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From sblack...@apache.org
Subject [13/50] [abbrv] incubator-streams git commit: [maven-release-plugin] prepare release streams-project-0.2-incubating-rc2
Date Fri, 08 May 2015 21:20:49 GMT
http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator-streams/blob/434848fa/streams-contrib/streams-provider-rss/src/test/resources/test_rss_xml/economistCombined.xml
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-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
-<rss version="2.0" xmlns:media="http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/">
-    <channel>
-        <title>The Economist: Business</title>
-        <description>Business</description>
-        <link>http://www.economist.com</link>
-        <image>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com</link>
-            <width>125</width>
-            <title>Economist.com</title>
-            <url>//cdn.static-economist.com/sites/all/themes/econfinal/images/the-economist-logo.gif</url>
-            <height>34</height>
-        </image>
-        <language>en-gb</language>
-        <lastBuildDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</lastBuildDate>
-        <webMaster>webmaster@economist.com</webMaster>
-        <managingEditor>rondiorio@economist.com</managingEditor>
-        <ttl>120</ttl>
-        <docs>http://www.economist.com/rss/</docs>
-        <item>
-            <title>Companies and geopolitical risk: Profits in a time of war</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140920_WBP001_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;ISLAMIC STATE may be a geopolitical threat, but it has not yet posed much of a danger to business. A day’s drive from the fighting, in Kurdish-run Iraq, three Western oil firms, Genel Energy, DNO and Gulf Keystone, continue to pump out crude that is piped or sent by road to Turkey. Their combined market value plunged after IS seized the city of Mosul in June, but has recovered to $8.3 billion, down 29% from the start of the year—a hefty fall, but not so bad for firms on the front line of fanaticism.“We’ve gone from a place that was a bit tricky in terms of security to a full-on war,” says the chief of one firm. But he is confident that the Kurdish region’s well-armed militia will protect his business. So far investors have tweaked their financial models, not run for the door. Analysts now assume a cost of capital of 15%, up from 12.5% before IS struck, he says.That mix of instability and business-as-usual is true of the world at large. In a ne
 w book Henry Kissinger, the doyen of foreign-policy strategists, describes a world in which disorder threatens, and violence in Ukraine and the Middle East and tensions in the South China Sea vindicate him. In theory, after...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618815-death-chaos-destruction-theyre-not-bad-companies-you-might-think-profits-time?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618815-death-chaos-destruction-theyre-not-bad-companies-you-might-think-profits-time</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Schumpeter: Entrepreneurs anonymous</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140920_WBD000_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;SEVEN years ago Joe Jones (not his real name) left his job with a big NASDAQ-listed company to strike out on his own. He was sick of corporate life and he wanted to test his inner mettle. But being an entrepreneur proved far harder than he had imagined: a succession of potholes, speed bumps and dead-ends rather than a high road to prosperity. He found he had “lost his levers of control”: all the things his former employer had provided for him, from administrative support to a social network. He had to learn how to do all sorts of things he had not thought about before. The responsibility of meeting his payroll was “overwhelming”. The worry about every detail of his life—could he afford to keep his car, or pay the mortgage on his house?—was all-consuming. He took to drinking. Mr Jones eventually joined Alcoholics Anonymous and turned his business into a success. But many other would-be entrepreneurs have not been so lucky.It is fashionable to r
 omanticise entrepreneurs. Business professors celebrate the geniuses who break the rules and change the world. Politicians praise them as wealth creators. Glossy magazines drool over Richard Branson’s villa on Lake Como. But...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618816-instead-romanticising-entrepreneurs-people-should-understand-how-hard-their-lives-can?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618816-instead-romanticising-entrepreneurs-people-should-understand-how-hard-their-lives-can</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Huawei: The great disrupter’s new targets</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;“THE last time there were so many people down by here, the Rolling Stones were in town.” So declared one of those attending an unusual gathering this week in a vast auditorium along the shores of Shanghai’s Huangpu River. The music was blaring, the coloured lights flashing and the ceiling shimmering, but this was not another rock concert. Astonishingly, the enthusiastic throngs—10,000 squeezed into the venue and another 13,000 joined in via streaming video—had gathered for a technology conference.The gig was organised by Huawei, a Chinese maker of telecoms equipment, which used the occasion to unveil a new business strategy. As they strode across the stage in front of a video screen nearly as wide as a football pitch, Huawei’s bosses declared their aim of making their firm the world’s leading information-technology (IT) company. In the first stage of this, Huawei plans to increase its sales of servers, storage and other data-centre equ
 ipment by a factor of ten by 2020. Last year such products brought in only about $1 billion of Huawei’s total revenues of $39 billion.It is an audacious goal. It pits Huawei against such titans as IBM, Cisco and HP—innovative giants with deep customer relationships and comprehensive offerings that Huawei cannot yet match. Then again, a decade or so ago Huawei faced a similar challenge in telecoms equipment and has grown to become one of the...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618861-chinese-firm-prepares-take-hp-cisco-and-other-it-giants-great-disrupters-new?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618861-chinese-firm-prepares-take-hp-cisco-and-other-it-giants-great-disrupters-new</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Brewery mergers: Foamy war</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-float-290&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20140920_WBP005_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;290&quot; height=&quot;312&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;THE world’s biggest brewer, AB InBev (ABI), is also the most frugal. There are no company cars for senior executives. Carlos Brito, the boss, flies economy class. That is one reason why, with 18% of global beer sales, ABI has a third of the profits.This will matter in the wary manoeuvres now taking place among the giants of global brewing. On September 14th Heineken, the number three by volume (see chart), said it had rejected a takeover proposal from SABMiller, the number two. SAB seems to have been trying to defend itself against a possible takeover by ABI, which was said to be talking to bankers about raising £75 billion ($121 billion) to buy its rival. That was little more than a rumour, but industry-watchers suspect something big is indeed brewing, in brewing. And the chances are that ever-thirsty ABI, maker of Budweiser and Stella Artois, will swallow SAB.&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-float-290 retina-290&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/original-size/images/print-edition/20140920_WBC720.png&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;580&quot; height=&quot;670&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;The beer behemoth has few other ways to grow. In rich countries,...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618862-sabmiller-may-be-swallowed-up-its-main-rival-ab-inbev-foamy-war?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618862-sabmiller-may-be-swallowed-up-its-main-rival-ab-inbev-foamy-war</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Sony’s woes: Pouring cold water</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140920_WBP003_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-                &lt;span class=&quot;caption&quot;&gt;Hirai under pressure&lt;/span&gt;
-                &lt;/div&gt;THIS month the chief executive of Sony, Kazuo Hirai, gamely subjected himself to the “ice-bucket challenge”—to raise money to fight a little-known disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis—and was duly drenched in freezing water, following the examples of assorted technology titans and celebrities. Mr Hirai was presumably reminded of that chilling sensation this week, when he was obliged to announce that Sony would take a $1.7 billion impairment charge on the value of its mobile-phone unit, because of lowered expectations for sales of smartphones. For the first time since 1958, when Sony was first listed, the firm will not pay a dividend this year.With its Xperia range of phones, Sony had recently begun to enjoy some success in the category. For years, smartphones have been the undisputed king of consumer gadgets, Sony’s main business. Strong sales had in turn raised hopes that the firm could at last begin to revive its ailing consumer-electronics 
 division, which despite years of losses and mounting calls for the firm to exit parts of the business, still produces two-thirds of its sales.Its achievements in smartphones...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618863-dismal-results-show-need-more-vigorous-restructuring-pouring-cold-water?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618863-dismal-results-show-need-more-vigorous-restructuring-pouring-cold-water</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Aircraft cabins: Piketty Airways</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-float-290&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20140920_WBP004_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;290&quot; height=&quot;423&quot; /&gt;
-                &lt;span class=&quot;caption&quot;&gt;Back in the days when we had elbow-room&lt;/span&gt;
-                &lt;/div&gt;TWO economy-class passengers recently caused a ruckus on a flight between Miami and Paris, after one annexed the sliver of territory they shared by reclining his seat. It was one of three such incidents within a fortnight which led to planes being diverted.Nowadays those at the cheap end of the plane barely have room to open their copies of Thomas Piketty’s recent book lamenting a new age of inequality. Yet airlines think there is further scope for cramming more bodies into economy, and that passengers, for all their moans, will tolerate this in exchange for cheap fares. Meanwhile, business class keeps on getting comfier.Some economy-class seats have already lost about 30% of their weight in the past 10 to 20 years, says René Dankwerth of RECARO, a seat-maker. But there is scope to do more: padding is being made thinner by replacing foam with netting; reclining mechanisms are being removed from some short-haul planes. Most of the extra room thus create
 d is used to squeeze in extra rows of seats.Skift, a research firm, notes that this has prompted a seating war among the planemakers. First,...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618881-distance-between-back-and-front-plane-will-keep-widening-piketty-airways?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618881-distance-between-back-and-front-plane-will-keep-widening-piketty-airways</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Air France: Strikers against reality</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;THE good news is that Air France has an idea for getting back into the black: building up Transavia, the low-cost, short-haul carrier it shares with its partner, the Dutch flag-carrier, KLM. The bad news is that its pilots won’t allow it; they want Transavia’s pilots to be on the same pay and conditions as they enjoy. The fear is that an expanded Transavia will cut into Air France’s own short-haul services and that its pilots will be fired or forced to accept pay cuts. They have gone on strike in protest. The strike, in its fourth day as we went to press on September 18th, may be the worst at the airline since a particularly confrontational 1998. Around half of all flights were being grounded, with daily losses the company puts at €15m ($19m).Air France-KLM, Lufthansa and International Airlines Group (IAG, which owns British Airways and Iberia), are all in the same fix. Low-cost rivals such as EasyJet and Ryanair now dominate short-haul serv
 ices. Europe’s national flag-carriers are struggling to stay in short-haul, to ensure they have passengers to feed into their more profitable long-haul routes. They have tried slashing fares but are hitting the limits of this, because of entrenched working conditions and determined unions. All three are plumping for new solutions.Last year IAG took over Vueling, a budget airline based in Barcelona that serves mainly Spain and the...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618884-pilots-stop-work-french-flag-carrier-struggles-reinvent-itself-strikers-against?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618884-pilots-stop-work-french-flag-carrier-struggles-reinvent-itself-strikers-against</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Energy in Europe: The gasman cutteth</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;NAPOLEON and Hitler both succumbed to the bitter Russian winter in their efforts at territorial expansion in Europe. Now, Vladimir Putin seems to be exporting a bit of Russian chill as part of his strategy to shift Europe’s borders in his favour. In recent days there have been ill-explained reductions in the flow of gas that Gazprom, a Russian state firm, supplies to Poland, Austria and Slovakia—possibly to warn them off re-exporting any of it to Ukraine.Russia provides one-third of the gas that other European countries rely on to heat their homes, generate electricity and feed industry. So far the assumption among western European governments and industrial gas users is that even if relations with Russia worsen further, there is little danger of a complete and long-term cut in supplies, since Russia’s government is so dependent on the revenues from gas exports.However, a short-term interruption in the coming months, as winter descends, is not
  so unthinkable. Fortunately, most European countries would be able to struggle through. Their gas-storage facilities are about 90% full, since last winter was mild and they did a bit of further topping-up over the summer. Last year Europe imported 155 billion cubic metres (bcm) of Russian gas; stocks currently stand at 75bcm. So European energy distributors would have a few months’ grace to find alternative supplies.Norway, a big...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618885-europe-could-survive-cut-russian-gas-only-short-one-gasman-cutteth?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21618885-europe-could-survive-cut-russian-gas-only-short-one-gasman-cutteth</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 18 September 2014 15:01:07 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Netflix expands in Europe: An American in Paris</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-float-290&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20140913_WBP002_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;290&quot; height=&quot;372&quot; /&gt;
-                &lt;span class=&quot;caption&quot;&gt;A transatlantic tryst with a happy ending&lt;/span&gt;
-                &lt;/div&gt;AMERICAN internet giants such as Google and Amazon are the target of much criticism in Europe these days, accused of avoiding taxes, invading privacy and competing unfairly with local firms. The latest transatlantic tech firm to ruffle feathers is Netflix, a fast-growing company that offers streaming video on demand (SVOD) over the internet and which has already got conventional broadcasters and pay-TV companies worried back home in America.Netflix has been signing up viewers in Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic countries; and next week it starts invading the continental heartland, beginning with France. Television companies, telecoms firms and other on-demand video providers fear for their customer bases and profits.Canal+, a French pay-TV firm that launched its own SVOD service three years ago, called CanalPlay, is rustling up new programmes and adding other features to get viewers to stay. Sky Deutschland, a German pay-TV firm, has slash
 ed the monthly charge for its SVOD service, Snap, to €3.99 ($5.16)—it had previously cost up to €9.90. Maxdome, a video on demand (VOD)...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21617003-video-streaming-firm-enters-some-crowded-new-markets-american-paris?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21617003-video-streaming-firm-enters-some-crowded-new-markets-american-paris</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:23 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Car rentals: Hire purpose</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;BOOTLEGGERS and bank-robbers were among the first to use car-hire firms when they got going in the 1920s. Nowadays their customers are more likely to be tired and irritable travellers, picking up the keys at an airport hire desk, lacking the energy to quibble with all those optional extras being loaded on to the bill. It is a big business—worldwide turnover last year was about $37 billion. But a wave of consolidation in recent years has left just three firms—Hertz, Avis Budget and Enterprise—with 95% of the market in America and a sizeable share elsewhere. So it ought to be a cosy oligopoly, with the dominant firms feeling no need to compete vigorously.However, Hertz’s boss, Mark Frissora, does not see it that way. An investor backlash against his undercutting of rivals may be one of the reasons why he quit—officially for “personal reasons”—this week.Mr Frissora has been under pressure because of accounting errors discovered at the f
 irm, going back to 2011. But analysts at Morgan Stanley, an investment bank, say Hertz shareholders have also expressed annoyance at the way Mr Frissora was being “too disruptive” and failing to “behave” on price-setting. The analysts think he was right: the rising use of smartphone apps to book cars, the emergence of new business models for car-sharing and a renewed interest in the hire business by carmakers together mean that the industry is...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21617004-hertzs-departing-boss-may-have-foreseen-future-car-rentals-hire-purpose?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21617004-hertzs-departing-boss-may-have-foreseen-future-car-rentals-hire-purpose</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:23 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Apple’s future: Reluctant reformation</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140913_WBP003_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;APPLE prides itself on constantly re-imagining the future, but even the world’s leading gadget-maker likes to dwell on the past too. Thirty years ago Steve Jobs commanded the stage at the Flint Centre for the Performing Arts near Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino to show off the new Macintosh computer. On September 9th Mr Jobs’s successor, Tim Cook, held a similar performance in the same location to thunderous applause. Those invited were given a chance to play with the gadgets presented on stage: two new iPhones and a wearable device, called the Apple Watch. “This is the next chapter in Apple’s story,” he said, sounding much like the young Mr Jobs in 1984.It may well be true—but not for the reasons most people might think. Consumers, analysts and investors have been howling for proof that Apple can still do the magic tricks of the Jobs era; iPad sales have weakened in recent quarters and the iPhone, launched a tech aeon ago in 2007, still g
 enerates more than half of the firm’s revenues. Yet lost in the maelstrom of snazzy new gadgets, applause and photos was an important shift: this week’s announcements showed that Apple’s future will be less about hardware and...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616967-apple-becoming-very-different-company-and-not-just-because-its-newly-unveiled?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616967-apple-becoming-very-different-company-and-not-just-because-its-newly-unveiled</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:22 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Share buy-backs: The repurchase revolution</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
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-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140913_WBD001_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
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-                &lt;/div&gt;IN THE decade before America’s housing bubble burst, Home Depot, an American home-improvement chain, spent heavily on building new shops to meet rampant demand for everything from taps to timber. For every dollar of operating cashflow the firm generated, it ploughed back 65 cents into capital investment. The financial crisis hit hard, and demand for some products has yet to recover fully. Sales of kitchens are only 60% of their peak level. But Home Depot has evolved into a very different kind of beast. Its capital investment has fallen by two-thirds and it is investing heavily in something else: its own shares.Since 2008 it has spent 28 cents of every dollar of cashflow on dividends and a further 52 cents on share repurchases. In June it took advantage of low interest rates to issue a $2 billion bond partly to pay for more buy-backs—a “great trade, these kind of opportunities don’t come often”, says Carol Tomé, the firm’s chief financial offi
 cer. She says that as more customers buy online, there is less need to invest in physical shops, and that using excess cashflow and cheap debt to repurchase stock creates value for investors. The stockmarket seems to agree:...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616968-companies-have-been-gobbling-up-their-own-shares-exceptional-rate-there-are-good-reasons?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616968-companies-have-been-gobbling-up-their-own-shares-exceptional-rate-there-are-good-reasons</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:22 GMT</pubDate>
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-        <item>
-            <title>Schumpeter: The China wave</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
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-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140913_WBD000_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
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-                &lt;/div&gt;MANAGEMENT thinkers have paid surprisingly little attention to how Chinese firms are run. They routinely ascribe those firms’ rapid growth in recent years to their copious supply of cheap labour, or to generous financial backing from the state, rather than inventiveness. They have much more time for India, particularly its knack for frugal innovation, with all those colourful stories of banks putting cash machines on bikes and taking them into the countryside, and companies building water purifiers out of coconut husks.However, it seems unlikely that China’s companies have come as far as they have just by applying lots of labour and capital. It is also hard to imagine that the huge expansion of China’s education system and its technology industries is not producing fresh management thinking. Western companies knew little about Japan’s system of lean production until its carmakers gobbled up their markets. The danger is that the same will happen wi
 th Chinese management ideas.There are, however, signs that these are now getting the attention they deserve. The &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;MIT Sloan Management Review&lt;/em&gt; devotes much of its current issue to examining...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616974-chinese-management-ideas-are-beginning-get-attention-they-deserve-china-wave?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616974-chinese-management-ideas-are-beginning-get-attention-they-deserve-china-wave</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:22 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Swiss watches and the Apple Watch: It’s not about time</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;WHEN cheap, accurate quartz watches started pouring out of Asia in the 1970s, many Swiss watchmakers went bust. But the survivors recovered their sangfroid and went on to prosper as crafters of stylish timepieces that proclaim the wearer’s taste and status better than any electronic gizmo could.Do Apple’s new smartwatch and devices like it portend another quartz catastrophe? Some think they might. Wrists are “prime real estate”, points out Richard Seymour, a design consultant. Many people park expensive watches there—especially men, since that is the main sort of jewellery that convention allows them. So if smartwatches catch on, they could evict the Swiss baubles.That seems to be Apple’s ambition. It has been poaching talent from fashion houses (Angela Ahrendts from Burberry and Paul Deneve from Yves Saint Laurent). Its new watches aim to be more than gadgets: some have 18-carat gold cases. Sir Jonathan Ive, Apple’s design chief, has 
 reportedly boasted to colleagues that the Swiss are in trouble.They are not trembling yet. Smartwatches are a mere “information tool” that say “nothing special” about the wearer, says Jean-Claude Biver, chairman of Hublot, a Swiss brand owned by LVMH, a big luxury group. They become obsolete as soon as the technology advances. Swiss watchmakers, on the other hand, are selling “eternity in a box.”Cheaper and less eternal Swiss-watch brands,...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616975-traditional-watchmakers-are-confident-they-can-see-apples-new-bauble-its-not-about-time?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21616975-traditional-watchmakers-are-confident-they-can-see-apples-new-bauble-its-not-about-time</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 11 September 2014 14:54:22 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Schumpeter: Over the horizon</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140906_WBD000_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;FOR most people a 50th anniversary is an excuse for a party. For the men and women of McKinsey it is an excuse for a conference. Earlier this year the consulting firm decided to celebrate half a century of the &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;McKinsey Quarterly&lt;/em&gt; by arranging a gathering of some of the world’s leading business thinkers and asking them to look forward to the next 50 years of management. The resulting special issue of the &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Quarterly&lt;/em&gt; is inevitably a mixed bag. A discussion on strategy inadvertently demonstrates the parlous state of the discipline that has provided McKinsey with its bread and butter. A puff-piece on eBay’s policy of recruiting female executives demonstrates that you should never let companies write about themselves (“Gender diversity has long been a passion of our CEO…”). But there are three issues that stand out.The first is that the rise of smart machines wil
 l have a dramatic impact on the role of executives. Andrew McAfee of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology points out that the first machine age gave rise to the modern discipline of management: companies hired armies of managers to co-ordinate the workers who...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615586-three-issues-should-preoccupy-managers-next-50-years-over-horizon?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615586-three-issues-should-preoccupy-managers-next-50-years-over-horizon</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Germany’s Googlephobia: Closing the circle</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140906_WBD001_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;IN ITS nearly 500-year history, Unter den Linden, Berlin’s main boulevard, has seen many political protests. But the one held recently in front of Google’s offices in the German capital must be among the most peculiar. Activists demonstrated against iWright, a new software that can supposedly write novels and is supposedly backed by Google. “It’s a declaration of war against all authors”, an organiser said.If all this sounds like a PR stunt, it probably was—though it is not clear what for. Still, it nicely captures the mood in Germany. Although Germans seem to love Google’s services (it has a 91% market share in online search), the firm itself is seen as a digital glutton that intends to ingest everything: personal data, intellectual property, industry, even democracy. Sigmar Gabriel, Germany’s economy minister and vice-chancellor, has gone so far as to suggest that the company be broken up.In recent weeks things have calmed somewhat: next
  month Mr Gabriel is due to appear on a discussion panel with Eric Schmidt, Google’s executive chairman (who is also on the board of &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;The Economist’s&lt;/em&gt; parent company). But Germany’s Googlephobia is a big...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615588-why-online-giant-has-become-countrys-bogeyman-and-why-matters-closing-circle?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615588-why-online-giant-has-become-countrys-bogeyman-and-why-matters-closing-circle</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Executive pay: The final reckoning</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-float-290&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20140906_WBP002_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;290&quot; height=&quot;342&quot; /&gt;
-                &lt;span class=&quot;caption&quot;&gt;Worth every penny&lt;/span&gt;
-                &lt;/div&gt;IN HIS book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century”, Thomas Piketty argues that it is impossible to find an “objective basis” for the high salaries of senior executives in terms of their individual productivity: they pay themselves such exorbitant sums simply because they can. However, in a forthcoming paper in &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Management Science&lt;/em&gt;, an American journal, two academics claim to have found such an objective measure, and conclude that most bosses are not overpaid.In their study, Bang Dang Nguyen of the University of Cambridge’s Judge Business School and Kasper Meisner Nielsen of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology looked at how firms’ shares react when the chief executive or another prominent manager dies suddenly. They identified 149 cases of this happening at American companies between 1991 and 2008.They deem a boss to be overpaid if he gets more than his peers at firms of a similar type 
 and size, but fails to boost his company’s stockmarket value by at least the amount of his pay premium. They then assume that when an overpaid boss dies, investors will expect his successor’s pay...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615591-when-bosses-die-office-their-true-value-revealed-final-reckoning?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615591-when-bosses-die-office-their-true-value-revealed-final-reckoning</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Italian businesses: Keeping it in the family</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/print-edition/20140906_WBP003_0.jpg&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;595&quot; height=&quot;335&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;RAISED in an orphanage, Leonardo Del Vecchio started selling spectacles in Belluno in northern Italy in 1967. Today his company, Luxottica, owns Ray-Ban and Oakley, the two biggest brands of sunglasses, and has annual sales of €7.3 billion ($9.6 billion). Aged 79, Mr Del Vecchio (pictured, right) is Italy’s second-richest man. He stepped back from management a decade ago. But on September 1st he abruptly stepped back in. Andrea Guerra, Luxottica’s boss, has left. Mr Del Vecchio will head the triumvirate that will replace him.This is an unusual solution to a problem that faces many Italian firms: ageing patriarchs who are reluctant to bow out or even to plan for the day when they eventually must. Until Mr Del Vecchio’s comeback, there had seemed to be somewhat of a trend for founders and their heirs to hand management to professionals. In 2006 Salvatore Ferragamo, an upmarket shoemaker, hired Michele Norsa to succeed Feruccio Ferragamo, the founder
 ’s son. Sergio Marchionne, the boss of Fiat Chrysler, does not belong to the carmaker’s founding family, the Agnellis. Mr Del Vecchio had won praise for picking Mr Guerra over his relatives to run Luxottica.Smooth...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615594-patriarchs-are-reluctant-cede-control-companies-they-built-keeping-it-family?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615594-patriarchs-are-reluctant-cede-control-companies-they-built-keeping-it-family</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Digital news: Read all about it</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;LAST December Uruguay became the first country to legalise cannabis fully. Soon afterwards &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Vice.com,&lt;/em&gt; an American website, became the first news organisation to send a journalist to smoke weed with José Mujica, Uruguay’s president. It is this sort of plucky, playful reportage that has caught the attention of millions of young media consumers—and, more recently, investors. This week A&amp;E Networks, a television company jointly owned by Disney and Hearst, was negotiating to buy a 10% stake in &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Vice&lt;/em&gt;’s parent company.The deal would value Vice Media at $2.5 billion, nearly double what it was worth about a year ago when Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox bought a 5% stake, and ten times what Amazon’s founder, Jeff Bezos, paid for the venerable &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Washington Post&lt;/em&gt; last year. &lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Vice&
 lt;/em&gt; has come a long way from its origins as a punk magazine in Montreal.&lt;em class=&quot;Italic&quot;&gt;Vice&lt;/em&gt; is one of dozens of digital denizens launched in recent years, offering a populist mix of news and entertainment to readers via websites and mobile apps. It is valued more highly than many of its peers because it has a wider range of businesses: besides a news website and a magazine it has an advertising agency and a deal to make television shows for HBO.There are plenty of opportunities to claim young audiences who are...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615595-investors-are-taking-interest-journalism-now-news-read-all-about-it?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
-            <guid isPermaLink = "false">http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615595-investors-are-taking-interest-journalism-now-news-read-all-about-it</guid>
-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
-        </item>
-        <item>
-            <title>Alibaba: After the float</title>
-            <description>&lt;p&gt;&lt;div class=&quot;content-image-full retina-595&quot;&gt;
-
-                &lt;img src=&quot;http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/original-size/images/print-edition/20140906_WBC628.png&quot; alt=&quot;&quot; title=&quot;&quot;  width=&quot;1190&quot; height=&quot;806&quot; /&gt;
-
-                &lt;/div&gt;THE initial public offering of shares in Alibaba, due shortly on the New York Stock Exchange, may raise more than $20 billion, making it one of the biggest IPOs on record, and value the Chinese e-commerce firm at $150 billion or more. But is it worth it?There are certainly reasons to believe so. The firm dominates online shopping in China, which has passed America to become the world’s biggest e-commerce market. In terms of gross sales, Alibaba is bigger than eBay and Amazon combined. And unlike Amazon, Alibaba makes significant profits. Bolstering the case for optimism is the firm’s recent performance. Revenues shot up 46% in the second quarter, year-on-year, to top $2.5 billion; and profits almost trebled to $2 billion.There were worries, as there had been about Facebook, that Alibaba might stumble in the transition from desktop computers to mobile devices. This would be disastrous, since m-commerce is taking off spectacularly in China (see chart). 
 However, just as Facebook’s switch to smartphones and tablets has gone better than feared, Alibaba has quickly mastered the mobile internet too. According to iResearch, a consulting firm, over four-fifths...&lt;/p&gt;</description>
-            <link>http://www.economist.com/news/business/21615597-chinese-e-commerce-firm-faces-growing-competition-after-float?fsrc=rss|bus</link>
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-            <pubDate>Thu, 04 September 2014 15:08:05 GMT</pubDate>
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\ No newline at end of file

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator-streams/blob/434848fa/streams-contrib/streams-provider-rss/src/test/resources/top100.opml
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@@ -1,110 +0,0 @@
-<opml version="2.0">
-<head>
-	<title>Top 100 Feeds</title>
-	<ownerName>Share Your OPML</ownerName>
-	<ownerId>http://share.opml.org/contact/</ownerId>
-	<dateModified>Sun, 30 Sep 2007 15:33:49 GMT</dateModified>
-</head>
-<body>
-	<outline text="TechCrunch" title="TechCrunch" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Techcrunch" htmlUrl="http://www.techcrunch.com"/>
-	<outline text="Slashdot" title="Slashdot" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://rss.slashdot.org/Slashdot/slashdot" htmlUrl="http://slashdot.org/"/>
-	<outline text="Engadget" title="Engadget" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.engadget.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.engadget.com"/>
-	<outline text="Google Blog" title="Google Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://googleblog.blogspot.com/atom.xml" htmlUrl="http://googleblog.blogspot.com"/>
-	<outline text="Scobleizer - Microsoft Geek Blogger" title="Scobleizer - Microsoft Geek Blogger" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://scobleizer.wordpress.com/feed/" htmlUrl="http://scobleizer.wordpress.com"/>
-	<outline text="Joel on Software" title="Joel on Software" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.joelonsoftware.com"/>
-	<outline text="digg" title="digg" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://digg.com/rss/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://digg.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Boing Boing" title="Boing Boing" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/boingboing/iBag" htmlUrl="http://www.boingboing.net/"/>
-	<outline text="Scripting News" title="Scripting News" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.scripting.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.scripting.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Lifehacker" title="Lifehacker" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.lifehacker.com/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.lifehacker.com/"/>
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-	<outline text="43 Folders" title="43 Folders" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/43Folders" htmlUrl="http://www.43folders.com"/>
-	<outline text="A List Apart" title="A List Apart" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.alistapart.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.alistapart.com/"/>
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-	<outline text="ComputerZen.com - Scott Hanselman" title="ComputerZen.com - Scott Hanselman" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/ScottHanselman" htmlUrl="http://www.hanselman.com/blog/"/>
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-	<outline text="Google Weblog" title="Google Weblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://google.blogspace.com/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://google.blogspace.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Microsoft Watch from Mary Jo Foley" title="Microsoft Watch from Mary Jo Foley" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://rssnewsapps.ziffdavis.com/msw.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.microsoft-watch.com"/>
-	<outline text="Gizmodo" title="Gizmodo" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.gizmodo.net/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.gizmodo.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Mini-Microsoft" title="Mini-Microsoft" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://minimsft.blogspot.com/atom.xml" htmlUrl="http://minimsft.blogspot.com"/>
-	<outline text="Jeffrey Zeldman Presents: The Daily Report" title="Jeffrey Zeldman Presents: The Daily Report" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.zeldman.com/feed/zeldman.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.zeldman.com/"/>
-	<outline text="CrunchNotes" title="CrunchNotes" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Crunchnotes" htmlUrl="http://www.crunchnotes.com"/>
-	<outline text="mezzoblue" title="mezzoblue" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.mezzoblue.com/rss/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://mezzoblue.com/"/>
-	<outline text="SimpleBits" title="SimpleBits" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.simplebits.com/xml/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.simplebits.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Solution Watch" title="Solution Watch" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/SolutionWatch" htmlUrl="http://www.solutionwatch.com"/>
-	<outline text="MAKE Magazine" title="MAKE Magazine" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.makezine.com/blog/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.makezine.com/blog/"/>
-	<outline text="kuro5hin.org" title="kuro5hin.org" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.kuro5hin.org/backend.rdf" htmlUrl="http://www.kuro5hin.org/"/>
-	<outline text="Programmable Web" title="Programmable Web" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/ProgrammableWeb" htmlUrl="http://blog.programmableweb.com"/>
-	<outline text="ScottGu's Blog" title="ScottGu's Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/rss.aspx" htmlUrl="http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/"/>
-	<outline text="hack a day" title="hack a day" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.hackaday.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.hackaday.com/"/>
-	<outline text="The Daily WTF" title="The Daily WTF" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://TheDailyWTF.com/rss.aspx" htmlUrl="http://thedailywtf.com/forums/12/ShowForum.aspx"/>
-	<outline text="Dilbert" title="Dilbert" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/tapestrydilbert" htmlUrl="http://www.dilbert.com/"/>
-	<outline text="gapingvoid" title="gapingvoid" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.gapingvoid.com/index.rdf" htmlUrl="http://www.gapingvoid.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Coding Horror" title="Coding Horror" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/"/>
-	<outline text="The Doc Searls Weblog" title="The Doc Searls Weblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://partners.userland.com/people/docSearls.xml" htmlUrl="http://doc.weblogs.com/"/>
-	<outline text="timbl's blog" title="timbl's blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://dig.csail.mit.edu/breadcrumbs/blog/feed/4" htmlUrl="http://dig.csail.mit.edu/breadcrumbs/blog/4"/>
-	<outline text="Ars Technica" title="Ars Technica" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://arstechnica.com/index.ars/rss" htmlUrl="http://arstechnica.com"/>
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-	<outline text="Extremetech" title="Extremetech" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://rssnewsapps.ziffdavis.com/extreme.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.extremetech.com"/>
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-	<outline text="kottke.org" title="kottke.org" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.kottke.org/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.kottke.org/"/>
-	<outline text="Vitamin" title="Vitamin" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/vitaminmasterfeed" htmlUrl="http://www.thinkvitamin.com"/>
-	<outline text="CNET News.com" title="CNET News.com" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://news.com.com/2547-1_3-0-20.xml" htmlUrl="http://news.com.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Think Secret" title="Think Secret" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.thinksecret.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.thinksecret.com/"/>
-	<outline text="BetaNews.Com" title="BetaNews.Com" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.betanews.com/rss2" htmlUrl="http://www.betanews.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Yahoo! Search blog" title="Yahoo! Search blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.ysearchblog.com/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.ysearchblog.com/"/>
-	<outline text="kottke.org" title="kottke.org" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.kottke.org/main" htmlUrl="http://www.kottke.org/"/>
-	<outline text="Matt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO" title="Matt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/feed/" htmlUrl="http://www.mattcutts.com/blog"/>
-	<outline text="MSDN Just Published" title="MSDN Just Published" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://msdn.microsoft.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://msdn.microsoft.com/"/>
-	<outline text="VentureBlog" title="VentureBlog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/ventureblog" htmlUrl="http://p6.hostingprod.com/@www.ventureblog.com/"/>
-	<outline text="eHub" title="eHub" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/eHub" htmlUrl="http://www.emilychang.com/go/ehub/"/>
-	<outline text="The Official Google Reader Blog" title="The Official Google Reader Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://googlereader.blogspot.com/atom.xml" htmlUrl="http://googlereader.blogspot.com"/>
-	<outline text="MobileCrunch" title="MobileCrunch" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Mobilecrunch" htmlUrl="http://mobilecrunch.com"/>
-	<outline text="Seth's Blog" title="Seth's Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/atom.xml" htmlUrl="http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/"/>
-	<outline text="Cool Tools" title="Cool Tools" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.kk.org/cooltools/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.kk.org/cooltools/"/>
-	<outline text="Lifehacker" title="Lifehacker" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.gawker.com/lifehacker/full" htmlUrl="http://www.lifehacker.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Flickr" title="Flickr" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/Flickrblog" htmlUrl="http://blog.flickr.com/flickrblog/"/>
-	<outline text="PVRblog" title="PVRblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.pvrblog.com/pvr/index.rdf" htmlUrl="http://www.pvrblog.com/pvr/"/>
-	<outline text="Don Box's Spoutlet" title="Don Box's Spoutlet" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://pluralsight.com/blogs/dbox/Rss.aspx" htmlUrl="http://pluralsight.com/blogs/dbox/"/>
-	<outline text="Joi Ito's Web" title="Joi Ito's Web" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://joi.ito.com/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://joi.ito.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Burn This! - The FeedBurner Weblog" title="Burn This! - The FeedBurner Weblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/BurnThisRSS2" htmlUrl="http://blogs.feedburner.com/feedburner/"/>
-	<outline text="Eric.Weblog()" title="Eric.Weblog()" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://software.ericsink.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://software.ericsink.com/"/>
-	<outline text="O'Reilly Radar" title="O'Reilly Radar" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://radar.oreilly.com/index.rdf" htmlUrl="http://radar.oreilly.com/"/>
-	<outline text="IEBlog" title="IEBlog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/Rss.aspx" htmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/default.aspx"/>
-	<outline text="“Let the Good Times Roll” by Guy Kawasaki" title="“Let the Good Times Roll” by Guy Kawasaki" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.feedburner.com/letTheGoodTimesRollByGuyKawasaki" htmlUrl="http://blog.guykawasaki.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Larkware News" title="Larkware News" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.larkware.com/larkware2.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.larkware.com/"/>
-	<outline text="456 Berea Street" title="456 Berea Street" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.456bereastreet.com/feed.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.456bereastreet.com/"/>
-	<outline text="I, Cringely @ PBS.org" title="I, Cringely @ PBS.org" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/rss2.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.pbs.org/cringely/"/>
-	<outline text="ranchero.com" title="ranchero.com" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://ranchero.com/xml/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://ranchero.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Niall Kennedy's Weblog" title="Niall Kennedy's Weblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.niallkennedy.com/blog/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.niallkennedy.com/blog/"/>
-	<outline text="The Social Software Weblog" title="The Social Software Weblog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://socialsoftware.weblogsinc.com/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://socialsoftware.weblogsinc.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Seth's Blog" title="Seth's Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/index.rdf" htmlUrl="http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/"/>
-	<outline text="Wired News: Top Stories" title="Wired News: Top Stories" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.wired.com/news/feeds/rss2/0,2610,,00.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.wired.com/"/>
-	<outline text="NYT &gt; Circuits" title="NYT &gt; Circuits" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.nytimes.com/services/xml/rss/nyt/Technology.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.nytimes.com/pages/technology/index.html?partner%3Drssnyt"/>
-	<outline text="A List Apart-1" title="A List Apart-1" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.alistapart.com/feed/rss.xml" htmlUrl="http://www.alistapart.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Chris Pirillo" title="Chris Pirillo" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://chris.pirillo.com/index.xml" htmlUrl="http://chris.pirillo.com/blog"/>
-	<outline text="dpreview.com" title="dpreview.com" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.dpreview.com/news/dpr.rdf" htmlUrl="http://www.dpreview.com/"/>
-	<outline text="Lessig Blog" title="Lessig Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://www.lessig.org/blog/index.rdf" htmlUrl="http://www.lessig.org/blog/"/>
-	<outline text="Yahoo! User Interface Blog" title="Yahoo! User Interface Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://feeds.yuiblog.com/YahooUserInterfaceBlog" htmlUrl="http://yuiblog.com/blog"/>
-	<outline text="CNN.com" title="CNN.com" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://rss.cnn.com/rss/cnn_topstories.rss" htmlUrl="http://www.cnn.com/rssclick/?section%3Dcnn_topstories"/>
-</body>
-</opml>
\ No newline at end of file

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator-streams/blob/434848fa/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/pom.xml
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/pom.xml b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/pom.xml
index d35df8e..c99f006 100644
--- a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/pom.xml
+++ b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/pom.xml
@@ -91,20 +91,6 @@
         </testResources>
         <plugins>
             <plugin>
-                <artifactId>maven-clean-plugin</artifactId>
-                <version>2.5</version>
-                <configuration>
-                    <filesets>
-                        <fileset>
-                            <directory>target</directory>
-                            <includes>
-                                <include>**/*</include>
-                            </includes>
-                        </fileset>
-                    </filesets>
-                </configuration>
-            </plugin>
-            <plugin>
                 <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
                 <artifactId>build-helper-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                 <executions>

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator-streams/blob/434848fa/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosJsonSerDeTest.java
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosJsonSerDeTest.java b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosJsonSerDeTest.java
index 0122158..de3cc6b 100644
--- a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosJsonSerDeTest.java
+++ b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosJsonSerDeTest.java
@@ -22,6 +22,7 @@ import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.DeserializationFeature;
 import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
 import com.sysomos.json.Sysomos;
 import org.junit.Assert;
+import org.junit.Ignore;
 import org.junit.Test;
 import org.slf4j.Logger;
 import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
@@ -31,12 +32,9 @@ import java.io.InputStream;
 import java.io.InputStreamReader;
 
 /**
- * Created with IntelliJ IDEA.
- * User: sblackmon
- * Date: 8/20/13
- * Time: 5:57 PM
- * To change this template use File | Settings | File Templates.
+ * Tests ability to convert String json form to {@link com.sysomos.json.Sysomos} form
  */
+@Ignore("ignore until test resources are available.")
 public class SysomosJsonSerDeTest {
 
     private final static Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SysomosJsonSerDeTest.class);

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator-streams/blob/434848fa/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosXmlSerDeTest.java
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosXmlSerDeTest.java b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosXmlSerDeTest.java
index 59e6d51..4d3b6b6 100644
--- a/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosXmlSerDeTest.java
+++ b/streams-contrib/streams-provider-sysomos/src/test/java/com/sysomos/test/SysomosXmlSerDeTest.java
@@ -27,6 +27,7 @@ import com.fasterxml.jackson.dataformat.xml.XmlMapper;
 import com.sysomos.xml.BeatApi;
 import org.junit.Assert;
 import org.junit.Before;
+import org.junit.Ignore;
 import org.junit.Test;
 import org.slf4j.Logger;
 import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
@@ -36,12 +37,9 @@ import java.io.InputStream;
 import java.io.InputStreamReader;
 
 /**
- * Created with IntelliJ IDEA.
- * User: sblackmon
- * Date: 8/20/13
- * Time: 5:57 PM
- * To change this template use File | Settings | File Templates.
+ * Tests ability to convert String xml form to {@link com.sysomos.xml.BeatApi} form
  */
+@Ignore("ignore until test resources are available.")
 public class SysomosXmlSerDeTest {
 
     private final static Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SysomosXmlSerDeTest.class);


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