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From s...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/devel/debug c.pod
Date Tue, 22 Apr 2003 06:26:21 GMT
stas        2003/04/21 23:26:21

  Modified:    src/docs/2.0/devel/debug c.pod
  Log:
  document how to enable Solaris to accept core dumps
  Submitted by:	Jim Brandt <cbrandt@buffalo.edu>
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.11      +50 -0     modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/devel/debug/c.pod
  
  Index: c.pod
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/modperl-docs/src/docs/2.0/devel/debug/c.pod,v
  retrieving revision 1.10
  retrieving revision 1.11
  diff -u -r1.10 -r1.11
  --- c.pod	9 Apr 2003 04:23:43 -0000	1.10
  +++ c.pod	22 Apr 2003 06:26:21 -0000	1.11
  @@ -665,6 +665,56 @@
   
   =head2 Obtaining core Files under Solaris
   
  +There are two ways to get core files under Solaris. The first is by
  +configuring the system to allow core dumps, the second is by stopping
  +the process when it receives the SIGSEGV signal and "manually"
  +obtaining the core file.
  +
  +=head3 Configuring Solaris to Allow core Dumps
  +
  +
  +By default, Solaris 8 won't allow a setuid process to write a core
  +file to the file system. Since apache starts as root and spawns
  +children as 'nobody', core dumps won't produce core files unless you
  +modify the system settings.
  +
  +To see the current settings, run the coreadm command with no
  +parameters and you'll see:
  +
  +  % coreadm
  +      global core file pattern:
  +        init core file pattern: core
  +             global core dumps: disabled
  +        per-process core dumps: enabled
  +       global setid core dumps: disabled
  +  per-process setid core dumps: disabled
  +      global core dump logging: disabled
  +
  +These settings are stored in the I</etc/coreadm.conf> file, but you
  +should set them with the coreadm utility. As super-user, you can run
  +coreadm with -g to set the pattern and path for core files (you can
  +use a few variables here) and -e to enable some of the disabled
  +items. After setting a new pattern, enabling global, global-setid, and
  +log, and rebooting the system (reboot is required), the new settings
  +look like:
  +
  +  % coreadm
  +      global core file pattern: /usr/local/apache/cores/core.%f.%p
  +        init core file pattern: core
  +             global core dumps: enabled
  +        per-process core dumps: enabled
  +       global setid core dumps: enabled
  +  per-process setid core dumps: disabled
  +      global core dump logging: enabled
  +
  +Now you'll start to see core files in the designated cores directory
  +and they will look like I<core.httpd.2222> where httpd is the name of
  +the executable and the 2222 is the process id. The new core files will
  +be read/write for root only to maintain some security, and you should
  +probably do this on development systems only.
  +
  +=head3 Manually Obtaining core Dumps
  +
   On Solaris the following method can be used to generate a core file.
   
   =over
  
  
  

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