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From Joe Schaefer <joe_schae...@yahoo.com>
Subject Re: decline and fall of modperl?
Date Fri, 27 Mar 2009 18:33:01 GMT

----- Original Message ----

> From: john edstrom <edstrom@teleport.com>
> To: Joe Schaefer <joe_schaefer@yahoo.com>
> Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 2:21:08 PM
> Subject: Re: decline and fall of modperl?
> 
> If you say so.  I'll respect that, but I don't agree with it.  I already
> subscribe to about 30 mail lists and won't subscribe to the advocacy
> list because I have no particular interest in advocacy per se.  Seeing
> it discussed in a context I care about does interest me though.

Apache operates on the notion of people volunteering to help make
the community's goals come to fruition.  The utility of this particular
list is that users can communicate with one another to solve common
problems, and maybe even offer a patch for the developers to incorporate
into the next release.  That sort of activity has all but dried up here,
and I don't know what the reasons for that are.

It could be that the codebase is "too good", in the sense that there isn't
a lot of stuff that people need fixed.  That has happened to other projects
at the ASF, and knowing all the hard work Stas Bekman and company put into
this project, it may very well be true here.

The goal of modperl is to provide access to httpd's guts so people with
advanced needs can tweak httpd using a scripting language.  Speed is a
nice bonus, but not the full story.  For example, every email sent to
apache.org passes through a mail server that's implemented in mod_perl2.
That's very cool IMO; it solved a major scaling problem for Apache,
and it's the type of application that wasn't even remotely possible with
the 1.x codebase.


      

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