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From lyalya...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1815233 - /subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html
Date Tue, 14 Nov 2017 16:52:42 GMT
Author: lyalyakin
Date: Tue Nov 14 16:52:42 2017
New Revision: 1815233

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc?rev=1815233&view=rev
Log:
* publish/quickstart.html: Merge from staging.

Modified:
    subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html   (contents, props changed)

Modified: subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html?rev=1815233&r1=1815232&r2=1815233&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html (original)
+++ subversion/site/publish/quick-start.html Tue Nov 14 16:52:42 2017
@@ -14,433 +14,411 @@
 <!--#include virtual="/site-nav.html" -->
 <div id="site-content">
 <!--#include virtual="/site-notice.html" -->
+<!-- **************** BEGIN CONTENT ***************** -->
 
 <h1>Apache Subversion: Quick Start</h1>
 
 <ul>
-  <li>
-    <a href="#installing-the-client">Installing the SVN client</a>
-  </li>
-  <li>
-    <a href="#terminology">Terminology</a>
-  </li>
-  <li>
-    <a href="#basic-tasks">Basic tasks</a>
-  </li>
-  <li>
-    <a href="#branching-and-tagging">Branching and tagging</a>
-  </li>
-  <li>
-    <a href="#more-help">Getting more help</a>
-  </li>
+  <li><a href="#installing-the-client"
+      >Installing the SVN client</a></li>
+  <li><a href="#terminology"
+      >Terminology</a></li>
+  <li><a href="#basic-tasks"
+      >Basic tasks</a></li>
+  <li><a href="#branching-and-tagging"
+      >Branching and tagging</a></li>
+  <li><a href="#more-help"
+      >Getting more help</a></li>
 </ul>
 
-  <div class="h2" id="installing-the-client">
-    <h2>
-      Installing the SVN client
-      <a class="sectionlink" href="#installing-the-client"
-         title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-    </h2>
-    <p>
-      Install the <tt>svn</tt> client to start collaborating on a project
-      that is using Subversion as its version control system.
-    </p>
-    <p>
-      To install the client program, you can build it yourself from a source
-      code release or download a binary package.  The list of sites where you
-      can obtain a pre-built Subversion client is available at the
-      <a href="/packages.html">official binary packages page</a>.  If you want
-      to compile the software for yourself, grab the source at the
-      <a href="/source-code.html">Source Code</a> page.
-    </p>
-    <p>
-      Right after you install the client you should be able to test it by
-      issuing the svn command.  You should see the following output:
-    </p>
+<div class="h2" id="installing-the-client">
+<h2>Installing the SVN client
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#installing-the-client"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h2>
+
+<p>Install the <tt>svn</tt> client to start collaborating on a project
that
+is using Subversion as its version control system.</p>
+
+<p>To install the client program, you can build it yourself from a source
+code release or download a binary package.  The list of sites where you
+can obtain a pre-built Subversion client is available at the <a
+href="/packages.html">official binary packages page</a>.  If you want
+to compile the software for yourself, grab the source at the
+<a href="/source-code.html">Source Code</a> page.</p>
+
+<p>Right after you install the client you should be able to test it by
+issuing the svn command.  You should see the following output:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn
 Type 'svn help' for usage.
 </pre>
-    <p>
-      Now you can start using the command line client to interact with the 
-      remote repository.
-    </p>
-    <div class="notice">
-      <p>
-        If you are not familiar with Subversion, you may be better served by a
-        graphical client.  We do not maintain a list of such clients; instead,
-        we recommend you do a Web search for <tt>Subversion GUI</tt> client.
-      </p>
-    </div>
-  </div>
-
-  <div class="h2" id="terminology">
-    <h2>
-      Terminology
-      <a class="sectionlink" href="#terminology"
-         title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-    </h2>
-    <div class="h3" id="what-is-a-repository">
-      <h3>
-        What is a Repository?
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#what-is-a-repository"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        The repository is a version control database that often resides on a
-        server and is usually exposed either by an Apache HTTP Server
-        (through the <tt>mod_dav_svn</tt> module) or by an svnserve server.
-        The repository acts as a single source of truth and – as a central
-        storage – it contains the complete history of changes of the versioned
-        data in form of revisions.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        Repository URL examples:
-      </p>
-      <ul>
-        <li>
-          Apache HTTP Server: <tt>https://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/trunk</tt>
-        </li>
-        <li>
-          svnserve: <tt>svn://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/branches/MyBranch</tt>
-        </li>
-        <li>
-          Direct access (Unix-style): <tt>file://var/svn/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/tags/1.1.0</tt>
-        </li>
-        <li>
-          Direct access (Windows-style): <tt>file:///C:/Repositories/MyRepo/trunk/MyProject</tt>
-        </li>
-      </ul>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="what-is-a-working-copy">
-      <h3>
-        What is a Working Copy?
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#what-is-a-working-copy"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        The working copy is your local and private workspace that you use to
-        interact with the central Subversion repository.  You use the working
-        copy to modify the contents of your project and fetch changes committed
-        by others.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        The working copy contains your project's data and looks and acts like a
-        regular directory on your local file system, but with one major
-        difference - the working copy tracks the status and changes of files
-        and directories within.  You can think of the working copy as of a
-        regular directory with version-control capabilities.  A working copy
-        has an administrative directory named <tt>.svn</tt> at its root.  The
-        administrative directory contains metadata necessary for Subversion to
-        manage the version-control capabilities.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        There can be as much working copies from the same repository or project
-        as you want with any combination of local modifications.
-      </p>
-      </div>
-    </div>
-
-  <div class="h2" id="basic-tasks">
-    <h2>
-      Basic tasks
-      <a class="sectionlink" href="#basic-tasks"
-         title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-    </h2>
-    <div class="h3" id="importing-data">
-      <h3>
-        Importing data into the repository
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#importing-data"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        In case you want to import existing non-versioned data into an SVN
-        repository, you should run the
-        <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.import.html">
-        <tt>svn import</tt></a> command.  Here is an example:
-      </p>
+
+<p>Now you can start using the command line client to interact with the remote
+repository.</p>
+
+<div class="notice">
+<p>If you are not familiar with Subversion, you may be better served by a
+graphical client.  We do not maintain a list of such clients; instead,
+we recommend you do a Web search for <tt>Subversion GUI</tt> client.</p>
+</div>
+
+</div>  <!-- #installing-the-client -->
+
+<div class="h2" id="terminology">
+<h2>Terminology
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#terminology"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h2>
+
+<div class="h3" id="what-is-a-repository">
+<h3>What is a Repository?
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#what-is-a-repository"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>The repository is a version control database that often resides on a
+server and is usually exposed either by an Apache HTTP Server
+(through the <tt>mod_dav_svn</tt> module) or by an svnserve server.
+The repository acts as a single source of truth and &mdash; as a central
+storage &mdash; it contains the complete history of changes of the versioned
+data in form of revisions.</p>
+
+<p>Repository URL examples:</p>
+<ul>
+  <li>Apache HTTP Server:
+    <tt>https://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/trunk</tt></li>
+  <li>svnserve:
+    <tt>svn://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/branches/MyBranch</tt></li>
+  <li>Direct access (Unix-style):
+    <tt>file://var/svn/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/tags/1.1.0</tt></li>
+  <li>Direct access (Windows-style):
+    <tt>file:///C:/Repositories/MyRepo/trunk/MyProject</tt></li>
+</ul>
+
+</div>  <!-- #what-is-a-repository -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="what-is-a-working-copy">
+<h3>What is a Working Copy?
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#what-is-a-working-copy"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>The working copy is your local and private workspace that you use to
+interact with the central Subversion repository.  You use the working
+copy to modify the contents of your project and fetch changes committed
+by others.</p>
+
+<p>The working copy contains your project's data and looks and acts like a
+regular directory on your local file system, but with one major
+difference - the working copy tracks the status and changes of files
+and directories within.  You can think of the working copy as of a
+regular directory with version-control capabilities.  A working copy
+has an administrative directory named <tt>.svn</tt> at its root.  The
+administrative directory contains metadata necessary for Subversion to
+manage the version-control capabilities.</p>
+
+<p>There can be as much working copies from the same repository or project
+as you want with any combination of local modifications.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #what-is-a-working-copy -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #terminology -->
+
+<div class="h2" id="basic-tasks">
+<h2>Basic tasks
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#basic-tasks"
+    title ="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h2>
+
+<div class="h3" id="importing-data">
+<h3>Importing data into the repository
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#importing-data"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>In case you want to import existing non-versioned data into an SVN
+repository, you should run the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.import.html"
+  ><tt>svn import</tt></a> command.  Here is an example:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn import https://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/trunk -m "Initial project import"
 </pre>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="checking-out-a-working-copy">
-      <h3>
-        Checking out a working copy
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#checking-out-a-working-copy"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        To begin making modifications to your project's data, you have to
-        create a local copy of the versioned project.  You can use the command
-        line <tt>svn</tt> client or any GUI-based client that you prefer.  Your
-        local copy of the project is called a working copy and
-        you create it by issuing the
-        <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.checkout.html">
-        <tt>svn checkout</tt></a> command.  Here is an example:
-      </p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #importing-data -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="checking-out-a-working-copy">
+<h3>Checking out a working copy
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#checking-out-a-working-copy"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>To begin making modifications to your project's data, you have to
+create a local copy of the versioned project.  You can use the command
+line <tt>svn</tt> client or any GUI-based client that you prefer.  Your
+local copy of the project is called a working copy and
+you create it by issuing the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.checkout.html"
+><tt>svn checkout</tt></a> command.  Here is an example:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn checkout https://svn.example.com/repos/MyRepo/MyProject/trunk MyWorkingCopy
 </pre>
-      <p>
-        As a result, you will get a working copy of the trunk of a project
-        called MyProject that resides in MyRepo repository.  The working copy
-        will be located in MyWorkingCopy directory on your computer.  Note that
-        instead of checking out the trunk, you can check out some branch
-        or a tag (assuming they already exist in the repository).
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        You can get the working copy of the whole repository MyRepo, too.  But
-        you should refrain from doing so.  Generally speaking, you do not need
-        to have a working copy of the whole repository for your work because
-        your working copy can be instantly switched to another development
-        branch.  Moreover, Subversion repository can contain a number of 
-        unrelated projects and it is better to have a dedicated working copy
-        for each of them, not a single working copy for all of the projects.
-      </p>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="updating-a-working-copy">
-      <h3>
-        Updating a working copy 
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#updating-a-working-copy"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        You are not the only person working on the project, right?  This means
-        that your colleagues are also making modifications to the project's
-        data.  To stay up to date and to fetch the modifications committed by
-        others, you should run the
-        <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.update.html">
-        <tt>svn update</tt></a> command in your working copy.  As a result,
-        your working copy will sync with the repository and download the
-        changes made by your colleagues.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        It is a good practice to update your working copy before committing
-        local modifications to the repository.
-      </p>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="making-changes">
-      <h3>
-        Making changes in your local working copy
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#making-changes"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        Most of the time, you are going to perform modifications to the
-        project's data by modifying the contents of the working copy.  As soon
-        as you are satisfied with the modifications and you've reviewed them
-        thoroughly, you are ready to commit them to the central repository.
-      </p>
-      <div class="h4" id="modifying-existing-files">
-        <h4>
-          Modifying existing files
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#modifying-existing-files"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Modify the files as you usually do using your favorite text
-          processor, graphics editor, audio editing software, IDE, etc.  As
-          soon as you save the changes to disk, Subversion will recognize them
-          automatically.
-      </div>
-      <div class="h4" id="committing-changes">
-        <h4>
-          Committing your changes to the repository
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#committing-changes"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          In order to publish the changes you made in your working copy, you
-          should run the
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.commit.html">
-          <tt>svn commit</tt></a> command.
-        </p>
-        <div class="notice">
-          <p>
-            Review your changes before committing them!  Use the
-            <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.status.html">
-             <tt>svn status</tt></a> and
-            <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.diff.html">
-             <tt>svn diff</tt></a> commands to review the changes.
-          </p>
-        </div>
-          <p>
-            Here is an example of the commit command:
-          </p>
+
+<p>As a result, you will get a working copy of the trunk of a project
+called MyProject that resides in MyRepo repository.  The working copy
+will be located in MyWorkingCopy directory on your computer.  Note that
+instead of checking out the trunk, you can check out some branch
+or a tag (assuming they already exist in the repository).</p>
+
+<p>You can get the working copy of the whole repository MyRepo, too.  But
+you should refrain from doing so.  Generally speaking, you do not need
+to have a working copy of the whole repository for your work because
+your working copy can be instantly switched to another development
+branch.  Moreover, Subversion repository can contain a number of 
+unrelated projects and it is better to have a dedicated working copy
+for each of them, not a single working copy for all of the projects.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #checking-out-a-working-copy -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="updating-a-working-copy">
+<h3>Updating a working copy 
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#updating-a-working-copy"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>You are not the only person working on the project, right?  This means
+that your colleagues are also making modifications to the project's
+data.  To stay up to date and to fetch the modifications committed by
+others, you should run the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.update.html"
+><tt>svn update</tt></a> command in your working copy.  As a result,
+your working copy will sync with the repository and download the
+changes made by your colleagues.</p>
+
+<p>It is a good practice to update your working copy before committing
+local modifications to the repository.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #updating-a-working-copy -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="making-changes">
+<h3>Making changes in your local working copy
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#making-changes"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>Most of the time, you are going to perform modifications to the
+project's data by modifying the contents of the working copy.  As soon
+as you are satisfied with the modifications and you've reviewed them
+thoroughly, you are ready to commit them to the central repository.</p>
+
+<div class="h4" id="modifying-existing-files">
+<h4>Modifying existing files
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#modifying-existing-files"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Modify the files as you usually do using your favorite text
+processor, graphics editor, audio editing software, IDE, etc.  As
+soon as you save the changes to disk, Subversion will recognize them
+automatically.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #modifying-existing-files -->
+
+<div class="h4" id="committing-changes">
+<h4>Committing your changes to the repository
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#committing-changes"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>In order to publish the changes you made in your working copy, you
+should run the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.commit.html"
+><tt>svn commit</tt></a> command.</p>
+
+<div class="notice">
+<p>Review your changes before committing them!  Use the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.status.html"
+><tt>svn status</tt></a>
+and
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.diff.html"
+><tt>svn diff</tt></a> commands to review the changes.</p>
+</div>
+
+<p>Here is an example of the commit command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn commit -m "My Descriptive Log Message"
 </pre>
-          <p>
-            Note the <tt>-m (--message)</tt> option. You should always include
-            a descriptive commit log message.  It should help others including
-            yourself understand the reason why you made this commit.  It is a
-            good idea to include a summary of your changes in the log message,
-            too.
-          </p>
-      </div>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="performing-file-and-dir-operations">
-      <h3>
-        Performing file and directory operations
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#performing-file-and-dir-operations"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        You can perform any actions with your project's data within the working
-        copy, but operations that involve copying, moving, renaming and
-        deleting must be performed using the corresponding <tt>svn</tt>
-        commands.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        Subversion does not use heurisic-tracking for tree changes in a working
-        copy. Subversion requires explicit tracking of tree changes.  If you
-        perform a tree changes such as move or copy with regular filesystem
-        commands, Subversion will not know about this operation.  To track tree
-        changes Subversion should be made aware of them.
-      </p>
-      <div class="h4" id="adding-new-files-and-directories">
-        <h4>
-          Adding new files and directories
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#adding-new-files-and-directories"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Put new files or directories to the working copy and Subversion will
-          see them as "unversioned".  It will not automatically start tracking the new
-          files unless you run the
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.add.html">
-          <tt>svn add</tt></a> command:
-        </p>
+
+<p>Note the <tt>-m (--message)</tt> option. You should always include
+a descriptive commit log message.  It should help others including
+yourself understand the reason why you made this commit.  It is a
+good idea to include a summary of your changes in the log message, too.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #committing-changes -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #making-changes -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="performing-file-and-dir-operations">
+<h3>Performing file and directory operations
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#performing-file-and-dir-operations"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>You can perform any actions with your project's data within the working
+copy, but operations that involve copying, moving, renaming and
+deleting must be performed using the corresponding <tt>svn</tt>
+commands.</p>
+
+<p>Subversion does not use heurisic-tracking for tree changes in a working
+copy.  Subversion requires explicit tracking of tree changes.  If you
+perform a tree changes such as move or copy with regular filesystem
+commands, Subversion will not know about this operation.  To track tree
+changes Subversion should be made aware of them.</p>
+
+<div class="h4" id="adding-new-files-and-directories">
+<h4>Adding new files and directories
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#adding-new-files-and-directories"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Put new files or directories to the working copy and Subversion will
+see them as "unversioned".  It will not automatically start tracking
+the new files unless you run the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.add.html"
+><tt>svn add</tt></a> command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn add foo.cs
 </pre>
-      </div>
-      <div class="h4" id="moving-and-renaming-files-and-directories">
-        <h4>
-          Moving and renaming files and directories
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#moving-and-renaming-files-and-directories"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Move and rename files and directories using the
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.move.html">
-            <tt>svn move</tt></a> or <tt>svn rename</tt> command:
-        </p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #adding-new-files-and-directories -->
+
+<div class="h4" id="moving-and-renaming-files-and-directories">
+<h4>Moving and renaming files and directories
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#moving-and-renaming-files-and-directories"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Move and rename files and directories using the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.move.html"
+><tt>svn move</tt></a> or <tt>svn rename</tt> command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn move foo.cs bar.cs
 </pre>
-        <p>
-          The command <tt>svn rename</tt> is an alias for the
-          <tt>svn move</tt>.
-        </p>
-      </div>
-      <div class="h4" id="copying-files-and-directories">
-        <h4>
-          Copying files and directories
+
+<p>The command <tt>svn rename</tt> is an alias for the <tt>svn move</tt>.</p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #moving-and-renaming-files-and-directories -->
+
+<div class="h4" id="copying-files-and-directories">
+<h4>Copying files and directories
           <a class="sectionlink" href="#copying-files-and-directories"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Copy files and directories using the
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.copy.html">
-            <tt>svn copy</tt></a> command:
-        </p>
+          title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Copy files and directories using the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.copy.html"
+><tt>svn copy</tt></a> command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn copy foo.cs bar.cs
 </pre>
-      </div>
-      <div class="h4" id="deleting-files-and-directories">
-        <h4>
-          Deleting files and directories
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#deleting-files-and-directories"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Delete files and directories using the svn delete
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.delete.html">
-            <tt>svn delete</tt></a> command:
-        </p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #copying-files-and-directories -->
+
+<div class="h4" id="deleting-files-and-directories">
+<h4>Deleting files and directories
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#deleting-files-and-directories"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Delete files and directories using the svn delete
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.delete.html"
+><tt>svn delete</tt></a> command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn delete foo.cs
 </pre>
-      </div>
-      <div class="h4" id="reverting-local-changes">
-        <h4>
-          Reverting or discarding local changes
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#reverting-local-changes"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Discard your local uncommitted changes using the
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.revert.html">
-            <tt>svn revert</tt></a> command:
-        </p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #deleting-files-and-directories -->
+
+<div class="h4" id="reverting-local-changes">
+<h4>Reverting or discarding local changes
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#reverting-local-changes"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Discard your local uncommitted changes using the
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.ref.svn.c.revert.html"
+><tt>svn revert</tt></a> command:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn revert foo.cs
 </pre>
-        <div class="notice">
-          <p>
-            Discarded uncommitted changes will be lost forever.  You will not be
-            able to recover the reverted changes.  Use <tt>svn revert</tt> with
-            caution!
-          </p>
-        </div>
-      </div>
-    </div>
-    <div class="h3" id="branching-and-tagging">
-      <h3>
-        Branching and tagging
-        <a class="sectionlink" href="#branching-and-tagging"
-           title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-      </h3>
-      <p>
-        You should use the <tt>svn copy</tt> command to create branches and
-        tags.  This is the same command that is used to copy items in your
-        working copy and in the repository when you want them to be
-        historically related.
-      </p>
-      <p>
-        The command <tt>svn copy</tt> is used for branching because branch is
-        technically a copy of the source you copy from.  However, it is not
-        an ordinary copy that you are familiar with when copying files on your
-        local file system.  Branches in Subversion repositories are so called
-        <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.branchmerge.using.html#svn.branchmerge.using.create">
-        "Cheap Copies"</a> that are similar to symlinks.  Therefore, creating a
-        new branch takes minimal time to complete and takes practically no
-        space in the Subversion repository.  You can create branches and use
-        them for any change you want regardless of the change's size and scope.
-      </p>
-      <div class="h4" id="url-to-url-copy">
-        <h4>
-          Creating a branch using direct URL to URL copy
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#url-to-url-copy"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h4>
-        <p>
-          Branching in Subversion is simple.  In the simplest form, creating a
-          new branch requires you to run the command against the remote
-          repository's URLs.  For example, let's create a new branch out of the
-          mainline trunk:
-        </p>
+
+<div class="notice">
+<p>Discarded uncommitted changes will be lost forever.  You will not be
+able to recover the reverted changes.  Use <tt>svn revert</tt> with
+caution!
+</p>
+</div>
+
+</div>  <!-- #reverting-local-changes -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #performing-file-and-dir-operations -->
+
+<div class="h3" id="branching-and-tagging">
+<h3>Branching and tagging
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#branching-and-tagging"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h3>
+
+<p>You should use the <tt>svn copy</tt> command to create branches and
+tags.  This is the same command that is used to copy items in your
+working copy and in the repository when you want them to be
+historically related.</p>
+
+<p>The command <tt>svn copy</tt> is used for branching because branch is
+technically a copy of the source you copy from.  However, it is not
+an ordinary copy that you are familiar with when copying files on your
+local file system.  Branches in Subversion repositories are so called
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/svn.branchmerge.using.html#svn.branchmerge.using.create"
+>"Cheap Copies"</a> that are similar to symlinks.  Therefore, creating a
+new branch takes minimal time to complete and takes practically no
+space in the Subversion repository.  You can create branches and use
+them for any change you want regardless of the change's size and scope.</p>
+
+<div class="h4" id="url-to-url-copy">
+<h4>Creating a branch using direct URL to URL copy
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#url-to-url-copy"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h4>
+
+<p>Branching in Subversion is simple.  In the simplest form, creating a
+new branch requires you to run the command against the remote
+repository's URLs.  For example, let's create a new branch out of the
+mainline trunk:</p>
 <pre>
 $ svn copy https://example.com/MyRepo/trunk https://example.com/MyRepo/branches/MyNewBranch
-m "Creating a new branch"
 </pre>
-      </div>
-    </div>
-      <div class="h2" id="more-help">
-        <h2>
-          Getting more help
-          <a class="sectionlink" href="#more-help"
-             title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
-        </h2>
-        <p>
-          If you are new to Apache Subversion (SVN), read Version Control with
-          Subversion book (SVNBook).  SVNBook is the Bible of SVN and must-read
-          for Subversion users and administrators.  You can find SVNBook 1.8 at
-          <a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/">http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/</a>
-        </p>
-      </div>
-    </div>
-    </div> <!-- #site-content -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #url-to-url-copy -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #branching-and-tagging -->
+
+</div>  <!-- #basic-tasks -->
+
+<div class="h2" id="more-help">
+<h2>Getting more help
+  <a class="sectionlink" href="#more-help"
+    title="Link to this section">&para;</a>
+</h2>
+
+<p>If you are new to Apache Subversion (SVN), read Version Control with
+Subversion book (SVNBook).  SVNBook is the Bible of SVN and must-read
+for Subversion users and administrators.  You can find SVNBook 1.8 at
+<a href="http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/"
+>http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.8/</a></p>
+
+</div>  <!-- #more-help -->
+
+<!-- ***************** END CONTENT ****************** -->
+</div>  <!-- #site-content -->
 </body>
 </html>

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