div class="clearer"></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/principles.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/principles.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/principles.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,14 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -44,13 +36,26 @@
 
   <div class="wrapper bs">
 
-        <div id="navigation"><div class="nav"><ul class="alternate"><li><a  href="index.html">Home</a></li><li><a  href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a></li><li><a  href="documentation.html">Documentation</a></li><li><a  href="download.html">Download</a></li><li><a  href="about.html">About</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0">License</a></li><li><a  href="community.html">Community</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/security/">Security</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/">Apache</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/sponsorship.html">Sponsorship</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/thanks.html">Thanks</a></li></ul></div></div>
+        <div id="navigation"><div class="nav"><ul class="alternate"><li><a  href="index.html">Home</a></li><li><a  href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a></li><li><a  href="documentation.html">Documentation</a></li><li><a  href="download.html">Download</a></li><li><a  href="about.html">About</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0">License</a></li><li><a  href="community.html">Community</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/security/">Security</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/">Apache</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/sponsorship.html">Sponsorship</a></li><li><a  class="external-link" href="http://www.apache.org/foundation/thanks.html">Thanks</a></li></ul></div>
+
+</div>
 
           <div id="top">
-            <div id="smallbanner"><div class="searchbox" style="float:right;margin: .3em 1em .1em 1em"><span style="color: #999; font-size: 90%">Tapestry docs, issues, wikis &amp; blogs:</span><form enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" method="get" action="http://tapestry.apache.org/search.html"> 
- <input type="text" name="q"> 
- <input type="submit" value="Search"> 
-</form></div><div class="emblem" style="float:left"><p><a  href="index.html"><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image confluence-external-resource" src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png" data-image-src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png"></span></a></p></div><div class="title" style="float:left; margin: 0 0 0 3em"><h1 id="SmallBanner-PageTitle">Principles</h1></div></div>
+            <div id="smallbanner"><div class="searchbox" style="float:right;margin: .3em 1em .1em 1em"><span style="color: #999; font-size: 90%">Tapestry docs, issues, wikis &amp; blogs:</span>
+<form enctype="application/x-www-form-urlencoded" method="get" action="http://tapestry.apache.org/search.html">
+  <input type="text" name="q">
+  <input type="submit" value="Search">
+</form>
+
+</div>
+
+
+<div class="emblem" style="float:left"><p><a  href="index.html"><span class="confluence-embedded-file-wrapper"><img class="confluence-embedded-image confluence-external-resource" src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png" data-image-src="http://tapestry.apache.org/images/tapestry_small.png"></span></a></p></div>
+
+
+<div class="title" style="float:left; margin: 0 0 0 3em"><h1 id="SmallBanner-PageTitle">Principles</h1></div>
+
+</div>
       <div class="clearer"></div>
       </div>
 
@@ -62,38 +67,7 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><div class="aui-label" style="float:right" title="Related Articles"><h3>Related Articles</h3><ul class="content-by-label"><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="tapestry-for-jsf-users.html">Tapestry for JSF Users</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="tapestry-tutorial.html">Tapestry Tutorial</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="principles.html">Principles</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a> 
-  </div> </li><li> 
-  <div> 
-   <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span> 
-  </div> 
-  <div class="details"> 
-   <a  href="introduction.html">Introduction</a> 
-  </div> </li></ul></div><h1 id="Principles-Principle1&#8211;StaticStructure,DynamicBehavior">Principle 1 &#8211; Static Structure, Dynamic Behavior</h1><p>The concept of "Dynamic Behavior" should be pretty obvious when you are building a web application; things should look different for different users/situations. But what does it mean that Tapestry has "Static Structure?" Static structure implies that when you build a page in Tapestry you are going to define all of the types of components that are used within that page. Under no circumstance during the rendering or event processing of the page will you be able to dynamically create a new type of component and place that into the component tree.</p><p>At first glance, this seems quite limiting ... other frameworks allow new elements to be created on the fly; it's also a common feature of desktop GUIs such as Swing. But static structure turns out to be not so limiting after all. You <em>can</em> create new elements (you're actually 
 re-rendering existing components with different properties). And you have plenty of options for getting dynamic behavior out of your static structure; from the simple conditional and looping components to the more advanced implementations of Tapestry's BeanEditor or Grid components, Tapestry gives you control over what renders and when, and even where it appears on the page. And starting in Tapestry 5.3 you can even use the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/corelib/components/Dynamic.html">Dynamic component</a>, which renders whatever is in an external template file.</p><p>Why did Tapestry choose static structure as a core principle? It's really a matter of meeting the requirements of agility and scalability.</p><h2 id="Principles-Agility">Agility</h2><p>Tapestry is designed to be an agile working environment; "code less, deliver more". To support you writing less code Tapestry does a lot of work on your POJO pages and co
 mponents when first loading them. It also uses shared instances of page and component classes (shared across multiple threads and requests). Having dynamically modifiable structure would imply that each request has its own instance and, further, that the entire structure would need to be serialized between requests so that it can be restored to handle later requests.</p><p>Tapestry also makes you more agile by speeding up the development cycle with <a  href="class-reloading.html">Live Class Reloading</a>. Tapestry monitors the file system for changes to Java page classes, component classes, service implementation classes, HTML templates and component property files, and it hot-swaps the changes into the running application without requiring a restart <em>or losing session data</em>. This provides a very short code-save-view cycle that no other framework can touch.</p><h2 id="Principles-Scalability">Scalability</h2><p>When building large scale systems it is important to consider how 
 your resources are going to be used on each deployed server, and how that information is going to be shared between servers. Static structure means that page instances do not need to be stored inside the HttpSession and simple browsing users do not require extra system resources. This lean use of the HttpSession is key to Tapestry's very high scalability, especially in a clustered configuration. Again, linking an instance of a page to a particular client would require vastly more server-side resources than having a single shared page instance.</p><h1 id="Principles-Principle2&#8211;AdaptiveAPI">Principle 2 &#8211; Adaptive API</h1><p>A key feature of Tapestry 5 is its adaptive API.</p><p>In traditional Java frameworks (including Struts, <a  href="tapestry-for-jsf-users.html">JSF</a> and even the now-ancient Tapestry 4) user code is expected to conform to the framework. You create classes that extend from framework-provided base classes, or implement framework-provided interfaces.</p
 ><p>This works well until you upgrade to the next release of the framework: with the new features of the upgrade, you will more often than not experience breaks in backwards compatibility. Interfaces or base classes will have changed and your existing code will need to be changed to match.</p><p>In Tapestry 5, the framework adapts to your code. You have control over the names of the methods, the parameters they take, and the value that is returned. This is driven by annotations, which tell Tapestry under what circumstances your methods are to be invoked.</p><p>For example, you may have a login form and have a method that gets invoked when the form is submitted:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class Login
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><parameter ac:name="style">float:right</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="class">aui-label</parameter><rich-text-body><parameter ac:name="showLabels">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="showSpace">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="cql">label = "new-users" and space = currentSpace()</parameter></rich-text-body><h1 id="Principles-Principle1&#8211;StaticStructure,DynamicBehavior">Principle 1 &#8211; Static Structure, Dynamic Behavior</h1><p>The concept of "Dynamic Behavior" should be pretty obvious when you are building a web application; things should look different for different users/situations. But what does it mean that Tapestry has "Static Structure?" Static structure implies that when you build a page in Tapestry you are going to define all of the types of components that are used within that page. Under no circumstance during 
 the rendering or event processing of the page will you be able to dynamically create a new type of component and place that into the component tree.</p><p>At first glance, this seems quite limiting ... other frameworks allow new elements to be created on the fly; it's also a common feature of desktop GUIs such as Swing. But static structure turns out to be not so limiting after all. You <em>can</em> create new elements (you're actually re-rendering existing components with different properties). And you have plenty of options for getting dynamic behavior out of your static structure; from the simple conditional and looping components to the more advanced implementations of Tapestry's BeanEditor or Grid components, Tapestry gives you control over what renders and when, and even where it appears on the page. And starting in Tapestry 5.3 you can even use the <a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/corelib/components/Dynamic.html">
 Dynamic component</a>, which renders whatever is in an external template file.</p><p>Why did Tapestry choose static structure as a core principle? It's really a matter of meeting the requirements of agility and scalability.</p><h2 id="Principles-Agility">Agility</h2><p>Tapestry is designed to be an agile working environment; "code less, deliver more". To support you writing less code Tapestry does a lot of work on your POJO pages and components when first loading them. It also uses shared instances of page and component classes (shared across multiple threads and requests). Having dynamically modifiable structure would imply that each request has its own instance and, further, that the entire structure would need to be serialized between requests so that it can be restored to handle later requests.</p><p>Tapestry also makes you more agile by speeding up the development cycle with <a  href="class-reloading.html">Live Class Reloading</a>. Tapestry monitors the file system for changes 
 to Java page classes, component classes, service implementation classes, HTML templates and component property files, and it hot-swaps the changes into the running application without requiring a restart <em>or losing session data</em>. This provides a very short code-save-view cycle that no other framework can touch.</p><h2 id="Principles-Scalability">Scalability</h2><p>When building large scale systems it is important to consider how your resources are going to be used on each deployed server, and how that information is going to be shared between servers. Static structure means that page instances do not need to be stored inside the HttpSession and simple browsing users do not require extra system resources. This lean use of the HttpSession is key to Tapestry's very high scalability, especially in a clustered configuration. Again, linking an instance of a page to a particular client would require vastly more server-side resources than having a single shared page instance.</p><h1 
 id="Principles-Principle2&#8211;AdaptiveAPI">Principle 2 &#8211; Adaptive API</h1><p>A key feature of Tapestry 5 is its adaptive API.</p><p>In traditional Java frameworks (including Struts, <a  href="tapestry-for-jsf-users.html">JSF</a> and even the now-ancient Tapestry 4) user code is expected to conform to the framework. You create classes that extend from framework-provided base classes, or implement framework-provided interfaces.</p><p>This works well until you upgrade to the next release of the framework: with the new features of the upgrade, you will more often than not experience breaks in backwards compatibility. Interfaces or base classes will have changed and your existing code will need to be changed to match.</p><p>In Tapestry 5, the framework adapts to your code. You have control over the names of the methods, the parameters they take, and the value that is returned. This is driven by annotations, which tell Tapestry under what circumstances your methods are to be invok
 ed.</p><p>For example, you may have a login form and have a method that gets invoked when the form is submitted:</p><parameter ac:name="lang">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class Login
 {
   @Persist
   @Property
@@ -121,8 +95,7 @@
     return PostLogin.class;
   }
 }
-</pre>
-</div></div><p>This short snippet demonstrates a bit about how Tapestry operates. Pages and services within the application are injected with the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/annotations/Inject.html">Inject</a> annotation. The method names, <code>onValidateFromForm()</code> and <code>onSuccessFromForm()</code>, inform Tapestry about when each method is to be invoked. This naming convention identifies the event that is handled, ("validate" and "success") and the id of the component from which the event is triggered (the "form" component).</p><p>The "validate" event is triggered to perform cross-field validations, and the "success" event is only triggered when there are no validation errors. The <code>onSuccessFromForm()</code> method's return value directs Tapestry on what to do next: jump to another page within the application (here identified as the class for the page, but many other options exist). When there 
 are exceptions, the page will be redisplayed to the user.</p><p>By contrast, in Tapestry 4 the Form component's listener parameter would be bound to the method to invoke, by name. Further, the listener method had to be public. The Tapestry 5 approach not only supports multiple listeners, but also provides an improved separation of view concerns (inside the page's HTML template) and logic concerns, inside the Java class.</p><p>In many cases, additional information about the event is available and can be passed into the method simply by adding parameters to the method. Again, Tapestry will adapt to your parameters, in whatever order you supply them.</p><p>Tapestry also saves you needless effort: the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Property.html">Property</a> annotation marks a field as readable and writable; Tapestry will provide the accessor methods automatically.</p><p>Finally, Tapestry 5 explicitly separat
 es actions (requests that change things) and rendering (requests that render pages) into two separate requests. Performing an action, such as clicking an action link or submitting a form, results in a client-side redirect to the new page. This is the "<a  class="external-link" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post/Redirect/Get" rel="nofollow">Post/Redirect/Get</a>" pattern (alternatively "Post-Then-Redirect", or "Redirect After Post"). This helps ensure that URLs in the browser are book-markable ... but also requires that a bit more information be stored in the session between requests (using the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Persist.html">Persist</a> annotation).</p><h1 id="Principles-Principle3&#8211;DifferentiatePublicvs.InternalAPIs">Principle 3 &#8211; Differentiate Public vs. Internal APIs</h1><p>An issue plaguing much ancient versions of Tapestry (4 and earlier) was the lack of a clear delineatio
 n between private, internal APIs and public, external APIs. The fact that your code would extend from base objects but that many of the methods on those base objects were "off limits" further confused the issue. This has been identified as a key factor in the "steep learning curve of Tapestry" meme.</p><p>Designed from a clean slate, Tapestry 5 is much more ruthless about what is internal vs. external.</p><p>First of all, anything inside the org.apache.tapestry5.internal package is internal. It is part of the implementation of Tapestry. It is the man behind the curtain. You should not ever need to directly use this code. It is a bad idea to do so, because internal code may change from one release to the next without concern for backwards compatibility.</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-tip"><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-approve confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>If you
  ever find yourself forced to make use of internal APIs, please bring it up on the developer mailing list; this is how we know which services should be exposed as public, and fall under the backwards compatibility umbrella.</p></div></div><h1 id="Principles-Principle4&#8211;EnsureBackwardsCompatibility">Principle 4 &#8211; Ensure Backwards Compatibility</h1><p>Older versions of Tapestry were plagued by backwards compatibility problems with every major release. Tapestry 5 did not even attempt to be backwards compatible to Tapestry 4. Instead, it laid the ground work for true backwards compatibility going forwards.</p><p>Tapestry 5's API is based largely on naming conventions and annotations. Your components are just ordinary Java classes; you annotate fields to allow Tapestry to maintain their state or to allow Tapestry to inject resources, and you name (or annotate) methods to tell Tapestry under what circumstances a method should be invoked.</p><p>Tapestry will adapt to your classe
 s. It will call your methods, passing in values via method parameters. Instead of the rigidness of a fixed interface to implement, Tapestry will simply adapt to your classes, using the hints provided by annotations and simple naming conventions.</p><p>Because of this, Tapestry 5 can change internally to a great degree without it affecting any of the application code you write. This has finally cracked the backwards compatibility nut, allowing you to have great assurance that you can upgrade to future releases of Tapestry without breaking your existing applications.</p><p>This is already evident in Tapestry 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 where major new features and improvements have occurred, while remaining 100% backwards compatible to Tapestry 5.0 &#8211; as long as you've avoided the temptation to use internal APIs.</p><hr><p>&#160;</p></div>
+</plain-text-body><p>This short snippet demonstrates a bit about how Tapestry operates. Pages and services within the application are injected with the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/annotations/Inject.html">Inject</a> annotation. The method names, <code>onValidateFromForm()</code> and <code>onSuccessFromForm()</code>, inform Tapestry about when each method is to be invoked. This naming convention identifies the event that is handled, ("validate" and "success") and the id of the component from which the event is triggered (the "form" component).</p><p>The "validate" event is triggered to perform cross-field validations, and the "success" event is only triggered when there are no validation errors. The <code>onSuccessFromForm()</code> method's return value directs Tapestry on what to do next: jump to another page within the application (here identified as the class for the page, but many other options exist). When 
 there are exceptions, the page will be redisplayed to the user.</p><p>By contrast, in Tapestry 4 the Form component's listener parameter would be bound to the method to invoke, by name. Further, the listener method had to be public. The Tapestry 5 approach not only supports multiple listeners, but also provides an improved separation of view concerns (inside the page's HTML template) and logic concerns, inside the Java class.</p><p>In many cases, additional information about the event is available and can be passed into the method simply by adding parameters to the method. Again, Tapestry will adapt to your parameters, in whatever order you supply them.</p><p>Tapestry also saves you needless effort: the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Property.html">Property</a> annotation marks a field as readable and writable; Tapestry will provide the accessor methods automatically.</p><p>Finally, Tapestry 5 explicitly s
 eparates actions (requests that change things) and rendering (requests that render pages) into two separate requests. Performing an action, such as clicking an action link or submitting a form, results in a client-side redirect to the new page. This is the "<a  class="external-link" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post/Redirect/Get" rel="nofollow">Post/Redirect/Get</a>" pattern (alternatively "Post-Then-Redirect", or "Redirect After Post"). This helps ensure that URLs in the browser are book-markable ... but also requires that a bit more information be stored in the session between requests (using the @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/annotations/Persist.html">Persist</a> annotation).</p><h1 id="Principles-Principle3&#8211;DifferentiatePublicvs.InternalAPIs">Principle 3 &#8211; Differentiate Public vs. Internal APIs</h1><p>An issue plaguing much ancient versions of Tapestry (4 and earlier) was the lack of a clear deli
 neation between private, internal APIs and public, external APIs. The fact that your code would extend from base objects but that many of the methods on those base objects were "off limits" further confused the issue. This has been identified as a key factor in the "steep learning curve of Tapestry" meme.</p><p>Designed from a clean slate, Tapestry 5 is much more ruthless about what is internal vs. external.</p><p>First of all, anything inside the org.apache.tapestry5.internal package is internal. It is part of the implementation of Tapestry. It is the man behind the curtain. You should not ever need to directly use this code. It is a bad idea to do so, because internal code may change from one release to the next without concern for backwards compatibility.</p><rich-text-body><p>If you ever find yourself forced to make use of internal APIs, please bring it up on the developer mailing list; this is how we know which services should be exposed as public, and fall under the backwards 
 compatibility umbrella.</p></rich-text-body><h1 id="Principles-Principle4&#8211;EnsureBackwardsCompatibility">Principle 4 &#8211; Ensure Backwards Compatibility</h1><p>Older versions of Tapestry were plagued by backwards compatibility problems with every major release. Tapestry 5 did not even attempt to be backwards compatible to Tapestry 4. Instead, it laid the ground work for true backwards compatibility going forwards.</p><p>Tapestry 5's API is based largely on naming conventions and annotations. Your components are just ordinary Java classes; you annotate fields to allow Tapestry to maintain their state or to allow Tapestry to inject resources, and you name (or annotate) methods to tell Tapestry under what circumstances a method should be invoked.</p><p>Tapestry will adapt to your classes. It will call your methods, passing in values via method parameters. Instead of the rigidness of a fixed interface to implement, Tapestry will simply adapt to your classes, using the hints prov
 ided by annotations and simple naming conventions.</p><p>Because of this, Tapestry 5 can change internally to a great degree without it affecting any of the application code you write. This has finally cracked the backwards compatibility nut, allowing you to have great assurance that you can upgrade to future releases of Tapestry without breaking your existing applications.</p><p>This is already evident in Tapestry 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 where major new features and improvements have occurred, while remaining 100% backwards compatible to Tapestry 5.0 &#8211; as long as you've avoided the temptation to use internal APIs.</p><hr><p>&#160;</p></div>
       </div>
 
       <div class="clearer"></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/property-expressions.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/property-expressions.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/property-expressions.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -67,41 +67,7 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>Tapestry uses <strong>property expressions</strong> to move data between components. Property expressions are the basis of the <a  href="component-parameters.html">component parameters</a> and <a  href="component-templates.html">template expansions</a>.</p><div class="aui-label" style="float:right" title="Related Articles">
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-<h3>Related Articles</h3>
-
-<ul class="content-by-label"><li>
-        <div>
-                <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span>        </div>
-
-        <div class="details">
-                        <a  href="component-templates.html">Component Templates</a>
-                
-                        
-                    </div>
-    </li><li>
-        <div>
-                <span class="icon aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-page-default" title="Page">Page:</span>        </div>
-
-        <div class="details">
-                        <a  href="component-parameters.html">Component Parameters</a>
-                
-                        
-                    </div>
-    </li></ul>
-</div>
-
-
-<p>A property expression is a string that explains to Tapestry how to navigate from a root object (the containing component) through some number of properties, to a final property that can be read or updated. In fact, that's a simplification, as the properties may actually be public fields, or even method invocations.</p><p>As elsewhere in Tapestry, the names of fields, properties, and methods are recognized in a case-insensitive manner.</p><p>The most basic form of a property expression is a simple property name, such as "userName".</p><p>A series of property names may be specified, separated by periods: "user.name", which is equivalent to either <code>getUser().getName()</code> or <code>getUser().setName()</code>, depending on context (whether the expression is being read or updated).</p><p>The "." is called the "dereference operator". A second operator is "?." or the "safe dereference operator". This works the same as "." except that it allows any of the properties to be null. Wh
 en reading, a null short-circuits the expression (which returns null). When writing to a property, an intermediate null value will cause the value to be discarded without error.</p><p>In other words, "user?.name" works, even when the <code>user</code> property may be null.</p><p>Property expressions can also reference public methods. Methods may take parameters (or not), but must not return void. When the final term in a property expression is a method, then the property expression is read-only.</p><p>Being able to invoke methods was originally added so that it was possible to access methods such as <code>java.util.Map.size()</code> (which is not named like a property getter method). In Tapestry 5.1, property expressions were extended so that parameters could be passed into methods.</p><p>Parameters to methods are, themselves, property expressions. This means that you can write a property expression that reads a property and passes it as a parameter to a method, and then access a pr
 operty of the object returned from the method.</p><h2 id="PropertyExpressions-Compilation">Compilation</h2><p>Property expressions are compiled to Java classes at runtime; there is no runtime reflection (unlike the OGNL expression language used in prior releases of Tapestry).</p><h2 id="PropertyExpressions-Grammar">Grammar</h2><p>Expressed in simplified <a  class="external-link" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backus%E2%80%93Naur_Form" rel="nofollow">Backus&#8211;Naur Form</a>, the grammar of property expressions is as follows:</p><div class="preformatted panel" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="preformattedContent panelContent">
-<pre>expression : keyword | rangeOp | constant | propertyChain | list | notOp | map;
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>Tapestry uses <strong>property expressions</strong> to move data between components. Property expressions are the basis of the <a  href="component-parameters.html">component parameters</a> and <a  href="component-templates.html">template expansions</a>.</p><parameter ac:name="style">float:right</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="class">aui-label</parameter><rich-text-body><parameter ac:name="showLabels">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="showSpace">false</parameter><parameter ac:name="title">Related Articles</parameter><parameter ac:name="cql">label = "expressions" and space = currentSpace()</parameter></rich-text-body><p>A property expression is a string that explains to Tapestry how to navigate from a root object (the containing component) through some number of properties, to a final property that can be read or updated. In fact, that's a simplification, as the properties may actua
 lly be public fields, or even method invocations.</p><p>As elsewhere in Tapestry, the names of fields, properties, and methods are recognized in a case-insensitive manner.</p><p>The most basic form of a property expression is a simple property name, such as "userName".</p><p>A series of property names may be specified, separated by periods: "user.name", which is equivalent to either <code>getUser().getName()</code> or <code>getUser().setName()</code>, depending on context (whether the expression is being read or updated).</p><p>The "." is called the "dereference operator". A second operator is "?." or the "safe dereference operator". This works the same as "." except that it allows any of the properties to be null. When reading, a null short-circuits the expression (which returns null). When writing to a property, an intermediate null value will cause the value to be discarded without error.</p><p>In other words, "user?.name" works, even when the <code>user</code> property may be nu
 ll.</p><p>Property expressions can also reference public methods. Methods may take parameters (or not), but must not return void. When the final term in a property expression is a method, then the property expression is read-only.</p><p>Being able to invoke methods was originally added so that it was possible to access methods such as <code>java.util.Map.size()</code> (which is not named like a property getter method). In Tapestry 5.1, property expressions were extended so that parameters could be passed into methods.</p><p>Parameters to methods are, themselves, property expressions. This means that you can write a property expression that reads a property and passes it as a parameter to a method, and then access a property of the object returned from the method.</p><h2 id="PropertyExpressions-Compilation">Compilation</h2><p>Property expressions are compiled to Java classes at runtime; there is no runtime reflection (unlike the OGNL expression language used in prior releases of Tape
 stry).</p><h2 id="PropertyExpressions-Grammar">Grammar</h2><p>Expressed in simplified <a  class="external-link" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backus%E2%80%93Naur_Form" rel="nofollow">Backus&#8211;Naur Form</a>, the grammar of property expressions is as follows:</p><plain-text-body>expression : keyword | rangeOp | constant | propertyChain | list | notOp | map;
 
 keyword : 'null' | 'this';
 
@@ -132,8 +98,7 @@ mapEntry : mapKey ':' expression;
 mapKey : keyword | constant | propertyChain;
 
 
-</pre>
-</div></div><p>
+</plain-text-body><p>
 
 </p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">Added in 5.3</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body">
 </div></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/registry-startup.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/registry-startup.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/registry-startup.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,14 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -75,21 +67,18 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>It is possible to provide extra logic to be executed at Registry startup, by making contributions to the RegistryStartup service configuration.</p><p>The values contributed are Runnable objects. The configuration is ordered, so it is possible to control in what order the objects are executed.</p><p>RegistryStartup occurs after eager loaded services are instantiated.</p><p>Here's an example of a module that makes a contribution:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class MyModule
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p>It is possible to provide extra logic to be executed at Registry startup, by making contributions to the RegistryStartup service configuration.</p><p>The values contributed are Runnable objects. The configuration is ordered, so it is possible to control in what order the objects are executed.</p><p>RegistryStartup occurs after eager loaded services are instantiated.</p><p>Here's an example of a module that makes a contribution:</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class MyModule
 {
   public static void contributeRegistryStartup(OrderedConfiguration&lt;Runnable&gt; configuration)
   {
     configuration.add("MyContributionName", new Runnable() { ... });
   }
-}</pre>
-</div></div><p>Generally, these contributions are in the form of inner classes; if they were services, they could just be eagerly loaded.</p><h2 id="RegistryStartup-StartupMethods">Startup Methods</h2><p>
+}</plain-text-body><p>Generally, these contributions are in the form of inner classes; if they were services, they could just be eagerly loaded.</p><h2 id="RegistryStartup-StartupMethods">Startup Methods</h2><p>
 
 </p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">Added in 5.2</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body">
 </div></div>
 <div class="error"><span class="error">Unknown macro: {div}</span> 
-<p>&#160;</p></div>Instead of making contributions to the RegistryStartup service configuration you can provide startup methods inside your modules. A startup method is a static or instance method of a module annotated with @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/annotations/Startup.html">Startup</a> annotation. Each module is allowed to contain several startup methods.<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class MyModule
+<p>&#160;</p></div>Instead of making contributions to the RegistryStartup service configuration you can provide startup methods inside your modules. A startup method is a static or instance method of a module annotated with @<a  class="external-link" href="http://tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/ioc/annotations/Startup.html">Startup</a> annotation. Each module is allowed to contain several startup methods.<parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class MyModule
 {
 
   @Startup
@@ -100,8 +89,7 @@
     service.init();
   }
 }
-</pre>
-</div></div><p>&#160;</p><p></p></div>
+</plain-text-body><p>&#160;</p><p></p></div>
       </div>
 
       <div class="clearer"></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-50.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-50.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-50.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,16 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushPlain.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -77,19 +67,12 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent">
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><plain-text-body>{scrollbar}</plain-text-body>
 
 <p>This is the consolidated list of changes between Tapestry versions 5.0.3 and 5.0.19. Before upgrading, be sure to review the <a  href="how-to-upgrade.html">How to Upgrade</a> instructions.</p>
 
 <p><strong>Contents</strong></p>
-<style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1499639566337 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1499639566337 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 5px;}
-div.rbtoc1499639566337 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
-
-/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1499639566337">
-<ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.19">Tapestry Version 5.0.19</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.18">Tapestry Version 5.0.18</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.17">Tapestry Version 5.0.17</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.16">Tapestry Version 5.0.16</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.15">Tapestry Version 5.0.15</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.14">Tapestry Version 5.0.14</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.13">Tapestry Version 5.0.13</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.12">Tapestry Version 5.0.12</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.11">Tapestry Version 5.0.11</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.10">Tapestry Version 5.0.10</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.9">Tapestry Version 5.0.9</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNot
 es5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.8">Tapestry Version 5.0.8</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.7">Tapestry Version 5.0.7</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.6">Tapestry Version 5.0.6</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.5">Tapestry Version 5.0.5</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.4">Tapestry Version 5.0.4</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.3">Tapestry Version 5.0.3</a></li></ul>
-</div>
+<parameter ac:name="maxLevel">2</parameter><parameter ac:name="minLevel">2</parameter><parameter ac:name="indent">5px</parameter>
 
 <h2 id="ReleaseNotes5.0-TapestryVersion5.0.19">Tapestry Version 5.0.19</h2>
 
@@ -431,7 +414,8 @@ div.rbtoc1499639566337 li {margin-left:
 
 <ul><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1276">TAPESTRY-1276</a> &#8211; If component should include an optional negate parameter</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1284">TAPESTRY-1284</a> &#8211; Tapestry Spring integration module</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1292">TAPESTRY-1292</a> &#8211; Allow lists to be used as select models</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1302">TAPESTRY-1302</a> &#8211; JavaScript support</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1311">TAPESTRY-1311</a> &#8211; Identify type of component via tag element name in templates</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1319">TAPESTRY-1319</a> &#8211; tapestry.InfrastructureOverrides is not yet implemented</li><li><a  cla
 ss="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1325">TAPESTRY-1325</a> &#8211; Add an "asset:" object provider, to simplfy injecting assets into services</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAPESTRY-1341">TAPESTRY-1341</a> &#8211; Allow service builders named "build" and determine service id from the result type</li></ul>
 
-</div>
+
+<plain-text-body>{scrollbar}</plain-text-body></div>
       </div>
 
       <div class="clearer"></div>

Modified: websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-51.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-51.html (original)
+++ websites/production/tapestry/content/release-notes-51.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:59 2017
@@ -27,16 +27,6 @@
       </title>
   <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/space.css" />
 
-          <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shCoreCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <link href='/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
-    <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-          <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushPlain.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-        <script>
-      SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
-      SyntaxHighlighter.all();
-    </script>
   
   <link href="/styles/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
 
@@ -77,19 +67,12 @@
       </div>
 
       <div id="content">
-                <div id="ConfluenceContent">
+                <div id="ConfluenceContent"><plain-text-body>{scrollbar}</plain-text-body>
 
 <p>This is the consolidated list of changes between Tapestry versions 5.0 and 5.1. Before upgrading, be sure to review the <a  href="how-to-upgrade.html">How to Upgrade</a> instructions.</p>
 
 <p><strong>Contents</strong></p>
-<style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1499639565943 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1499639565943 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1499639565943 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
-
-/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1499639565943">
-<ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.5">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.5</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.4">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.4</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.3">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.3</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.2">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.2</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.1">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.1</a></li><li><a  href="#ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.0">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.0</a></li></ul>
-</div>
+<parameter ac:name="maxLevel">2</parameter><parameter ac:name="minLevel">2</parameter>
 
 <h2 id="ReleaseNotes5.1-TapestryVersion5.1.0.5">Tapestry Version 5.1.0.5</h2>
 
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 <ul><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-372">TAP5-372</a> &#8211; Merge changes from 5.0.16 --&gt; 5.0.17 into trunk (5.1)</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-379">TAP5-379</a> &#8211; Add the Ars Machina Project to the list of Tapestry 5-related packages</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-381">TAP5-381</a> &#8211; Documentation talks about a "tapestry.charset" when there's no such configuration documented</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-480">TAP5-480</a> &#8211; Upgrade Surefire Plugin and TestNG dependencies to latest version (2.4.3 and 5.8, respectively)</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-493">TAP5-493</a> &#8211; Translate StructureStrings#original-child-component</li><li><a  class="external-link" href="https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/TAP5-
 494">TAP5-494</a> &#8211; Downgrade maven-site-plugin from 2.0-beta-6 to 2.0-beta-5 because we prefer a site that actually works</li></ul>
 
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