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From acon...@apache.org
Subject qpid-proton git commit: PROTON-865: Fix wonky line numbers in tutorial.
Date Thu, 16 Jul 2015 16:15:03 GMT
Repository: qpid-proton
Updated Branches:
  refs/heads/cjansen-cpp-client 58c57e790 -> c4e2e596d


PROTON-865: Fix wonky line numbers in tutorial.

Looks like there is doxygen bug with incorrect line numbers if \dontinclude is
used in a markdown file. Changed the tutorial.md to tutorial.hpp with markdown
wrapped in a comment, this works.


Project: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/repo
Commit: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/commit/c4e2e596
Tree: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/tree/c4e2e596
Diff: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/diff/c4e2e596

Branch: refs/heads/cjansen-cpp-client
Commit: c4e2e596d5ce2fee29c7b261fb6f75ddeb1b12a5
Parents: 58c57e7
Author: Alan Conway <aconway@redhat.com>
Authored: Thu Jul 16 12:09:20 2015 -0400
Committer: Alan Conway <aconway@redhat.com>
Committed: Thu Jul 16 12:11:52 2015 -0400

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.hpp | 369 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.md  | 362 --------------------------
 2 files changed, 369 insertions(+), 362 deletions(-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------


http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/blob/c4e2e596/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.hpp
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.hpp b/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.hpp
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..337ed21
--- /dev/null
+++ b/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.hpp
@@ -0,0 +1,369 @@
+// -*-markdown-*-
+// NOTE: doxygen can include markdown pages directly but there seems to be a bug
+// that shows messed-up line numbers in \skip \until code extracts so this file
+// is markdown wrapped in a C++ comment - which works.
+
+/** \page tutorial Tutorial
+Tutorial 
+========
+
+This is a brief tutorial that will walk you through the fundamentals of building
+messaging applications in incremental steps. There are further examples, in
+addition the ones mentioned in the tutorial.
+
+Some of the examples require an AMQP *broker* that can receive, store and send
+messages. \ref broker.cpp is a simple example broker which you can use. When run
+without arguments it listens on `0.0.0.0:5672`, the standard AMQP port on all
+network interfaces. To use a different port or network interface:
+
+    broker -a <host>:<port>
+
+Instead of the example broker, you can use any AMQP 1.0 compliant broker. You
+must configure your broker to have a queue (or topic) named "examples".
+
+Most of the examples take an optional URL argument or `-a URL` option the
+URL looks like:
+
+    HOST:PORT/ADDRESS
+
+It usually defaults to `127.0.0.1:5672/examples`, but you can change this if
+your broker is on a different host or port, or you want to use a different queue
+or topic name (the ADDRESS part of the URL). URL details are at `proton::url`
+
+Hello World!
+------------
+
+\dontinclude helloworld.cpp
+
+Tradition dictates that we start with hello world! This example sends a message
+to a broker and the receives the same message back to demonstrate sending and
+receiving. In a realistic system the sender and receiver would normally be in
+different processes. The complete example is \ref helloworld.cpp
+
+We will include the following classes: `proton::container` runs an event loop
+which dispatches events to a `proton::messaging_handler`. This allows a
+*reactive* style of programming which is well suited to messaging
+applications. `proton::url` is a simple parser for the URL format described
+above.
+
+\skip   proton/container
+\until  proton/url
+
+We will define a class `hello_world` which is a subclass of
+`proton::messaging_handler` and over-rides functions to handle the events
+of interest in sending and receiving a message.
+
+\skip class hello_world
+\until {}
+
+`on_start()` is called when the event loop first starts. We handle that by
+establishing a connection and creating a sender and a receiver.
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+`on_sendable()` is called when message can be transferred over the associated
+sender link to the remote peer. We create a `proton::message`, set the message
+body to `"Hello World!"` and send the message. Then we close the sender as we only
+want to send one message. Closing the sender will prevent further calls to
+`on_sendable()`.
+
+\skip on_sendable
+\until }
+
+`on_message()` is called when a message is received. We just print the body of
+the message and close the connection, as we only want one message
+
+\skip on_message
+\until }
+
+The message body is a `proton::value`, see the documentation for more on how to
+extract the message body as type-safe C++ values.
+
+Our `main` function creates an instance of the `hello_world` handler and a
+proton::container using that handler. Calling `proton::container::run` sets
+things in motion and returns when we close the connection as there is nothing
+further to do. It may throw an exception, which will be a subclass of
+`proton::error`. That in turn is a subclass of `std::exception`.
+
+\skip main
+\until }
+\until }
+\until }
+
+Hello World, Direct!
+--------------------
+
+\dontinclude helloworld_direct.cpp
+
+Though often used in conjunction with a broker, AMQP does not *require* this. It
+also allows senders and receivers can communicate directly if desired.
+
+We will modify our example to send a message directly to itself. This is a bit
+contrived but illustrates both sides of the direct send/receive scenario. Full
+code at \ref helloworld_direct.cpp
+
+The first difference, is that rather than creating a receiver on the same
+connection as our sender, we listen for incoming connections by invoking the
+`proton::container::listen()` method on the container.
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+As we only need then to initiate one link, the sender, we can do that by
+passing in a url rather than an existing connection, and the connection
+will also be automatically established for us.
+
+We send the message in response to the `on_sendable()` callback and
+print the message out in response to the `on_message()` callback exactly
+as before.
+
+\skip on_sendable
+\until }
+\until }
+
+However we also handle two new events. We now close the connection from
+the senders side once the message has been accepted.
+The acceptance of the message is an indication of successful transfer to the
+peer. We are notified of that event through the `on_accepted()`
+callback.
+
+\skip on_accepted
+\until }
+
+Then, once the connection has been closed, of which we are
+notified through the `on_closed()` callback, we stop accepting incoming
+connections at which point there is no work to be done and the
+event loop exits, and the run() method will return.
+
+\skip on_closed
+\until }
+
+So now we have our example working without a broker involved!
+
+Note that for this example we paick an "unusual" port 8888 since we are talking
+to ourselves rather than a broker.
+
+\skipline url =
+
+Asynchronous Send and Receive
+-----------------------------
+
+Of course, these `HelloWorld!` examples are very artificial, communicating as
+they do over a network connection but with the same process. A more realistic
+example involves communication between separate processes (which could indeed be
+running on completely separate machines).
+
+Let's separate the sender from the receiver, and transfer more than a single
+message between them.
+
+We'll start with a simple sender \ref simple_send.cpp.
+
+\dontinclude simple_send.cpp
+
+As with the previous example, we define the application logic in a class that
+handles events. Because we are transferring more than one message, we need to
+keep track of how many we have sent. We'll use a `sent` member variable for
+that.  The `total` member variable will hold the number of messages we want to
+send.
+
+\skip class simple_send
+\until total
+
+As before, we use the `on_start()` event to establish our sender link over which
+we will transfer messages.
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+AMQP defines a credit-based flow control mechanism. Flow control allows
+the receiver to control how many messages it is prepared to receive at a
+given time and thus prevents any component being overwhelmed by the
+number of messages it is sent.
+
+In the `on_sendable()` callback, we check that our sender has credit
+before sending messages. We also check that we haven't already sent the
+required number of messages.
+
+\skip on_sendable
+\until }
+\until }
+
+The `proton::sender::send()` call above is asynchronous. When it returns the
+message has not yet actually been transferred across the network to the
+receiver. By handling the `on_accepted()` event, we can get notified when the
+receiver has received and accepted the message. In our example we use this event
+to track the confirmation of the messages we have sent. We only close the
+connection and exit when the receiver has received all the messages we wanted to
+send.
+
+\skip on_accepted
+\until }
+\until }
+
+If we are disconnected after a message is sent and before it has been
+confirmed by the receiver, it is said to be `in doubt`. We don't know
+whether or not it was received. In this example, we will handle that by
+resending any in-doubt messages. This is known as an 'at-least-once'
+guarantee, since each message should eventually be received at least
+once, though a given message may be received more than once (i.e.
+duplicates are possible). In the `on_disconnected()` callback, we reset
+the sent count to reflect only those that have been confirmed. The
+library will automatically try to reconnect for us, and when our sender
+is sendable again, we can restart from the point we know the receiver
+got to.
+
+\skip on_disconnected
+\until }
+
+\dontinclude simple_recv.cpp
+
+Now let's look at the corresponding receiver \ref simple_recv.cpp
+
+This time we'll use an `expected` member variable for for the number of messages we expecct
and
+a `received` variable to count how many we have received so far.send.
+
+\skip class simple_recv
+\until received
+
+We handle `on_start()` by creating our receiver, much like we
+did for the sender.
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+We also handle the `on_message()` event for received messages and print the
+message out as in the `Hello World!` examples.  However we add some logic to
+allow the receiver to wait for a given number of messages, then to close the
+connection and exit. We also add some logic to check for and ignore duplicates,
+using a simple sequential id scheme.
+
+\skip on_message
+\until }
+
+Direct Send and Receive
+-----------------------
+
+Sending between these two examples requires an intermediary broker since neither
+accepts incoming connections. AMQP allows us to send messages directly between
+two processes. In that case one or other of the processes needs to accept
+incoming connections. Let's create a modified version of the receiving example
+that does this with \ref direct_recv.cpp
+
+\dontinclude direct_recv.cpp
+
+There are only two differences here. Instead of initiating a link (and
+implicitly a connection), we listen for incoming connections.
+
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+When we have received all the expected messages, we then stop listening for
+incoming connections by closing the acceptor object.
+
+\skip on_message
+\until }
+\until }
+\until }
+\until }
+
+You can use the \ref simple_send.cpp example to send to this receiver
+directly. (Note: you will need to stop any broker that is listening on the 5672
+port, or else change the port used by specifying a different address to each
+example via the -a command line switch).
+
+We can also modify the sender to allow the original receiver to connect to it,
+in \ref direct_send.cpp. Again that just requires two modifications:
+
+\dontinclude direct_send.cpp
+
+As with the modified receiver, instead of initiating establishment of a
+link, we listen for incoming connections.
+
+\skip on_start
+\until }
+
+When we have received confirmation of all the messages we sent, we can
+close the acceptor in order to exit.
+
+\skip on_accepted
+\until }
+\until }
+
+To try this modified sender, run the original \ref simple_recv.cpp against it.
+
+The symmetry in the underlying AMQP that enables this is quite unique and
+elegant, and in reflecting this the proton API provides a flexible toolkit for
+implementing all sorts of interesting intermediaries (\ref broker.cpp provided
+as a simple broker for testing purposes is an example of this).
+
+Request/Response
+----------------
+
+\todo TODO missing example in C++
+
+A common pattern is to send a request message and expect a response message in
+return. AMQP has special support for this pattern. Let's have a look at a simple
+example. We'll start with \ref server.cpp, the program that will process the
+request and send the response. Note that we are still using a broker in this
+example.
+
+\todo TODO insert server snips
+
+Our server will provide a very simple service: it will respond with the
+body of the request converted to uppercase.
+
+The code here is not too different from the simple receiver example.  When we
+receive a request however, we look at the proton::message::reply_to address on
+proton::message and create a sender for that over which to send the
+response. We'll cache the senders incase we get further requests with the same
+reply\_to.
+
+Now let's create a simple \ref client.cpp to test this service out.
+
+\todo TODO insert client snips
+
+As well as sending requests, we need to be able to get back the
+responses. We create a receiver for that (see line 14), but we don't
+specify an address, we set the dynamic option which tells the broker we
+are connected to to create a temporary address over which we can receive
+our responses.
+
+We need to use the address allocated by the broker as the reply\_to
+address of our requests, so we can't send them until the broker has
+confirmed our receiving link has been set up (at which point we will
+have our allocated address). To do that, we add an `on_link_opened()`
+method to our handler class, and if the link associated with event is
+the receiver, we use that as the trigger to send our first request.
+
+Again, we could avoid having any intermediary process here if we wished.
+The following code implementas a server to which the client above could
+connect directly without any need for a broker or similar.
+
+\todo TODO missing server_direct.cpp
+
+Though this requires some more extensive changes than the simple sending
+and receiving examples, the essence of the program is still the same.
+Here though, rather than the server establishing a link for the
+response, it relies on the link that the client established, since that
+now comes in directly to the server process.
+
+### Miscellaneous
+
+Many brokers offer the ability to consume messages based on a 'selector'
+that defines which messages are of interest based on particular values
+of the headers. The following example shows how that can be achieved:
+
+\todo TODO selected_recv.cpp
+
+When creating the receiver, we specify a Selector object as an option.
+The options argument can take a single object or a list. Another option
+that is sometimes of interest when using a broker is the ability to
+'browse' the messages on a queue, rather than consumig them. This is
+done in AMQP by specifying a distribution mode of 'copy' (instead of
+'move' which is the expected default for queues). An example of that is
+shown next:
+
+\todo TODO queue_browser.cpp
+*/

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/qpid-proton/blob/c4e2e596/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.md b/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.md
deleted file mode 100644
index e695aaf..0000000
--- a/proton-c/bindings/cpp/docs/tutorial.md
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,362 +0,0 @@
-Tutorial {#tutorial}
-========
-
-This is a brief tutorial that will walk you through the fundamentals of building
-messaging applications in incremental steps. There are further examples, in
-addition the ones mentioned in the tutorial.
-
-Some of the examples require an AMQP *broker* that can receive, store and send
-messages. \ref broker.cpp is a simple example broker which you can use. When run
-without arguments it listens on `0.0.0.0:5672`, the standard AMQP port on all
-network interfaces. To use a different port or network interface:
-
-    broker -a <host>:<port>
-
-Instead of the example broker, you can use any AMQP 1.0 compliant broker. You
-must configure your broker to have a queue (or topic) named "examples".
-
-Most of the examples take an optional URL argument or `-a URL` option the
-URL looks like:
-
-    HOST:PORT/ADDRESS
-
-It usually defaults to `127.0.0.1:5672/examples`, but you can change this if
-your broker is on a different host or port, or you want to use a different queue
-or topic name (the ADDRESS part of the URL). URL details are at `proton::url`
-
-Hello World!
-------------
-
-\dontinclude helloworld.cpp
-
-Tradition dictates that we start with hello world! This example sends a message
-to a broker and the receives the same message back to demonstrate sending and
-receiving. In a realistic system the sender and receiver would normally be in
-different processes. The complete example is \ref helloworld.cpp
-
-We will include the following classes: `proton::container` runs an event loop
-which dispatches events to a `proton::messaging_handler`. This allows a
-*reactive* style of programming which is well suited to messaging
-applications. `proton::url` is a simple parser for the URL format described
-above.
-
-\skip   proton/container
-\until  proton/url
-
-We will define a class `hello_world` which is a subclass of
-`proton::messaging_handler` and over-rides functions to handle the events
-of interest in sending and receiving a message.
-
-\skip class hello_world
-\until {}
-
-`on_start()` is called when the event loop first starts. We handle that by
-establishing a connection and creating a sender and a receiver.
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-`on_sendable()` is called when message can be transferred over the associated
-sender link to the remote peer. We create a `proton::message`, set the message
-body to `"Hello World!"` and send the message. Then we close the sender as we only
-want to send one message. Closing the sender will prevent further calls to
-`on_sendable()`.
-
-\skip on_sendable
-\until }
-
-`on_message()` is called when a message is received. We just print the body of
-the message and close the connection, as we only want one message
-
-\skip on_message
-\until }
-
-The message body is a `proton::value`, see the documentation for more on how to
-extract the message body as type-safe C++ values.
-
-Our `main` function creates an instance of the `hello_world` handler and a
-proton::container using that handler. Calling `proton::container::run` sets
-things in motion and returns when we close the connection as there is nothing
-further to do. It may throw an exception, which will be a subclass of
-`proton::error`. That in turn is a subclass of `std::exception`.
-
-\skip main
-\until }
-\until }
-\until }
-
-Hello World, Direct!
---------------------
-
-\dontinclude helloworld_direct.cpp
-
-Though often used in conjunction with a broker, AMQP does not *require* this. It
-also allows senders and receivers can communicate directly if desired.
-
-We will modify our example to send a message directly to itself. This is a bit
-contrived but illustrates both sides of the direct send/receive scenario. Full
-code at \ref helloworld_direct.cpp
-
-The first difference, is that rather than creating a receiver on the same
-connection as our sender, we listen for incoming connections by invoking the
-`proton::container::listen()` method on the container.
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-As we only need then to initiate one link, the sender, we can do that by
-passing in a url rather than an existing connection, and the connection
-will also be automatically established for us.
-
-We send the message in response to the `on_sendable()` callback and
-print the message out in response to the `on_message()` callback exactly
-as before.
-
-\skip on_sendable
-\until }
-\until }
-
-However we also handle two new events. We now close the connection from
-the senders side once the message has been accepted.
-The acceptance of the message is an indication of successful transfer to the
-peer. We are notified of that event through the `on_accepted()`
-callback.
-
-\skip on_accepted
-\until }
-
-Then, once the connection has been closed, of which we are
-notified through the `on_closed()` callback, we stop accepting incoming
-connections at which point there is no work to be done and the
-event loop exits, and the run() method will return.
-
-\skip on_closed
-\until }
-
-So now we have our example working without a broker involved!
-
-Note that for this example we paick an "unusual" port 8888 since we are talking
-to ourselves rather than a broker.
-
-\skipline url =
-
-Asynchronous Send and Receive
------------------------------
-
-Of course, these `HelloWorld!` examples are very artificial, communicating as
-they do over a network connection but with the same process. A more realistic
-example involves communication between separate processes (which could indeed be
-running on completely separate machines).
-
-Let's separate the sender from the receiver, and transfer more than a single
-message between them.
-
-We'll start with a simple sender \ref simple_send.cpp.
-
-\dontinclude simple_send.cpp
-
-As with the previous example, we define the application logic in a class that
-handles events. Because we are transferring more than one message, we need to
-keep track of how many we have sent. We'll use a `sent` member variable for
-that.  The `total` member variable will hold the number of messages we want to
-send.
-
-\skip class simple_send
-\until total
-
-As before, we use the `on_start()` event to establish our sender link over which
-we will transfer messages.
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-AMQP defines a credit-based flow control mechanism. Flow control allows
-the receiver to control how many messages it is prepared to receive at a
-given time and thus prevents any component being overwhelmed by the
-number of messages it is sent.
-
-In the `on_sendable()` callback, we check that our sender has credit
-before sending messages. We also check that we haven't already sent the
-required number of messages.
-
-\skip on_sendable
-\until }
-\until }
-
-The `proton::sender::send()` call above is asynchronous. When it returns the
-message has not yet actually been transferred across the network to the
-receiver. By handling the `on_accepted()` event, we can get notified when the
-receiver has received and accepted the message. In our example we use this event
-to track the confirmation of the messages we have sent. We only close the
-connection and exit when the receiver has received all the messages we wanted to
-send.
-
-\skip on_accepted
-\until }
-\until }
-
-If we are disconnected after a message is sent and before it has been
-confirmed by the receiver, it is said to be `in doubt`. We don't know
-whether or not it was received. In this example, we will handle that by
-resending any in-doubt messages. This is known as an 'at-least-once'
-guarantee, since each message should eventually be received at least
-once, though a given message may be received more than once (i.e.
-duplicates are possible). In the `on_disconnected()` callback, we reset
-the sent count to reflect only those that have been confirmed. The
-library will automatically try to reconnect for us, and when our sender
-is sendable again, we can restart from the point we know the receiver
-got to.
-
-\skip on_disconnected
-\until }
-
-\dontinclude simple_recv.cpp
-
-Now let's look at the corresponding receiver \ref simple_recv.cpp
-
-This time we'll use an `expected` member variable for for the number of messages we expecct
and
-a `received` variable to count how many we have received so far.send.
-
-\skip class simple_recv
-\until received
-
-We handle `on_start()` by creating our receiver, much like we
-did for the sender.
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-We also handle the `on_message()` event for received messages and print the
-message out as in the `Hello World!` examples.  However we add some logic to
-allow the receiver to wait for a given number of messages, then to close the
-connection and exit. We also add some logic to check for and ignore duplicates,
-using a simple sequential id scheme.
-
-\skip on_message
-\until }
-
-Direct Send and Receive
------------------------
-
-Sending between these two examples requires an intermediary broker since neither
-accepts incoming connections. AMQP allows us to send messages directly between
-two processes. In that case one or other of the processes needs to accept
-incoming connections. Let's create a modified version of the receiving example
-that does this with \ref direct_recv.cpp
-
-\dontinclude direct_recv.cpp
-
-There are only two differences here. Instead of initiating a link (and
-implicitly a connection), we listen for incoming connections.
-
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-When we have received all the expected messages, we then stop listening for
-incoming connections by closing the acceptor object.
-
-\skip on_message
-\until }
-\until }
-\until }
-\until }
-
-You can use the \ref simple_send.cpp example to send to this receiver
-directly. (Note: you will need to stop any broker that is listening on the 5672
-port, or else change the port used by specifying a different address to each
-example via the -a command line switch).
-
-We can also modify the sender to allow the original receiver to connect to it,
-in \ref direct_send.cpp. Again that just requires two modifications:
-
-\dontinclude direct_send.cpp
-
-As with the modified receiver, instead of initiating establishment of a
-link, we listen for incoming connections.
-
-\skip on_start
-\until }
-
-When we have received confirmation of all the messages we sent, we can
-close the acceptor in order to exit.
-
-\skip on_accepted
-\until }
-\until }
-
-To try this modified sender, run the original \ref simple_recv.cpp against it.
-
-The symmetry in the underlying AMQP that enables this is quite unique and
-elegant, and in reflecting this the proton API provides a flexible toolkit for
-implementing all sorts of interesting intermediaries (\ref broker.cpp provided
-as a simple broker for testing purposes is an example of this).
-
-Request/Response
-----------------
-
-\todo TODO missing example in C++
-
-A common pattern is to send a request message and expect a response message in
-return. AMQP has special support for this pattern. Let's have a look at a simple
-example. We'll start with \ref server.cpp, the program that will process the
-request and send the response. Note that we are still using a broker in this
-example.
-
-\todo TODO insert server snips
-
-Our server will provide a very simple service: it will respond with the
-body of the request converted to uppercase.
-
-The code here is not too different from the simple receiver example.  When we
-receive a request however, we look at the proton::message::reply_to address on
-proton::message and create a sender for that over which to send the
-response. We'll cache the senders incase we get further requests with the same
-reply\_to.
-
-Now let's create a simple \ref client.cpp to test this service out.
-
-\todo TODO insert client snips
-
-As well as sending requests, we need to be able to get back the
-responses. We create a receiver for that (see line 14), but we don't
-specify an address, we set the dynamic option which tells the broker we
-are connected to to create a temporary address over which we can receive
-our responses.
-
-We need to use the address allocated by the broker as the reply\_to
-address of our requests, so we can't send them until the broker has
-confirmed our receiving link has been set up (at which point we will
-have our allocated address). To do that, we add an `on_link_opened()`
-method to our handler class, and if the link associated with event is
-the receiver, we use that as the trigger to send our first request.
-
-Again, we could avoid having any intermediary process here if we wished.
-The following code implementas a server to which the client above could
-connect directly without any need for a broker or similar.
-
-\todo TODO missing server_direct.cpp
-
-Though this requires some more extensive changes than the simple sending
-and receiving examples, the essence of the program is still the same.
-Here though, rather than the server establishing a link for the
-response, it relies on the link that the client established, since that
-now comes in directly to the server process.
-
-### Miscellaneous
-
-Many brokers offer the ability to consume messages based on a 'selector'
-that defines which messages are of interest based on particular values
-of the headers. The following example shows how that can be achieved:
-
-\todo TODO selected_recv.cpp
-
-When creating the receiver, we specify a Selector object as an option.
-The options argument can take a single object or a list. Another option
-that is sometimes of interest when using a broker is the ability to
-'browse' the messages on a queue, rather than consumig them. This is
-done in AMQP by specifying a distribution mode of 'copy' (instead of
-'move' which is the expected default for queues). An example of that is
-shown next:
-
-\todo TODO queue_browser.cpp


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