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From Igor Chudov <ichu...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Why people not using mod_perl
Date Thu, 17 Sep 2009 11:52:38 GMT
Interesting. I did not even know about that #2 guy.

What sort of hardware and OS are you running there?

Igor

On Thu, Sep 17, 2009 at 12:54 AM, Jeff Nokes <jeff_nokes@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Well, actually Igor, we ended up writing eBay::API.  We needed something
> that was able to extend many more web services that are internal-use only,
> that the public doesn't have access to.  The fact that eBay web service
> data-types are probably the most complex out there, and they change often,
> we had to come up with a way to easily incorporate those changes by slurping
> up a giant WSDL, and auto-generating all the classes and data types, etc.
>
> But we do thank you for writing that.  I knew of many API clients at the
> time that absolutely loved Net::eBay!  In fact, I think at the time, the #2
> API client (in listings) was perl-based, and using it.
>
> Cheers,
> - Jeff
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Igor Chudov <ichudov@gmail.com>
> *To:* Jeff Nokes <jeff_nokes@yahoo.com>
> *Cc:* Brad Van Sickle <bvs7085@gmail.com>; mod_perl list <
> modperl@perl.apache.org>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 16, 2009 8:26:53 PM
>
> *Subject:* Re: Why people not using mod_perl
>
> You must have use my module Net::eBay, at some point, right?
>
> I wrote Net::eBay about 3 years ago.
>
> Igor
>
> On Wed, Sep 16, 2009 at 9:47 PM, Jeff Nokes <jeff_nokes@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Doesn't Amazon run mod_perl/Mason?
>>
>> BTW, I agree with most of your points (would debate #4,5).  I may
>> substitute the phrase "More convenient" for "Easier" in #3.  I would also
>> add ...
>>
>>    #7)  How many engineers are available to hire that know or want to work
>> with said technology?
>>
>> I built a great platform at eBay on mod_perl/Mason that handled eBay-size
>> traffic; we ran 6 eBay sites on it.  Now it is used for specialty e-commerce
>> solutions like worldofgood.ebay.com, global.ebay.com (cross-border
>> trade), dealfinder.ebay.com, etc.  In fact, on the same hardware, the
>> main eBay Java app would support ~6 threads per box; the mod_perl platform
>> supported ~60 (prefork), significant CapEx and power savings (which adds up
>> at a place like eBay).
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* Brad Van Sickle <bvs7085@gmail.com>
>> *To:* mod_perl list <modperl@perl.apache.org>
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 16, 2009 3:31:30 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: Why people not using mod_perl
>>
>>
>>
>> This is a mod_perl list, so I would expect to see Perl championed pretty
>> heavily, but Java, .net and there ilk are undoubtedly *the* choice for large
>> web applications.  I'd like to get into some discussion as to why almost all
>> *large* sites choose these languages.
>>
>> I don't have any experience developing a large application in Java,
>> although I do have a lot of experience working on the operations side of a
>> large web application that is Java based.
>>
>> The reasons I generally hear for choosing Java over mod_perl are:
>>
>> 1) Speed - I don't buy this at all
>> 2) Maintainability - I think this makes sense.  Perl can be pretty easy to
>> maintain if you stick a good framework around it, but you have to seek out
>> that framework and YOU are responsible for adhereing to it.  All of that is
>> inherent in Java.  It also helps that Java has OO built in.
>> 3) Easier to package and build/move code - In my experience this is true.
>> 4) Advantages to be gained from running on an actually application server
>> - Also valid
>> 5) Compatible enterprise class middleware - Also true, Java plugs into
>> more truly enterprise level suff than Perl does. (security frameworks,
>> etc... )
>> 6) Support
>>
>> A lot of the industry seems look at Perl as obsolete technology that has
>> been replaced by *insert hot new technology of the week here*  which is a
>> total shame.  I've worked with a lot of technologies and I think Perl is a
>> great choice for small/medium websites and webapps, which is probably what
>> most of us work on.  But I'm very interested to know at what point (if any)
>> a site/app grows too large or too complex for mod_perl and what defines that
>> turning point.   Could Amazon run on mod_perl for example?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Phil Carmody wrote:
>>
>> --- On Thu, 9/17/09, Igor Chudov <ichudov@gmail.com> <ichudov@gmail.com>
wrote:
>>
>>  My site algebra.com is about 80,000
>> lines of mod_perl code.
>>
>> I wrote a relatively large framework, with many homegrown
>> perl modules, about five years ago.
>>
>> It uses a database, image generation modules, a big
>> mathematical engine that I wrote (that "shows
>> work", unlike popular third party packages), etc.
>>
>>
>> All pages of my site are dynamic and it is very image heavy
>>
>> due to math formulae.
>>
>> I can say two things:
>>
>> 1) It is relatively fast, serving pages in 0.1 seconds or
>> so
>>
>> 2) Despite the quantity of code, and its age, it is still
>> very maintainable and understandable (to me).
>>
>>      In that case, would you like to fix its mangled output?
>>
>> e.g. http://www.algebra.com/algebra/homework/divisibility/Prime_factorization_algorithm.wikipedia
>>
>> Â Â (Redirected from Prime factorization algorithm)
>>
>> faster than O((1+ε)b) for all positive ε
>>
>> an integer M with 1 ≤ M ≤ N
>>
>> Pollard's p − 1 algorithm
>>
>> Section 4.5.4: Factoring into Primes, pp. 379–417.
>>
>> Chapter 5: Exponential Factoring Algorithms, pp. 191–226. Chapter 6: Subexponential
Factoring Algorithms, pp. 227–284. Section 7.4: Elliptic curve method, pp. 301–313.
>>
>> Eric W. Weisstein, “RSA-640 Factoredâ€
>>
>> v • d • e
>>
>> AKS · APR · Ballie–PSW · ECPP · Fermat · Lucas · Lucas–Lehmer
·
>>  Lucas–Lehmer–Riesel · Proth's theorem · Pépin's · Solovay–Strassen
· Miller–Rabin · Trial division
>>
>> Sieve of Atkin · Sieve of Eratosthenes · Sieve of Sundaram · Wheel factorization
>>
>>
>> CFRAC · Dixon's · ECM · Euler's · Pollard's rho · P − 1 ·
P + 1 · QS · GNFS · SNFS · rational sieve · Fermat's · Shanks' square forms
· Trial division · Shor's
>>
>> Ancient Egyptian multiplication · Aryabhata · Binary GCD · Chakravala ·
Euclidean · Extended Euclidean · integer relation algorithm · integer square root
· Modular exponentiation · Schoof's · Shanks-Tonelli
>>
>>
>>
>> Looks like you've got utf8 and iso8859-1 messed up.
>>
>> Phil
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

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