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From Daniel Gabrieli <dgabri...@salesforce.com>
Subject Re: Log-likelihood based correlation test?
Date Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:55:54 GMT
Maybe someone can correct me if I am wrong but in the code I believe
Elasticsearch is used instead of "resulting LLR is what goes into the AB
element in matrix PtP or PtL."

By default the strongest 50 LLR scores get set as searchable values in
Elasticsearch per item-event pair.

You can configure the thresholds for significance using the configuration
parameters: maxCorrelatorsPerItem or minLLR.  And this configuration is
important because at default of 50 you may end up treating all "indicator
values" as significant.  More info here: http://actionml.com/docs/ur_config



On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 4:50 AM Noelia Osés Fernández <noses@vicomtech.org>
wrote:

>
> Let's see if I've understood how LLR is used in UR. Let P be the matrix
> for the primary conversion indicator (say purchases) and Pt its transposed.
>
> Then, with a second matrix, which can be P again to make PtP or a matrix
> for a secondary indicator (say L for likes) to make PtL, we take a row from
> Pt (item A) and a column from the second matrix (either P or L, in this
> example) (item B) and we calculate the table that Ted Dunning explains on
> his webpage: the number of coocurrences that item A *AND* B have been
> purchased (or purchased AND liked), the number of times that item A *OR*
> B have been purchased (or purchased OR liked), and the number of times that
> *neither* item A nor B have been purchased (or purchased or liked). With
> this counts we calculate LLR following the formulas that Ted Dunning
> provides and the resulting LLR is what goes into the AB element in matrix
> PtP or PtL. Correct?
>
> Thank you!
>
> On 16 November 2017 at 17:03, Noelia Osés Fernández <noses@vicomtech.org>
> wrote:
>
>> Wonderful! Thanks Daniel!
>>
>> Suneel, I'm still new to the Apache ecosystem and so I know that Mahout
>> is used but only vaguely... I still don't know the different parts well
>> enough to have a good understanding of what each of them do (Spark, MLLib,
>> PIO, Mahout,...)
>>
>> Thank you both!
>>
>> On 16 November 2017 at 16:59, Suneel Marthi <smarthi@apache.org> wrote:
>>
>>> Indeed so. Ted Dunning is an Apache Mahout PMC and committer and the
>>> whole idea of Search-based Recommenders stems from his work and insights.
>>> If u didn't know, the PIO UR uses Apache Mahout under the hood and hence u
>>> see the LLR.
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 16, 2017 at 3:49 PM, Daniel Gabrieli <
>>> dgabrieli@salesforce.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am pretty sure the LLR stuff in UR is based off of this blog post and
>>>> associated paper:
>>>>
>>>> http://tdunning.blogspot.com/2008/03/surprise-and-coincidence.html
>>>>
>>>> Accurate Methods for the Statistics of Surprise and Coincidence
>>>> by Ted Dunning
>>>>
>>>> http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.14.5962
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Nov 16, 2017 at 10:26 AM Noelia Osés Fernández <
>>>> noses@vicomtech.org> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> I've been trying to understand how the UR algorithm works and I think
>>>>> I have a general idea. But I would like to have a *mathematical
>>>>> description* of the step in which the LLR comes into play. In the CCO
>>>>> presentations I have found it says:
>>>>>
>>>>> (PtP) compares column to column using
>>>>> *log-likelihood based correlation test*
>>>>>
>>>>> However, I have searched for "log-likelihood based correlation test"
>>>>> in google but no joy. All I get are explanations of the likelihood-ratio
>>>>> test to compare two models.
>>>>>
>>>>> I would very much appreciate a math explanation of log-likelihood
>>>>> based correlation test. Any pointers to papers or any other literature
that
>>>>> explains this specifically are much appreciated.
>>>>>
>>>>> Best regards,
>>>>> Noelia
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>>
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