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From Nicholas Chammas <nicholas.cham...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: [discuss] dropping Python 2.6 support
Date Tue, 05 Jan 2016 22:19:34 GMT
As I pointed out in my earlier email, RHEL will support Python 2.6 until
2020. So I'm assuming these large companies will have the option of riding
out Python 2.6 until then.

Are we seriously saying that Spark should likewise support Python 2.6 for
the next several years? Even though the core Python devs stopped supporting
it in 2013?

If that's not what we're suggesting, then when, roughly, can we drop
support? What are the criteria?

I understand the practical concern here. If companies are stuck using 2.6,
it doesn't matter to them that it is deprecated. But balancing that concern
against the maintenance burden on this project, I would say that "upgrade
to Python 2.7 or stay on Spark 1.6.x" is a reasonable position to take.
There are many tiny annoyances one has to put up with to support 2.6.

I suppose if our main PySpark contributors are fine putting up with those
annoyances, then maybe we don't need to drop support just yet...

Nick
2016년 1월 5일 (화) 오후 2:27, Julio Antonio Soto de Vicente <julio@esbet.es>님이
작성:

> Unfortunately, Koert is right.
>
> I've been in a couple of projects using Spark (banking industry) where
> CentOS + Python 2.6 is the toolbox available.
>
> That said, I believe it should not be a concern for Spark. Python 2.6 is
> old and busted, which is totally opposite to the Spark philosophy IMO.
>
>
> El 5 ene 2016, a las 20:07, Koert Kuipers <koert@tresata.com> escribió:
>
> rhel/centos 6 ships with python 2.6, doesnt it?
>
> if so, i still know plenty of large companies where python 2.6 is the only
> option. asking them for python 2.7 is not going to work
>
> so i think its a bad idea
>
> On Tue, Jan 5, 2016 at 1:52 PM, Juliet Hougland <juliet.hougland@gmail.com
> > wrote:
>
>> I don't see a reason Spark 2.0 would need to support Python 2.6. At this
>> point, Python 3 should be the default that is encouraged.
>> Most organizations acknowledge the 2.7 is common, but lagging behind the
>> version they should theoretically use. Dropping python 2.6
>> support sounds very reasonable to me.
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 5, 2016 at 5:45 AM, Nicholas Chammas <
>> nicholas.chammas@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> +1
>>>
>>> Red Hat supports Python 2.6 on REHL 5 until 2020
>>> <https://alexgaynor.net/2015/mar/30/red-hat-open-source-community/>,
>>> but otherwise yes, Python 2.6 is ancient history and the core Python
>>> developers stopped supporting it in 2013. REHL 5 is not a good enough
>>> reason to continue support for Python 2.6 IMO.
>>>
>>> We should aim to support Python 2.7 and Python 3.3+ (which I believe we
>>> currently do).
>>>
>>> Nick
>>>
>>> On Tue, Jan 5, 2016 at 8:01 AM Allen Zhang <allenzhang010@126.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> plus 1,
>>>>
>>>> we are currently using python 2.7.2 in production environment.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 在 2016-01-05 18:11:45,"Meethu Mathew" <meethu.mathew@flytxt.com>
写道:
>>>>
>>>> +1
>>>> We use Python 2.7
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>> Meethu Mathew
>>>>
>>>> On Tue, Jan 5, 2016 at 12:47 PM, Reynold Xin <rxin@databricks.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Does anybody here care about us dropping support for Python 2.6 in
>>>>> Spark 2.0?
>>>>>
>>>>> Python 2.6 is ancient, and is pretty slow in many aspects (e.g. json
>>>>> parsing) when compared with Python 2.7. Some libraries that Spark depend
on
>>>>> stopped supporting 2.6. We can still convince the library maintainers
to
>>>>> support 2.6, but it will be extra work. I'm curious if anybody still
uses
>>>>> Python 2.6 to run Spark.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>
>

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