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From Geoffrey Young <ge...@modperlcookbook.org>
Subject Re: Fwd: failure notice
Date Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:25:29 GMT


David Wheeler wrote:
> Geoff,
> 
> Looks like the Apache mail server didn't like my sending a message to 
> perl.apache.org. Do you know if there is a new announcements address  I
> should use? It looks like this is right, to judge from
> 
>   http://perl.apache.org/maillist/announce.html
> 

hmm, don't know.  cc'ing ask and dev@

--Geoff

> Thanks,
> 
> David
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: MAILER-DAEMON@apache.org
>> Date: January 23, 2006 12:07:47 PM PST
>> To: david@kineticode.com
>> Subject: failure notice
>>
>> Hi. This is the qmail-send program at apache.org.
>> I'm afraid I wasn't able to deliver your message to the following 
>> addresses.
>> This is a permanent error; I've given up. Sorry it didn't work out.
>>
>> <announce@perl.apache.org>:
>> Must be sent from an @apache.org address.
>>
>> --- Below this line is a copy of the message.
>>
>> Return-Path: <david@kineticode.com>
>> Received: (qmail 29917 invoked by uid 99); 23 Jan 2006 20:07:47 -0000
>> Received: from asf.osuosl.org (HELO asf.osuosl.org) (140.211.166.49)
>>     by apache.org (qpsmtpd/0.29) with ESMTP; Mon, 23 Jan 2006 
>> 12:07:47 -0800
>> X-ASF-Spam-Status: No, hits=0.4 required=10.0
>>     tests=WHY_WAIT
>> X-Spam-Check-By: apache.org
>> Received-SPF: neutral (asf.osuosl.org: local policy)
>> Received: from [69.17.117.6] (HELO mail4.sea5.speakeasy.net) 
>> (69.17.117.6)
>>     by apache.org (qpsmtpd/0.29) with ESMTP; Mon, 23 Jan 2006 
>> 12:07:46 -0800
>> Received: (qmail 22100 invoked from network); 23 Jan 2006 20:07:24  -0000
>> Received: from 69-12-140-217.dsl.static.sonic.net (HELO 
>> [192.168.1.103]) (davidw@[69.12.140.217])
>>           (envelope-sender <david@kineticode.com>)
>>           by mail4.sea5.speakeasy.net (qmail-ldap-1.03) with RC4- SHA
>> encrypted SMTP
>>           for <announce@perl.apache.org>; 23 Jan 2006 20:07:24 -0000
>> Mime-Version: 1.0 (Apple Message framework v746.2)
>> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>> Message-Id: <4AFE6EAC-290D-4367-B8D7-EC89132DDDC7@kineticode.com>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed
>> To: announce@perl.apache.org
>> From: David Wheeler <david@kineticode.com>
>> Subject: Bricolage 1.10 Released
>> Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 12:07:24 -0800
>> X-Mailer: Apple Mail (2.746.2)
>> X-Virus-Checked: Checked by ClamAV on apache.org
>>
>>      It is with great pleasure that the Bricolage development team
>> announces
>>      the release of Bricolage 1.10. The culmination of over 19  months of
>>      development, version 1.10 represents a significant advance for  the
>>      celebrated open-source content management and publishing system.
>> Here
>>      are some of the highlights:
>>
>> PHP Templating
>>
>>      Bricolage is the first content management system to support three
>>      different Perl-based templating architectures (Mason, Template
>> Toolkit,
>>      and HTML::Template) as well as one in a completely different
>>      programming language: PHP 5. Bricolage 1.10 adds PHP templating
>>      support, allowing template developers to use the popular Web
>>      programming language to formatting their documents for output.  This
>>      functionality is thanks to a killer new technology, known as
>>      PHP::Interpreter, that loads the PHP 5 interpreter into a Perl 5
>>      interpreter, and affords transparent access between PHP and Perl
>> code.
>>      The upshot is that PHP templaters get full access to the entire
>>      Bricolage API, as well as the ability to use whatever other PHP
>> or Perl
>>      libraries they wish.
>>
>>      Our expect is that this development will push Bricolage into new
>>      environments where PHP developers can make use of the powerful
>> content
>>      management and publishing system without having to learn a new
>>      programming language. Furthermore, we hope that PHP::Interpreter
>> will
>>      act as a bridge between the Perl and PHP communities, such that
>> there
>>      is a greater exchange of ideas and a greater ability to use each
>>      other's libraries.
>>
>>      PHP::Interpreter was developed by OmniTI. PHP::Interpreter and
>> the PHP
>>      templating support in Bricolage were sponsored by SAPO--Portugal
>>      Online.
>>
>> LDAP Authentication
>>
>>      Bricolage 1.10 includes support for a pluggable authentication
>>      architecture, and in addition to its built-in authentication has
>> added
>>      a module for authentication against an LDAP directory server.
>> This new
>>      feature is sure to be welcome in busy enterprises that rely on a
>>      directory server, such as Windows Active Directory
>>      http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/
>> directory/activ
>>      edirectory/default.mspx, Novel eDirectory
>>      http://www.novell.com/products/edirectory/, or OpenLDAP
>>      http://www.openldap.org/. Authentication can be limited to
>> members of a
>>      directory group, and supports LDAP v.3 and TLS connectivity.
>>      Contributed by Kineticode.
>>
>> Revamped Interface
>>
>>      Bricolage 1.10 sports a completely revamped browser interface
>> that is
>>      XHTML compliant and handles all styling via CSS. Yes, our 1999- era
>>      table-driven interface is officially a thing of the past. The
>> upshot is
>>      that the interface is much more elegant, easier to skin with
>> your own
>>      look (by overriding its CSS files), allows search results and
>> editing
>>      fields to expand and contract with the browser window size, and
>>      delivers pages as much as 70% smaller than they were before. The
>> new
>>      interface was Contributed by Marshall Roch.
>>
>>      A second major new UI feature is the revamped "Bulk Edit"
>> interface.
>>      Gone is the old "Super Bulk Edit" interface, with the Bulk Edit
>>      revisions overtaking its functionality. Now you can edit the  entire
>>      contents of a story document, from the top-most element to the
>>      bottom-most field, in a single textarea field with no reloads.
>>
>>      The secret to allowing the full-text editing of Bricolage's  unique
>>      hierarchical element structures is Plain Old Documentation, or
>> "POD".
>>      Subelements are denoted by a new =begin POD tag, and end with a
>>      matching =end tag. The result is a much more natural editing
>> interface.
>>      Even related stories and media are supported by new POD tags. We
>>      believe that this improvement will greatly facilitate the editing
>>      process, making Bricolage a much more enjoyable product for  content
>>      editors to work with.
>>
>>      The Bulk Edit revision is complemented by two new additions: diff
>>      support and a JavaScript-powered "Find and Replace" dialog box.
>> Users
>>      can now see at a glance the changes between one version of a
>> document
>>      and another. The changes are shown on a word-by-word basis, with
>>      additions in green with an underline and deletions in red with a
>>      strikeout. A similar interface is used to show the differences
>> between
>>      versions of templates using the traditional "unified diff" format
>>      rather than word-by word.
>>
>>      The JavaScript-powered "Find and Replace" dialog box can be  used to
>>      search by strings or regular expressions in a Bulk Edit or  Template
>>      editing environment. Found bits of text can also be replaced or
>> even
>>      globally replaced. We believe that this powerful new feature,
>> combined
>>      with the new Bulk Edit interface, makes Bricolage a compelling
>> content
>>      editing environment.
>>
>>      The Bulk Edit, diff, and Find and Replace features were
>> contributed by
>>      Kineticode.
>>
>> What's in a Name?
>>
>>      A somewhat less apparent but no less massive change in Bricolage
>> 1.10
>>      is a system-wide naming normalization. Now all objects in
>> Bricolage are
>>      known by the same names, from the UI to the class to the
>> database to
>>      the SOAP server. Most noticeable in the UI will be the
>> elimination of
>>      the old "Element Type" object, and the renaming of "Element"
>> objects to
>>      "Element Types." This change has the benefit of disambiguating
>> element
>>      types, which define the structure of documents, and elements,
>> which are
>>      the document parts that contain content. Gone is the confusion
>> between
>>      element administration and content elements; there are now only
>> element
>>      types and elements.
>>
>>      Another example is the renaming of "Data Elements" to "Field
>> Types" and
>>      "Fields". And in tandem with this change, the storage of field
>> values
>>      in the database has been denormalized, so that every field value
>> does
>>      not also store the name and key name of the field. This greatly
>> reduces
>>      the size of the database, and should make field lookups much
>> faster,
>>      particularly in formatting templates.
>>
>>      And while we were going about denormalizing field storage, the  data
>>      types of the database columns were also normalized. Old-style,
>>      inefficient column types have been dumped in favor of more
>> efficient,
>>      precise column types. For example, all "NUMERIC" columns, which
>>      everywhere only contained integers or booleans, have been
>> converted the
>>      "INTEGER" and "BOOLEAN" data types, as appropriate. This change
>> will
>>      also be invisible to the everyday Bricolage user, but should
>> enhance
>>      database performance by optimizing the storage of object
>> attributes.
>>
>>      And finally, a more visible change: Bricolage 1.10 introduces
>> much more
>>      flexible URI formats. You can now use many more parts of the
>> cover date
>>      in the URI, and in whatever format you like. So you could have a
>> format
>>      of "/%{categories}/%Y-%m-%d/" and end up with the URI
>>      "/foo/bar/2004-09-22/" if you wanted. Or even "/%{categories}/%Y/
>> %V/"
>>      to get the week number as part of the URI. You can also include
>>      document UUIDs, and even your own text, (e.g. foobar in
>>      /%{categories}/%Y/%m/foobar/%{uuid}/". This enhancement finally
>> allows
>>      users to almost always be able to replicate legacy URI formats in
>>      Bricolage, for a seamless upgrade from an older CMS.
>>
>> What are You Waiting For?
>>
>>      There are many, many more changes in Bricolage 1.10 that,
>> overall, make
>>      using it a joy. For a complete list of the changes, see the  changes
>>      list at
>>      http://www.bricolage.cc/news/announce/changes/bricolage-1.10.0/.
>> For
>>      the complete history of ongoing changes in Bricolage, see
>> Bric::Changes
>>      at http://www.bricolage.cc/docs/current/api/Bric::Changes.
>>
>>      Download Bricolage 1.10.0 now from the Bricolage Website at
>>      http://www.bricolage.cc/downloads/, from the SourceForge
>> download page
>>      at http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=34789,
>> or from
>>      the Kineticode download page at
>>      http://www.kineticode.com/bricolage/downloads/.
>>
>> About Bricolage
>>
>>      Bricolage is a full-featured, enterprise-class content
>> management and
>>      publishing system. It offers a browser-based interface for ease-
>> of use,
>>      a full-fledged templating system with complete HTML::Mason,
>>      HTML::Template, PHP5, and Template Toolkit support for
>> flexibility, and
>>      many other features. It operates in an Apache/mod_perl
>> environment and
>>      uses the PostgreSQL RDBMS for its repository. A comprehensive,
>>      actively-developed open source CMS, Bricolage has been hailed by
>> eWEEK
>>      as "quite possibly the most capable enterprise-class open-source
>>      application available."
>>
>>      Enjoy!
>>
>>      --The Bricolage Team
>>
>>

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