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From hus...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r376838 [6/6] - in /struts/site/trunk/xdocs: announce.xml bylaws.xml download.xml downloads.xml faqs.xml helping.xml index.xml javadoc.xml kickstart.xml mail.xml navigation.xml release-checklist.xml releases.xml struts.css volunteers.xml
Date Fri, 10 Feb 2006 20:58:36 GMT
Modified: struts/site/trunk/xdocs/volunteers.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/struts/site/trunk/xdocs/volunteers.xml?rev=376838&r1=376837&r2=376838&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- struts/site/trunk/xdocs/volunteers.xml (original)
+++ struts/site/trunk/xdocs/volunteers.xml Fri Feb 10 12:58:33 2006
@@ -18,853 +18,1224 @@
 -->
 <document>
 
-   <properties>
-      <title>Who We Are</title>
-   </properties>
-
-   <body>
-      <section name="Who We Are">
-
-          <a name="statistics" />
-          <subsection name="List Subscribers and Downloads">
-
-            <p>In July 2005, there were more than 2800 subscribers to
-            STRUTS-USER (including the digest version). In addition to the
-            regular subscribers, an unknown number of developers read the lists
-            through newsfeed mirrors and through several list archives.</p>
-
-            <p>According to recently released
-            <a href="http://www.apache.org/~vgritsenko/stats/projects/struts">
-             statistics</a>, Struts downloads range around 15,000 a month.</p>
-         </subsection>
-
-         <a name="pmc" />
-         <subsection name="Project Management Committee Members">
-            <ul>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Craig R. McClanahan</strong>
-               (craigmcc at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Ted Husted</strong>
-               (husted at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Cedric Dumoulin</strong>
-               (cedric.dumoulin at lifl.fr)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Martin Cooper</strong>, Vice President and Chair
-               (martinc at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>James Holmes</strong>
-               (jholmes at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>David M. Karr</strong>
-               (dmkarr at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>David Graham</strong>
-               (dgraham at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>James Mitchell</strong>
-               (jmitchell at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Don Brown</strong>
-               (mrdon at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Joe Germuska</strong>
-               (germuska at apache.org)</li>
-
-                <li>
-                <strong>Niall Pemberton</strong>
-                (niallp at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Hubert Rabago</strong>
-               (hrabago at apache.org)</li>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Wendy Smoak</strong>
-               (wsmoak at apache.org)</li>
-            </ul>
-         </subsection>
-
-         <a name="committers" />
-         <subsection name="Committers">
-            <ul>
-
-               <li>
-               <strong>Eddie Bush</strong>
-               (ekbush at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>David Geary</strong>
-               (dgeary at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Gary VanMatre</strong>
-               (gvanmatre at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Sean Schofield</strong>
-               (schof at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Greg Reddin</strong>
-               (greddin at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Laurie Harper</strong>
-               (laurieh at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Richard Feit</strong>
-               (rich at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Jason Carreira</strong>
-               (jcarreira at apache.org)</li>
-               <li>
-               <strong>Patrick Lightbody</strong>
-               (plightbo at apache.org)</li>
-               </ul>
-         </subsection>
-
-         <a name="emeritus" />
-         <subsection name="Emeritus Committers">
-            <ul>
-               <li>Luis Arias</li>
-
-               <li>Pierre Delilse</li>
-
-               <li>Michael Schachter</li>
-
-               <li>Vincent Massol</li>
-
-               <li>David Winterfeldt</li>
-
-               <li>Oleg Alexeev</li>
-
-               <li>Rob Leland</li>
-
-               <li>Arron Bates</li>
-
-               <li>Steve Raeburn</li>
-
-               <li>James Turner</li>
-
-            </ul>
-         </subsection>
-
-         <a name="about" />
-         <subsection name="More About Us">
-            <h4 id="craigmcc">Craig R. McClanahan -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                I've been involved with servlet and JSP technology since around
-                1998. It started out that I needed a way to build some web
-                applications for several projects, and liked Java a lot better
-                than the alternatives. I also liked the price tag of open source
-                software, and started using Apache JServ -- later, getting
-                involved in the project (like many people, I was whining about
-                the twelve months it took to get from version 0.9 to version
-                1.0, and my son said "Dad, you know Java -- go help them finish
-                it!" -- so I did :-).</p>
-
-            <p>
-                For quite a while, I was participating a lot the JSP-INTEREST and
-                SERVLET-INTEREST
-                <a href="http://archives.java.sun.com">mailing lists</a>,
-                especially the topic of good architectures for web applications.
-                I was disgusted with the hash that many beginners created when
-                they used (or abused) scriptlets in JSP pages, and built (for my
-                former employer) a pretty comprehensive framework that could
-                considered ("Struts 0.01 without the custom tags"). It was
-                proprietary code, but I was able to describe the concepts, and
-                there started to a feeling the lists that this "Model 2" thing
-                was pretty cool -- but there were no good examples to look at,
-                so it was mostly hand waving types of discussions.</p>
-
-            <p>
-                Over the same time period, I got involved as an individual
-                contributor in the <a href="http://java.sun.com/jcp">Java
-                Community Process</a>, and joined the expert group that defined
-                the servlet 2.2 and JSP 1.1 specs. Sun was impressed enough to
-                offer me a job as the technical lead the team within Sun
-                (currently five other individuals) that works
-                <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat">Tomcat</a> -- the
-                architecture for Catalina, which is the servlet container part
-                of Tomcat 4.0, is also mine -- so I am in the really nice
-                position of getting paid to work open source software :-). And,
-                participate the expert groups for Servlet 2.3 and JSP 1.2. And,
-                speak at various conferences, including ApacheCon and JavaOne.
-                And, talk to groups within Sun about using Struts and
-                JSP/servlet technology. And ... (there's some really interesting
-                things being considered for the future).
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                The original design of what came to Struts has been in my head
-                for a long time, since those interesting mailing list
-                discussions, but the first version of the actual code was
-                written my laptop a Memorial Day weekend vacation trip (end of
-                May, 2000) to the Oregon coast -- in between watching the surf
-                and having the house shaken by a windstorm at night. Since then,
-                it has gathered attention and popularity as we approach our
-                first official release, and it delights me to see my "baby" grow
-                up so well :-). Of course, it is no longer just me -- there have
-                been incredible numbers of good ideas from all over, and a peek
-                at the TODO list for 1.1 says that even more good stuff is
-                coming in the future.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                One motivation factor was
-                <a href="http://www.servlets.com/soapbox/problems-jsp.html">
-                Jason Hunter's</a> article about the Problems with JSP. Jason
-                and I get along fine, even though we have different preferences
-                about presentation technologies. Besides being the author of a
-                very popular book about servlets, with a second edition coming
-                soon, Jason is also the representative for the Apache Software
-                Foundation the Executive Committee of the Java Community
-                Process.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                Personally, I live in Portland, Oregon (even though my team at
-                Sun is mostly in Cupertino, CA -- staying here was part of the
-                job deal :-). I like to support Oregon sports teams (Oregon
-                State Beavers, Oregon Ducks, Portland Trailblazers) and work
-                cool software.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                I figured out I was getting pretty old when I realized that
-                2000 was the 25th year I had been paid to work in some aspect of
-                software development :-). I've got a son who is a full-time
-                software developer (primarily in PHP so far, but I'm going to
-                corrupt him with Java eventually :-), and a daughter in college.
-                I'll happily let the other committers speak for themselves.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="mschachter">Mike Schachter -- Emeritus Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                I'm currently a student of computer science at Drexel University
-                in Philadelphia, PA. I've been working at HP Middleware,
-                formerly Bluestone Software for 3 years programming in Java and
-                recently J2EE technologies. I'm a full time worker from
-                September until April and a student and part time worker from
-                April until August. In my spare time I've been known to run
-                monkey-knife fights in a shady south philly warehouse. Err... I
-                mean... nothing.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="husted">Ted Husted -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                In the late 1990s, I was working with a local PBS station to
-                improve their web presence. Like most stations, WXXI had an
-                annual fundraising auction. Each year, we would do a little more
-                for the auction. At first, we posted a few static pages about
-                the "big ticket" items. The next year, we accepted "pre-bids"
-                on the more expensive items, using a JavaScript application.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                Then, late in 1999, the CEO decided we should do a lot more with the auction
-                on the website. The next big step would be to accept bids for
-                all items online. A colleague recommended FileMaker Pro, and we
-                went to work automating the bid-taking process. For
-                "Spring MarketPlace 2000", we entered the telephone bids into
-                computers in the studio, and Internet users could enter their
-                own bids directly.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                 The system worked, but we ran into some walls that were
-                 difficult to work around. We also wanted to expand the
-                 system to do scheduling and inventory as well as bid taking.
-                 So, I started looking for a new platform. I came close to
-                 selecting PHP, but there were some cool new Java products,
-                 like Resin and Jetty, coming out in 2000. I was impressed and
-                 decided to go with Java.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                 At the time, web application frameworks for Java were a new
-                 idea, and only a couple were available.
-                 I stumbled upon Struts at Jakarta, and started posting
-                 questions to the list. At first, the list traffic was so low,
-                 I wasn't sure if the group was still active. But, answers
-                 came, and so I kept on posting.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                 To help teach myself the framework, I started a "walking
-                 tour" of the infamous MailReader application. I posted the
-                 tour as I wrote it, and people kindly corrected my
-                 understanding of how things worked as I went.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                 In December 2000, Craig was asking for volunteers to help
-                 with the documentation. Mike Schachter and I raised our
-                 virtual hands, we became Struts committers 006 and 007.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                 By the Spring of 2001, WXXI's new auction application was ready
-                 to ship using the Struts 1.0 beta. We took over 50,000 bids on
-                 5,000 items with nary a hitch. We added an inventory module
-                 for 2002, and the station continued to use the original
-                 software unchanged through 2005.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                Since joining Struts in 2000, I've become a Member of the Apache
-                Software Foundation and Struts Project Management Committee. My
-                books include JUnit in Action, Struts in Action, and
-                Professional JSP Site Design. I've consulted with Struts teams
-                throughout the United States, including CitiGroup, Nationwide
-                Insurance, and the Pepsi Bottling Group.
-             </p>
-
-             <p>
-                Currently, I'm working with the Oklahoma State
-                Department of Environmental Services to improve their permitting
-                system. We started the work in Java, but the enterprise
-                migrated to ASP.NET in 2004. Rather than quit the team,
-                I stuck it out. We are now working on a Struts subproject for
-                ASP.NET called OverDrive.
-             </p>
-
-            <h4 id="cedric">Cedric Dumoulin -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                As a dreamer / researcher I have thought a lot about a framework
-                like Struts. But, as a lazy developer I have first checked what
-                already exists, and I have found Struts. Struts goals fulfilled
-                nearly all I needed for my (now old) portal project, except the
-                capability to reuse and assemble easily pieces of pages or
-                components. So, I have proposed the Components framework. This
-                framework can seen as a superset of the Templates tag library
-                contributed by David Geary, and contains lot of interesting
-                features.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                From a professional point of view, I have a Ph.D. in computer
-                science. I have worked for 3 years in the R&amp;D department of
-                a worldwide company developing Internet banking solutions.
-                I am now a researcher at a university, and work European
-                research projects. My main research interest is WWW, Distributed
-                Systems and Object Oriented Design. When developing code, I
-                always try to first propose reusable pieces of code.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="martinc">Martin Cooper -- PMC Chair</h4>
-
-            <p>
-              Early in the year 2000, I was asked, by my employer at that time,
-              to investigate the best way to develop a new web-based application
-              for the administration and management of an existing product.
-              After exploring a number of technologies, I settled on Java, along
-              with servlets and JSP, as the way to go. Then I started looking
-              for methodologies and "best practices", since others must surely
-              have been down that path before me.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              In addition to rummaging around on the web, I subscribed to the
-              SERVLET-INTEREST and JSP-INTEREST mailing lists, along with
-              several others, and monitored the discussions for a while. It was
-              clear that others were seeking the same answers as I was, and it
-              was also clear that many people were building their applications
-              in truly horrible ways.
-            </p>
-            <p>
-              At some point -- I don't recall when, exactly -- the concept of
-              "Model 1" versus "Model 2" applications came up, and there was a
-              great deal of discussion around that. Model 2 seemed very much
-              like A Good Thing to me, and I paid it close attention.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              Then, in May of 2000, I saw a message from Craig McClanahan
-              about a new framework called Struts that was designed to ease
-              the process of building Model 2 applications, and provide
-              solutions for some of the important issues at the same time. I
-              hopped on over to the web site and took a look around. This was
-              exactly what I had been looking for.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              My first postings to the Struts mailing list were, of course,
-              questions to help me understand how to do things and why Struts
-              is the way it is. Over time, I became more involved in both the
-              user and developer communities, started submitting bug reports,
-              patches and change requests, and eventually became a committer.
-              Not long after that, I volunteered to take on the release process,
-              and became the release manager for Struts 1.0.1 and beyond. Little
-              did I know what I was letting myself in for!
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              A large majority of the people who contribute to Apache projects
-              are volunteers who are not paid for their contributions. Like most
-              of those volunteers, I also have a "day job" to put bread on the
-              table. Currently, I am a UI Architect at Informatica, where I work
-              on the architecture, design and implementation of web applications.
-              Working with, and on, Struts has provided me with an excellent
-              perspective with which to do that!
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="dwinterfeldt">David Winterfeldt -- Emeritus Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                As I worked web based projects I started looking for something
-                that would really help save time during development. I ran
-                across Struts in the Summer of 2000 and decided it was a good
-                solution for web development. As I used Struts it really helped
-                to remove a lot of the repetitive work, but validation still
-                seemed very repetitive. I had an idea to create validation rules
-                in an xml file and have them easily integrated with Struts. It
-                started out simple and continued to develop over time. The
-                validation project was eventually incorporated into Struts and
-                the core was moved to Jakarta Commons. I'm happy to see Struts
-                continue to grow and develop.</p>
-
-            <p>
-                I currently am employed at Forbes.com. I occasionally get to do
-                some internal projects using Struts. The last interesting
-                project was a publishing system using Message Driven EJBs in
-                JBoss and Struts was used to display the status of each
-                publishing process.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="rleland">Rob Leland -- Emeritus PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                I have gone from Unix -to- Windows -to- Unix based development
-                about ever 6 years now. When moving to Windows I was amazed at
-                how primitive the OS was compared to Unix. While developing for
-                Win32 I had the pleasure of discovering Delphi and developed
-                many GUI/databases, telephony, Internet enabled applications. I
-                remain impressed with its design. Delphi, always enabled
-                development of a simple elegant solution, much like the language
-                itself. I was convinced after 10 years of development with C/C++
-                that it was a kinder gentler language.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                Then in July 2000 I decided to move into Java, and Web
-                development. This is after using the Internet since 1985 and
-                occasionally teaching classes about it. I was hired as a
-                consultant to take over a JSP based application. I realized it
-                had been written with the equivalent of "goto's"(Model 1) and
-                had to be redesigned. I searched for a better way to design the
-                code and by late August I had found Struts. It is also a simple
-                elegant solution.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                To date I have mainly served to pitch in where needed. I
-                continue to amazed at the Struts committers' generous
-                contributions of time, insight, and good will. I feel fortunate
-                to part of the struts team.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="dgraham">David Graham -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                I, like many others, discovered Struts when contemplating
-                writing my own MVC Java framework for the web. Struts had
-                everything I needed and more so I scrapped plans for my own and
-                joined the mailing lists. After playing with it for several
-                months I started submitting documentation and a few source
-                patches. I'm excited about helping Struts evolve and am
-                continually amazed by the framework and the community
-                surrounding it.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="jmitchell">James Mitchell -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                Struts was forced upon me when the E-Commerce sweat-shop...errr
-                ...I mean "the company I worked for" decided to go from being a
-                full fledged Microsoft Partner to a full J2EE shop.  That was
-                back in 2000.  What little skills in Java I had were poor at
-                best and I had never heard of Struts or even Tomcat for that
-                matter.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                I was fortunate to have several excellent mentors watching over
-                my shoulder and helping our team cross the "great divide"
-                between ASP/COM and Java/OOP.  You could say our mentors knew a
-                thing or two about Java, web development, and frameworks in
-                general.  Chuck Cavaness, Brian Keeton, and many more, I cannot
-                thank you enough for all the leadership and guidance you have
-                given me (and others).  I truly believe that without your help,
-                I would not be where I am today.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                Where am I today?  That depends on who you ask ;)  I own my own
-                business and I am currently working for a clientin the North
-                Atlanta (GA) area.  I created the
-                <a href="http://www.struts-atlanta.org">Struts-Atlanta Users
-                    Group</a> along with James Holmes several years ago with the
-                primary goal of mentoring, educating, and assisting other
-                developers.We are a large group (over 200 members) of Struts
-                enthusiasts and we meet monthly to discuss just about anything,
-                not just Struts.I don't want this to sound like a resume, but if
-                you are looking for talent,  I have helped several of our
-                membersfind jobs in our area.  Our list is a great resource for
-                finding and nurturing local talent.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                I call myself an "Open Source Evangelist" for a reason.  I use
-                the word "Evangelist" because that's what I feel I am doing.
-                Just as Martin Luther was considered a rebel in his day, I too
-                hope to make a change.  I hope to change the way Software is
-                developed in our world and how the lack of collaboration for
-                the sake of "intellectual property" is inhibiting the growth of
-                our economy. I believe businesses have a right to make a profit.
-                I believe businesshave a right to make a profit on their
-                "intellectual property", but for heaven's sake, some wheels
-                don't needto be reinvented 50,000 times.  Where I draw the line
-                is when they leverage existing market share to strong-arm the
-                competition literally out of business.  Based on what I just
-                wrote and depending on what you've been exposed to in your
-                career, you might be thinking of one company right now.  You are
-                probably right in your assumption, but believe me, there are
-                many companies that practice the same, or worsetechniques.  To
-                them, it's not about playing on a level playing field, it's
-                about getting to the game early,buying 80% of the seats, and
-                paying off the officials so there is little chance for any real
-                competition.  Ofcourse, for some companies, it doesn't hurt if
-                you own the stadium and keep the other players locked out.
-                "Well, they were invited to compete, but they didn't show up.
-                "....sound familiar?
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                Enter....the Open Source movement.  I would encourage you (if
-                you haven't already) to pick up a copy of
-                <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596001088/102-8250064-5792120">
-                    The Cathedral and the Bazaar</a>.This is an excellent
-                introduction to this whole "Open Source" thing and why it is so
-                popular.</p>
-
-            <p>
-                Compared to what I want to do in life, Struts is just a drop in
-                the pond.  However, that said, I am very happy and excited to be
-                a part of this (and other) open source projects.  Thanks for
-                putting up with me :P
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="jturner">James Turner -- Emeritus Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>
-                I discovered Struts somewhat by accident. In 2001 I began
-                writing a book for SAMS on JSP web development (MySQL and JSP
-                Web Development), and as part of it, I decided to write a
-                chapter on Struts in the advanced section. In the process of
-                learning enough about Struts to write about it, I realized that
-                it could simplify some of the projects that I was working on for
-                clients.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                After a half a year of working with Struts, I was asked by SAMS
-                to write another book, this time concentrating on Struts
-                specifically. That book, co-authored with a former co-worker n
-                amed Kevin Bedell, became Struts Kick Start.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                In the process of writing that book, I began to realize that
-                there were things I could do to contribute to Struts beyond
-                writing about it. One thing in particular was to clean up and
-                add some functionality to the Commons Validator project, which
-                eventually led to me release-managing (with a lot of help!) the
-                Commons Validator 1.0 release.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                More generally, I've been a software developer for over 22
-                years, starting with work as a Research Specialist at the MIT AI
-                Lab. I spent nearly a decade working in LISP, before moving on
-                to C/Unix, a stint managing the Web Site for the Christian
-                Science Monitor, and finally Java based e-Commerce development,
-                which has kept me busy for the last five years.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-                In addition to the two books mentioned above, I also write for a
-                number of publications, including WIRED and the aforementioned
-                Christian Science Monitor. You can get a look at my portfolio
-                <a href="http://www.blackbear.com/monitor.html">here</a>.  I'm
-                also working on a third book with a bunch of other folks for
-                O'Reilly, which will cover Apache Axis.  I also edit the
-                OpenSolaris.org site for Sun.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="ekbush">Eddie Bush -- Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>
-              My first experiences with Java made me wince.  The language
-              was young-ish still and growing by leaps and bounds all the time.
-              To me, it seemed unintelligent to invest any significant
-              intellectual resources in learning it because I perceived it as
-              such a &quot;moving target&quot;.  Of course, that has changed.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              I'd been looking for a way to really do heavy-duty processing of
-              web requests that was higher-level than CGI.  In particular, I
-              was on a quest to find somethiong that did not involve using
-              Microsoft (tm) technologies.  A friend of mine started
-              chatting up the idea of Java servlets and JSP pages.  I didn't
-              really like the idea of using Java because of my previously
-              formed opinion, but, having a great deal of respect for my
-              friend's opinion, I set out on an exursion to delve into the
-              world of Java-driven dynamic web page generation.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              The language (and myself) had matured considerably by this time,
-              and I found my previous inhibitions were no longer well founded.
-              However, as much as I liked the technology, I was dissatisfied.
-              There just had to be a better way!  I loved the concept of
-              having a controller servlet, but, lacking experience in building
-              externally-configurable Java &quot;thingies&quot;, I was
-              hard-coding a lot, and, after a point, that started to really
-              rub me wrong.  At this point, I started buying books and really
-              &quot;studying&quot; the technology more seriously.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              I honestly don't recall where I stumbled onto Struts, but I do
-              recall having toyed with a number of different frameworks - none
-              of which I really recall now.  I quickly fell in love with
-              Struts -- partially because it was an Apache project, and
-              partially because it was evident to me that the project had a
-              really great user-base.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              As time rocked along, I found myself becoming more deeply
-              involved in the project.  I studied the source and learned a
-              great deal about architecting configurable Java
-              &quot;thingies&quot;, and learned a fantastic amount about
-              actually using the framework.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              In time, I got comfortable enough with how Struts was structured
-              that I began submitting patches - mostly documentation, which
-              Ted Husted &quot;massaged&quot; and applied.  I enjoyed the
-              feeling of gratification I got from helping to make Struts
-              better, even if minorly.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              My last patch submitted as a non-committer was for ActionServlet.
-              This was back when Struts 1.1 was working toward GA release.  It
-              was the first patch I hadn't had applied within a few days of
-              submission and I grew impatient.  Modules did not work properly
-              without it and they did with it!  &quot;How can they not apply
-              that patch when it's so critical to Struts?&quot; I thought to
-              myself.
-            </p>
-
-            <p>
-              Well, to keep this book from becoming a novel, I started a
-              campaign to have the patch applied which resulted in
-              my gaining committer status and applying the patch myself!
-              I should note that Steve Ditlinger and myself collaborated on the
-              patch.  I submitted a version, he made some suggestions and
-              submitted an altered patch, and then we, collectively, decided
-              to make a couple of other modifications, which I applied just
-              before committing the patch.
-            </p>
-
-            <h4 id="niallp">Niall Pemberton -- PMC Member</h4>
-            <p>
-              I've worked as a developer since 1988 using various technologies/platforms.
-              In the late nineties I kept meaning to learn java but never found the time
-              until 2000. I bought a couple of books (Java in 30 Days and a Certification
-              Study Guide), passed the Sun certification exam and got my first java job.
-            </p>
-            <p>
-              Early in 2001 I was investigating writing the first web app for the company
-              I was working for and came across Struts - just before the 1.0 beta was
-              released. After a while I came off the user list because of the volume of
-              traffic and just monitored the developers list. Late in 2003 I migrated to
-              Struts 1.1, re-joined the user list and started submitting a few patches.
-              Was invited to become a Struts Committer in May 2004 and PMC member in
-              September 2004.
-            </p>
-
-             <h4 id="hrabago">Hubert Rabago -- PMC Member</h4>
-             <p>
-               I started working with Java early in 2000.  We designed and implemented a
-               servlet-based application that to this day gives me and a fellow designer
-               the urge to do a total rewrite.  On my next assignment, somebody
-               introduced me to a series of patterns useful for web applications.  We
-               built a framework using these patterns and it worked out well for us.
-             </p>
-             <p>
-               When I tried to bring this framework into the next project, somebody
-               suggested using Struts instead.  The two frameworks resembled each other
-               so closely that we had no trouble at all switching.  One of the things
-               missing in Struts was an easy way to do redirects with parameters, so we
-               wrote our own class for that.  The same guy who suggested Struts
-               suggested I contribute it to Struts.  A few months after that, I joined
-               the mailing lists and sought how to contribute.
-             </p>
-             <p>
-               I found myself enjoying answering questions on the user list.  After some
-               time, I was participating on the dev list as well.  Soon I was able to
-               contribute a few patches and even came up with my own Struts extension.
-               In February of 2005, I accepted an invitation to be a committer, and
-               in July 2005, accepted an invitation to join the PMC.
-             </p>
-
-            <h4 id="wsmoak">Wendy Smoak -- PMC Member</h4>
-
-            <p>In late 2001, I was asked to put information from a database on
-            the web, including a few forms to allow updates. By that time I had
-            been working with Java for a couple of years in class projects, but
-            "Servlet" was still a foreign word. With no real deadline and
-            complete freedom to pick anything I wanted, I spent hours online
-            searching and participating in different forums and lists. And any
-            time I asked for advice using 'Java' and 'HTML forms' in the same
-            sentence, I got a resounding chorus of "Struts!" in reply.</p>
-
-            <p>That first webapp went through quite a few iterations as I tried
-            and discarded various things. But I kept coming back to Struts, and
-            eventually things fell into place-- thanks mostly to the helpful
-            community on the struts-user list. As I gained more experience,
-            asking questions on the user list naturally transformed into
-            answering them, which I've been doing ever since. I accepted an
-            invitation to become a Struts Committer in June, 2005, and
-            was invited to join the PMC in December, 2005.</p>
-
-            <h4 id="gvanmatre">Gary VanMatre -- Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>I landed an internship in college working with the big blue iron where
-            I dappled in the craft of VSE COBOL and JCL. Through the 90's, I worked my
-            way into several client-server technologies (Visual Basic, PowerBuilder and Delphi)
-            and finally thought that I had learned the last programming language I
-            would ever need to know, Fort&#233; Transactional Object Oriented language (TOOL).</p>
-
-            <p>I rode the Fort&#233; wave for several years and suddenly found myself
-            looking for work and feeling like a real "tool". An empty, dust free
-            self was just the right size for the proprietary distributed object
-            solution once called Fort&#233;.</p>
-
-            <p>In 2002, is when I found Java. While working a VB assignment,
-            I decided the only hope I had of getting a competitive edge was to
-            become a Sun Certified Java Programmer. With that card, I found an
-            opportunity to become a Struts developer and began lurking about the
-            Struts mailing lists in 2003.</p>
-
-            <p>In late 2004, I started hearing a buzz about a new Struts subproject
-            and became very interested in the ideas. I also began acquiring a stack
-            of JSF books matching my Struts collection.  My experience with Struts,
-            Tiles and something that Colorado Department of State calls Rustts, gave
-            me the idea that has become known as the Shale "Clay" plug-in. I was
-            invited to become a Struts Committer in July 2005.</p>
-
-            <h4 id="schof">Sean Schofield -- Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>During a job interview in 2002 I was asked if I had any experience with
-            Struts.  I told the interviewer that I had never heard of it.  That night
-            when I got home I set out to figure out what Struts was all about.  It
-            turns out I already knew it (sort of.)  I had been spending a lot of time
-            researching design patterns and I was working with my own custom framework
-            that combined several patterns that I thought worked well together.</p>
-
-            <p>I then realized that I wasn't the only one trying to improve the way in
-            which complex web applications were being designed.  Of course, as with all
-            open source projects, the result of several minds working together is superior
-            to that of a single mind working alone.  I quickly abandoned my custom
-            framework in favor of Struts.  A few years later I was the one interviewing
-            people asking them if they knew Struts!</p>
-
-            <p>Struts was also the beginning of my serious interest in open source.  Like
-            many other committers I started out as a user, then became a participant on
-            the mailing lists, then started reporting bugs, then started patching bugs and
-            finally started proposing and supplying new features.  The Struts community
-            was an invaluable resource for me, especially when it came to getting advice on
-            tricky design issues.</p>
-
-            <p>In October 2005 I was invited to become a Struts Committer.  I have also been
-            involved in a few other open source projects including commons-lang and
-            commons-chain.  I am also a PMC member of the MyFaces project where I spend
-            most of my free time these days.  My current interest in Struts lies with the
-            Shale subproject.</p>
-
-            <h4 id="greddin">Greg Reddin -- Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>In early 2000 I was working on a client-server application that
-            was written in Visual Basic and C++.  The decision was made to
-            rebuild the application as a web-based app using Java and JSP.  We
-            bought into the MVC architecture and implemented it using Sun's
-            Blueprints with a JSP front controller.  Then one of our architects
-            came back from JavaOne raving about Struts.  From that point on
-            there was no turning back for me.</p>
-
-            <p>Over the years my involvement has come in spurts.  If I was
-            working on a web-based project it was a given that this project
-            would involve Struts.  Finally, our organization was bitten by the
-            SOA bug so it was "webapp no more" for a while.  But I never
-            bothered to unsubscribe from the Struts lists and always kept one
-            ear tuned in to the chatter in my inbox.</p>
-
-            <p>Finally I decided to plant myself back in the web tier with or
-            without my employer's support and changed jobs.  Very soon
-            afterwards, in October 2005, I was invited to become a Struts
-            committer.  This comes at a time when Tiles, my favorite part of
-            Struts, is seeing a lot of activity.  I hope to play a large part
-            in digging the Standalone version out of the sandbox.  I am also
-            very interested in JSF, Shale, content management systems, and
-            portals.</p>
-
-            <p>The truth is I still haven't decided what I want to be when I
-            grow up.  In addition to my software pursuits I am also a
-            <a href="http://www.reddin.org">family man</a> and a
-            <a href="http://www.fattuesdayaudio.com">musician</a>.  If anyone
-            knows of any good methods of cloning yourself, please let me know!
-            I'm happy to be a part of this community and the Apache
-            Way.</p>
-
-            <h4 id="laurieh">Laurie Harper -- Committer</h4>
-
-            <p>I've been lurking on the fringes of the Struts project for
-            years, on and off, but it wasn't until early 2005 that I
-            became an active participant. I founded
-            <a href="http://www.zotechsoftware.com/">Zotech Software</a>
-            and selected Struts as the framework on which we would build
-            our first product. I thought long and hard about how to give
-            back to the Open Source community from whose work we would
-            derive so much value, and decided that one important
-            contribution I could make would be to answer questions on
-            the Struts user list, among others. Over time, I found myself
-            wanting to add bits and pieces to Struts itself, and began
-            submitting patches.</p>
-
-            <p>In October 2005 I was invited to become a committer. My
-            main interests lie with the core Struts framework and supporting
-            sub-projects, though I'm keeping an eye on Ti and some of the
-            other experimental work that's going on.</p>
-
-         </subsection>
-      </section>
-   </body>
+    <properties>
+        <title>Who We Are</title>
+    </properties>
+
+    <body>
+        <section name="Who We Are">
+
+            <a name="statistics"/>
+            <subsection name="List Subscribers and Downloads">
+
+                <p>In July 2005, there were more than 2800 subscribers to
+                    STRUTS-USER (including the digest version). In addition to
+                    the
+                    regular subscribers, an unknown number of developers read
+                    the lists
+                    through newsfeed mirrors and through several list
+                    archives.</p>
+
+                <p>According to recently released
+                    <a href="http://www.apache.org/~vgritsenko/stats/projects/struts">
+                        statistics</a>
+                    , Struts downloads range around 15,000 a month.
+                </p>
+            </subsection>
+
+            <a name="pmc"/>
+            <subsection name="Project Management Committee Members">
+                <ul>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Craig R. McClanahan</strong>
+                        (craigmcc at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Ted Husted</strong>
+                        (husted at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Cedric Dumoulin</strong>
+                        (cedric.dumoulin at lifl.fr)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Martin Cooper</strong>
+                        , Vice President and Chair
+                        (martinc at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>James Holmes</strong>
+                        (jholmes at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>David M. Karr</strong>
+                        (dmkarr at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>David Graham</strong>
+                        (dgraham at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>James Mitchell</strong>
+                        (jmitchell at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Don Brown</strong>
+                        (mrdon at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Joe Germuska</strong>
+                        (germuska at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Niall Pemberton</strong>
+                        (niallp at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Hubert Rabago</strong>
+                        (hrabago at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Wendy Smoak</strong>
+                        (wsmoak at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                </ul>
+            </subsection>
+
+            <a name="committers"/>
+            <subsection name="Committers">
+                <ul>
+
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Eddie Bush</strong>
+                        (ekbush at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>David Geary</strong>
+                        (dgeary at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Gary VanMatre</strong>
+                        (gvanmatre at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Sean Schofield</strong>
+                        (schof at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Greg Reddin</strong>
+                        (greddin at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Laurie Harper</strong>
+                        (laurieh at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Richard Feit</strong>
+                        (rich at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Jason Carreira</strong>
+                        (jcarreira at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                    <li>
+                        <strong>Patrick Lightbody</strong>
+                        (plightbo at apache.org)
+                    </li>
+                </ul>
+            </subsection>
+
+            <a name="emeritus"/>
+            <subsection name="Emeritus Committers">
+                <ul>
+                    <li>Luis Arias</li>
+
+                    <li>Pierre Delilse</li>
+
+                    <li>Michael Schachter</li>
+
+                    <li>Vincent Massol</li>
+
+                    <li>David Winterfeldt</li>
+
+                    <li>Oleg Alexeev</li>
+
+                    <li>Rob Leland</li>
+
+                    <li>Arron Bates</li>
+
+                    <li>Steve Raeburn</li>
+
+                    <li>James Turner</li>
+
+                </ul>
+            </subsection>
+
+            <a name="about"/>
+            <subsection name="More About Us">
+                <h4 id="craigmcc">Craig R. McClanahan -- PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    I've been involved with servlet and JSP technology since
+                    around
+                    1998. It started out that I needed a way to build some web
+                    applications for several projects, and liked Java a lot
+                    better
+                    than the alternatives. I also liked the price tag of open
+                    source
+                    software, and started using Apache JServ -- later, getting
+                    involved in the project (like many people, I was whining
+                    about
+                    the twelve months it took to get from version 0.9 to
+                    version
+                    1.0, and my son said "Dad, you know Java -- go help them
+                    finish
+                    it!" -- so I did :-).</p>
+
+                <p>
+                    For quite a while, I was participating a lot the
+                    JSP-INTEREST and
+                    SERVLET-INTEREST
+                    <a href="http://archives.java.sun.com">mailing lists</a>
+                    ,
+                    especially the topic of good architectures for web
+                    applications.
+                    I was disgusted with the hash that many beginners created
+                    when
+                    they used (or abused) scriptlets in JSP pages, and built
+                    (for my
+                    former employer) a pretty comprehensive framework that
+                    could
+                    considered ("Struts 0.01 without the custom tags"). It was
+                    proprietary code, but I was able to describe the concepts,
+                    and
+                    there started to a feeling the lists that this "Model 2"
+                    thing
+                    was pretty cool -- but there were no good examples to look
+                    at,
+                    so it was mostly hand waving types of discussions.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Over the same time period, I got involved as an individual
+                    contributor in the
+                    <a href="http://java.sun.com/jcp">Java
+                        Community Process</a>
+                    , and joined the expert group that defined
+                    the servlet 2.2 and JSP 1.1 specs. Sun was impressed
+                    enough to
+                    offer me a job as the technical lead the team within Sun
+                    (currently five other individuals) that works
+                    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat">Tomcat</a>
+                    -- the
+                    architecture for Catalina, which is the servlet container
+                    part
+                    of Tomcat 4.0, is also mine -- so I am in the really nice
+                    position of getting paid to work open source software :-).
+                    And,
+                    participate the expert groups for Servlet 2.3 and JSP 1.2.
+                    And,
+                    speak at various conferences, including ApacheCon and
+                    JavaOne.
+                    And, talk to groups within Sun about using Struts and
+                    JSP/servlet technology. And ... (there's some really
+                    interesting
+                    things being considered for the future).
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    The original design of what came to Struts has been in my
+                    head
+                    for a long time, since those interesting mailing list
+                    discussions, but the first version of the actual code was
+                    written my laptop a Memorial Day weekend vacation trip
+                    (end of
+                    May, 2000) to the Oregon coast -- in between watching the
+                    surf
+                    and having the house shaken by a windstorm at night. Since
+                    then,
+                    it has gathered attention and popularity as we approach
+                    our
+                    first official release, and it delights me to see my
+                    "baby" grow
+                    up so well :-). Of course, it is no longer just me --
+                    there have
+                    been incredible numbers of good ideas from all over, and a
+                    peek
+                    at the TODO list for 1.1 says that even more good stuff is
+                    coming in the future.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    One motivation factor was
+                    <a href="http://www.servlets.com/soapbox/problems-jsp.html">
+                        Jason Hunter's</a>
+                    article about the Problems with JSP. Jason
+                    and I get along fine, even though we have different
+                    preferences
+                    about presentation technologies. Besides being the author
+                    of a
+                    very popular book about servlets, with a second edition
+                    coming
+                    soon, Jason is also the representative for the Apache
+                    Software
+                    Foundation the Executive Committee of the Java Community
+                    Process.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Personally, I live in Portland, Oregon (even though my
+                    team at
+                    Sun is mostly in Cupertino, CA -- staying here was part of
+                    the
+                    job deal :-). I like to support Oregon sports teams
+                    (Oregon
+                    State Beavers, Oregon Ducks, Portland Trailblazers) and
+                    work
+                    cool software.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I figured out I was getting pretty old when I realized
+                    that
+                    2000 was the 25th year I had been paid to work in some
+                    aspect of
+                    software development :-). I've got a son who is a
+                    full-time
+                    software developer (primarily in PHP so far, but I'm going
+                    to
+                    corrupt him with Java eventually :-), and a daughter in
+                    college.
+                    I'll happily let the other committers speak for
+                    themselves.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="mschachter">Mike Schachter -- Emeritus Committer</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    I'm currently a student of computer science at Drexel
+                    University
+                    in Philadelphia, PA. I've been working at HP Middleware,
+                    formerly Bluestone Software for 3 years programming in
+                    Java and
+                    recently J2EE technologies. I'm a full time worker from
+                    September until April and a student and part time worker
+                    from
+                    April until August. In my spare time I've been known to
+                    run
+                    monkey-knife fights in a shady south philly warehouse.
+                    Err... I
+                    mean... nothing.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="husted">Ted Husted -- PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    In the late 1990s, I was working with a local PBS station
+                    to
+                    improve their web presence. Like most stations, WXXI had
+                    an
+                    annual fundraising auction. Each year, we would do a
+                    little more
+                    for the auction. At first, we posted a few static pages
+                    about
+                    the "big ticket" items. The next year, we accepted
+                    "pre-bids"
+                    on the more expensive items, using a JavaScript
+                    application.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Then, late in 1999, the CEO decided we should do a lot
+                    more with the auction
+                    on the website. The next big step would be to accept bids
+                    for
+                    all items online. A colleague recommended FileMaker Pro,
+                    and we
+                    went to work automating the bid-taking process. For
+                    "Spring MarketPlace 2000", we entered the telephone bids
+                    into
+                    computers in the studio, and Internet users could enter
+                    their
+                    own bids directly.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    The system worked, but we ran into some walls that were
+                    difficult to work around. We also wanted to expand the
+                    system to do scheduling and inventory as well as bid
+                    taking.
+                    So, I started looking for a new platform. I came close to
+                    selecting PHP, but there were some cool new Java products,
+                    like Resin and Jetty, coming out in 2000. I was impressed
+                    and
+                    decided to go with Java.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    At the time, web application frameworks for Java were a
+                    new
+                    idea, and only a couple were available.
+                    I stumbled upon Struts at Jakarta, and started posting
+                    questions to the list. At first, the list traffic was so
+                    low,
+                    I wasn't sure if the group was still active. But, answers
+                    came, and so I kept on posting.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    To help teach myself the framework, I started a "walking
+                    tour" of the infamous MailReader application. I posted the
+                    tour as I wrote it, and people kindly corrected my
+                    understanding of how things worked as I went.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    In December 2000, Craig was asking for volunteers to help
+                    with the documentation. Mike Schachter and I raised our
+                    virtual hands, we became Struts committers 006 and 007.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    By the Spring of 2001, WXXI's new auction application was
+                    ready
+                    to ship using the Struts 1.0 beta. We took over 50,000
+                    bids on
+                    5,000 items with nary a hitch. We added an inventory
+                    module
+                    for 2002, and the station continued to use the original
+                    software unchanged through 2005.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Since joining Struts in 2000, I've become a Member of the
+                    Apache
+                    Software Foundation and Struts Project Management
+                    Committee. My
+                    books include JUnit in Action, Struts in Action, and
+                    Professional JSP Site Design. I've consulted with Struts
+                    teams
+                    throughout the United States, including CitiGroup,
+                    Nationwide
+                    Insurance, and the Pepsi Bottling Group.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Currently, I'm working with the Oklahoma State
+                    Department of Environmental Services to improve their
+                    permitting
+                    system. We started the work in Java, but the enterprise
+                    migrated to ASP.NET in 2004. Rather than quit the team,
+                    I stuck it out. We are now working on a Struts subproject
+                    for
+                    ASP.NET called OverDrive.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="cedric">Cedric Dumoulin -- PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    As a dreamer / researcher I have thought a lot about a
+                    framework
+                    like Struts. But, as a lazy developer I have first checked
+                    what
+                    already exists, and I have found Struts. Struts goals
+                    fulfilled
+                    nearly all I needed for my (now old) portal project,
+                    except the
+                    capability to reuse and assemble easily pieces of pages or
+                    components. So, I have proposed the Components framework.
+                    This
+                    framework can seen as a superset of the Templates tag
+                    library
+                    contributed by David Geary, and contains lot of
+                    interesting
+                    features.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    From a professional point of view, I have a Ph.D. in
+                    computer
+                    science. I have worked for 3 years in the R&amp;D
+                    department of
+                    a worldwide company developing Internet banking solutions.
+                    I am now a researcher at a university, and work European
+                    research projects. My main research interest is WWW,
+                    Distributed
+                    Systems and Object Oriented Design. When developing code,
+                    I
+                    always try to first propose reusable pieces of code.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="martinc">Martin Cooper -- PMC Chair</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    Early in the year 2000, I was asked, by my employer at
+                    that time,
+                    to investigate the best way to develop a new web-based
+                    application
+                    for the administration and management of an existing
+                    product.
+                    After exploring a number of technologies, I settled on
+                    Java, along
+                    with servlets and JSP, as the way to go. Then I started
+                    looking
+                    for methodologies and "best practices", since others must
+                    surely
+                    have been down that path before me.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    In addition to rummaging around on the web, I subscribed
+                    to the
+                    SERVLET-INTEREST and JSP-INTEREST mailing lists, along
+                    with
+                    several others, and monitored the discussions for a while.
+                    It was
+                    clear that others were seeking the same answers as I was,
+                    and it
+                    was also clear that many people were building their
+                    applications
+                    in truly horrible ways.
+                </p>
+                <p>
+                    At some point -- I don't recall when, exactly -- the
+                    concept of
+                    "Model 1" versus "Model 2" applications came up, and there
+                    was a
+                    great deal of discussion around that. Model 2 seemed very
+                    much
+                    like A Good Thing to me, and I paid it close attention.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Then, in May of 2000, I saw a message from Craig
+                    McClanahan
+                    about a new framework called Struts that was designed to
+                    ease
+                    the process of building Model 2 applications, and provide
+                    solutions for some of the important issues at the same
+                    time. I
+                    hopped on over to the web site and took a look around.
+                    This was
+                    exactly what I had been looking for.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    My first postings to the Struts mailing list were, of
+                    course,
+                    questions to help me understand how to do things and why
+                    Struts
+                    is the way it is. Over time, I became more involved in
+                    both the
+                    user and developer communities, started submitting bug
+                    reports,
+                    patches and change requests, and eventually became a
+                    committer.
+                    Not long after that, I volunteered to take on the release
+                    process,
+                    and became the release manager for Struts 1.0.1 and
+                    beyond. Little
+                    did I know what I was letting myself in for!
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    A large majority of the people who contribute to Apache
+                    projects
+                    are volunteers who are not paid for their contributions.
+                    Like most
+                    of those volunteers, I also have a "day job" to put bread
+                    on the
+                    table. Currently, I am a UI Architect at Informatica,
+                    where I work
+                    on the architecture, design and implementation of web
+                    applications.
+                    Working with, and on, Struts has provided me with an
+                    excellent
+                    perspective with which to do that!
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="dwinterfeldt">David Winterfeldt -- Emeritus
+                    Committer</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    As I worked web based projects I started looking for
+                    something
+                    that would really help save time during development. I ran
+                    across Struts in the Summer of 2000 and decided it was a
+                    good
+                    solution for web development. As I used Struts it really
+                    helped
+                    to remove a lot of the repetitive work, but validation
+                    still
+                    seemed very repetitive. I had an idea to create validation
+                    rules
+                    in an xml file and have them easily integrated with
+                    Struts. It
+                    started out simple and continued to develop over time. The
+                    validation project was eventually incorporated into Struts
+                    and
+                    the core was moved to Jakarta Commons. I'm happy to see
+                    Struts
+                    continue to grow and develop.</p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I currently am employed at Forbes.com. I occasionally get
+                    to do
+                    some internal projects using Struts. The last interesting
+                    project was a publishing system using Message Driven EJBs
+                    in
+                    JBoss and Struts was used to display the status of each
+                    publishing process.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="rleland">Rob Leland -- Emeritus PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    I have gone from Unix -to- Windows -to- Unix based
+                    development
+                    about ever 6 years now. When moving to Windows I was
+                    amazed at
+                    how primitive the OS was compared to Unix. While
+                    developing for
+                    Win32 I had the pleasure of discovering Delphi and
+                    developed
+                    many GUI/databases, telephony, Internet enabled
+                    applications. I
+                    remain impressed with its design. Delphi, always enabled
+                    development of a simple elegant solution, much like the
+                    language
+                    itself. I was convinced after 10 years of development with
+                    C/C++
+                    that it was a kinder gentler language.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Then in July 2000 I decided to move into Java, and Web
+                    development. This is after using the Internet since 1985
+                    and
+                    occasionally teaching classes about it. I was hired as a
+                    consultant to take over a JSP based application. I
+                    realized it
+                    had been written with the equivalent of "goto's"(Model 1)
+                    and
+                    had to be redesigned. I searched for a better way to
+                    design the
+                    code and by late August I had found Struts. It is also a
+                    simple
+                    elegant solution.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    To date I have mainly served to pitch in where needed. I
+                    continue to amazed at the Struts committers' generous
+                    contributions of time, insight, and good will. I feel
+                    fortunate
+                    to part of the struts team.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="dgraham">David Graham -- PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    I, like many others, discovered Struts when contemplating
+                    writing my own MVC Java framework for the web. Struts had
+                    everything I needed and more so I scrapped plans for my
+                    own and
+                    joined the mailing lists. After playing with it for
+                    several
+                    months I started submitting documentation and a few source
+                    patches. I'm excited about helping Struts evolve and am
+                    continually amazed by the framework and the community
+                    surrounding it.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="jmitchell">James Mitchell -- PMC Member</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    Struts was forced upon me when the E-Commerce
+                    sweat-shop...errr
+                    ...I mean "the company I worked for" decided to go from
+                    being a
+                    full fledged Microsoft Partner to a full J2EE shop. That
+                    was
+                    back in 2000. What little skills in Java I had were poor
+                    at
+                    best and I had never heard of Struts or even Tomcat for
+                    that
+                    matter.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I was fortunate to have several excellent mentors watching
+                    over
+                    my shoulder and helping our team cross the "great divide"
+                    between ASP/COM and Java/OOP. You could say our mentors
+                    knew a
+                    thing or two about Java, web development, and frameworks
+                    in
+                    general. Chuck Cavaness, Brian Keeton, and many more, I
+                    cannot
+                    thank you enough for all the leadership and guidance you
+                    have
+                    given me (and others). I truly believe that without your
+                    help,
+                    I would not be where I am today.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Where am I today? That depends on who you ask ;) I own my
+                    own
+                    business and I am currently working for a clientin the
+                    North
+                    Atlanta (GA) area. I created the
+                    <a href="http://www.struts-atlanta.org">Struts-Atlanta
+                        Users
+                        Group</a>
+                    along with James Holmes several years ago with the
+                    primary goal of mentoring, educating, and assisting other
+                    developers.We are a large group (over 200 members) of
+                    Struts
+                    enthusiasts and we meet monthly to discuss just about
+                    anything,
+                    not just Struts.I don't want this to sound like a resume,
+                    but if
+                    you are looking for talent, I have helped several of our
+                    membersfind jobs in our area. Our list is a great resource
+                    for
+                    finding and nurturing local talent.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I call myself an "Open Source Evangelist" for a reason. I
+                    use
+                    the word "Evangelist" because that's what I feel I am
+                    doing.
+                    Just as Martin Luther was considered a rebel in his day, I
+                    too
+                    hope to make a change. I hope to change the way Software
+                    is
+                    developed in our world and how the lack of collaboration
+                    for
+                    the sake of "intellectual property" is inhibiting the
+                    growth of
+                    our economy. I believe businesses have a right to make a
+                    profit.
+                    I believe businesshave a right to make a profit on their
+                    "intellectual property", but for heaven's sake, some
+                    wheels
+                    don't needto be reinvented 50,000 times. Where I draw the
+                    line
+                    is when they leverage existing market share to strong-arm
+                    the
+                    competition literally out of business. Based on what I
+                    just
+                    wrote and depending on what you've been exposed to in your
+                    career, you might be thinking of one company right now.
+                    You are
+                    probably right in your assumption, but believe me, there
+                    are
+                    many companies that practice the same, or worsetechniques.
+                    To
+                    them, it's not about playing on a level playing field,
+                    it's
+                    about getting to the game early,buying 80% of the seats,
+                    and
+                    paying off the officials so there is little chance for any
+                    real
+                    competition. Ofcourse, for some companies, it doesn't hurt
+                    if
+                    you own the stadium and keep the other players locked out.
+                    "Well, they were invited to compete, but they didn't show
+                    up.
+                    "....sound familiar?
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Enter....the Open Source movement. I would encourage you
+                    (if
+                    you haven't already) to pick up a copy of
+                    <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596001088/102-8250064-5792120">
+                        The Cathedral and the Bazaar</a>
+                    .This is an excellent
+                    introduction to this whole "Open Source" thing and why it
+                    is so
+                    popular.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Compared to what I want to do in life, Struts is just a
+                    drop in
+                    the pond. However, that said, I am very happy and excited
+                    to be
+                    a part of this (and other) open source projects. Thanks
+                    for
+                    putting up with me :P
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="jturner">James Turner -- Emeritus Committer</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    I discovered Struts somewhat by accident. In 2001 I began
+                    writing a book for SAMS on JSP web development (MySQL and
+                    JSP
+                    Web Development), and as part of it, I decided to write a
+                    chapter on Struts in the advanced section. In the process
+                    of
+                    learning enough about Struts to write about it, I realized
+                    that
+                    it could simplify some of the projects that I was working
+                    on for
+                    clients.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    After a half a year of working with Struts, I was asked by
+                    SAMS
+                    to write another book, this time concentrating on Struts
+                    specifically. That book, co-authored with a former
+                    co-worker n
+                    amed Kevin Bedell, became Struts Kick Start.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    In the process of writing that book, I began to realize
+                    that
+                    there were things I could do to contribute to Struts
+                    beyond
+                    writing about it. One thing in particular was to clean up
+                    and
+                    add some functionality to the Commons Validator project,
+                    which
+                    eventually led to me release-managing (with a lot of
+                    help!) the
+                    Commons Validator 1.0 release.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    More generally, I've been a software developer for over 22
+                    years, starting with work as a Research Specialist at the
+                    MIT AI
+                    Lab. I spent nearly a decade working in LISP, before
+                    moving on
+                    to C/Unix, a stint managing the Web Site for the Christian
+                    Science Monitor, and finally Java based e-Commerce
+                    development,
+                    which has kept me busy for the last five years.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    In addition to the two books mentioned above, I also write
+                    for a
+                    number of publications, including WIRED and the
+                    aforementioned
+                    Christian Science Monitor. You can get a look at my
+                    portfolio
+                    <a href="http://www.blackbear.com/monitor.html">here</a>
+                    . I'm
+                    also working on a third book with a bunch of other folks
+                    for
+                    O'Reilly, which will cover Apache Axis. I also edit the
+                    OpenSolaris.org site for Sun.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="ekbush">Eddie Bush -- Committer</h4>
+
+                <p>
+                    My first experiences with Java made me wince. The language
+                    was young-ish still and growing by leaps and bounds all
+                    the time.
+                    To me, it seemed unintelligent to invest any significant
+                    intellectual resources in learning it because I perceived
+                    it as
+                    such a &quot;moving target&quot;. Of course, that has
+                    changed.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I'd been looking for a way to really do heavy-duty
+                    processing of
+                    web requests that was higher-level than CGI. In
+                    particular, I
+                    was on a quest to find somethiong that did not involve
+                    using
+                    Microsoft (tm) technologies. A friend of mine started
+                    chatting up the idea of Java servlets and JSP pages. I
+                    didn't
+                    really like the idea of using Java because of my
+                    previously
+                    formed opinion, but, having a great deal of respect for my
+                    friend's opinion, I set out on an exursion to delve into
+                    the
+                    world of Java-driven dynamic web page generation.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    The language (and myself) had matured considerably by this
+                    time,
+                    and I found my previous inhibitions were no longer well
+                    founded.
+                    However, as much as I liked the technology, I was
+                    dissatisfied.
+                    There just had to be a better way! I loved the concept of
+                    having a controller servlet, but, lacking experience in
+                    building
+                    externally-configurable Java &quot;thingies&quot;, I was
+                    hard-coding a lot, and, after a point, that started to
+                    really
+                    rub me wrong. At this point, I started buying books and
+                    really
+                    &quot;studying&quot; the technology more seriously.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    I honestly don't recall where I stumbled onto Struts, but
+                    I do
+                    recall having toyed with a number of different frameworks
+                    - none
+                    of which I really recall now. I quickly fell in love with
+                    Struts -- partially because it was an Apache project, and
+                    partially because it was evident to me that the project
+                    had a
+                    really great user-base.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    As time rocked along, I found myself becoming more deeply
+                    involved in the project. I studied the source and learned
+                    a
+                    great deal about architecting configurable Java
+                    &quot;thingies&quot;, and learned a fantastic amount about
+                    actually using the framework.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    In time, I got comfortable enough with how Struts was
+                    structured
+                    that I began submitting patches - mostly documentation,
+                    which
+                    Ted Husted &quot;massaged&quot; and applied. I enjoyed the
+                    feeling of gratification I got from helping to make Struts
+                    better, even if minorly.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    My last patch submitted as a non-committer was for
+                    ActionServlet.
+                    This was back when Struts 1.1 was working toward GA
+                    release. It
+                    was the first patch I hadn't had applied within a few days
+                    of
+                    submission and I grew impatient. Modules did not work
+                    properly
+                    without it and they did with it! &quot;How can they not
+                    apply
+                    that patch when it's so critical to Struts?&quot; I
+                    thought to
+                    myself.
+                </p>
+
+                <p>
+                    Well, to keep this book from becoming a novel, I started a
+                    campaign to have the patch applied which resulted in
+                    my gaining committer status and applying the patch myself!
+                    I should note that Steve Ditlinger and myself collaborated
+                    on the
+                    patch. I submitted a version, he made some suggestions and
+                    submitted an altered patch, and then we, collectively,
+                    decided
+                    to make a couple of other modifications, which I applied
+                    just
+                    before committing the patch.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="niallp">Niall Pemberton -- PMC Member</h4>
+                <p>
+                    I've worked as a developer since 1988 using various
+                    technologies/platforms.
+                    In the late nineties I kept meaning to learn java but
+                    never found the time
+                    until 2000. I bought a couple of books (Java in 30 Days
+                    and a Certification
+                    Study Guide), passed the Sun certification exam and got my
+                    first java job.
+                </p>
+                <p>
+                    Early in 2001 I was investigating writing the first web
+                    app for the company
+                    I was working for and came across Struts - just before the
+                    1.0 beta was
+                    released. After a while I came off the user list because
+                    of the volume of
+                    traffic and just monitored the developers list. Late in
+                    2003 I migrated to
+                    Struts 1.1, re-joined the user list and started submitting
+                    a few patches.
+                    Was invited to become a Struts Committer in May 2004 and
+                    PMC member in
+                    September 2004.
+                </p>
+
+                <h4 id="hrabago">Hubert Rabago -- PMC Member</h4>
+                <p>
+                    I started working with Java early in 2000. We designed and
+                    implemented a
+                    servlet-based application that to this day gives me and a
+                    fellow designer
+                    the urge to do a total rewrite. On my next assignment,
+                    somebody
+                    introduced me to a series of patterns useful for web
+                    applications. We
+                    built a framework using these patterns and it worked out
+                    well for us.
+                </p>
+                <p>
+                    When I tried to bring this framework into the next
+                    project, somebody
+                    suggested using Struts instead. The two frameworks
+                    resembled each other
+                    so closely that we had no trouble at all switching. One of
+                    the things
+                    missing in Struts was an easy way to do redirects with

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