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From Alexandro Colorado <...@oooes.org>
Subject Re: A question about existing practices
Date Wed, 20 Mar 2013 16:06:53 GMT
On 3/20/13, Rob Weir <robweir@apache.org> wrote:
> On Sun, Mar 17, 2013 at 6:39 PM, Andrea Pescetti <pescetti@apache.org>
> wrote:
>> Hagar Delest wrote:
>>>
>>> if the votes are reset, I'll take it as a huge setback for the users
>>> decisions
>>
>>
>> Resetting votes does not make sense. There is a limit on how many bugs a
>> user can vote for and votes can be reallocated, so it isn't necessarily
>> true
>> that an old bug has more votes just because it's been around for longer.
>> But
>> it's true that we are not advertising the possibility to vote as much as
>> we
>> used to: many new users are likely unaware that they can vote.
>>
>
> I was curious to check my intuition on this.  So with a bit of effort
> I was able to get the following data out of Bugzilla, showing the
> yearly percentage of enhancement or feature issue types have had at
> least one vote.  So it is showing for issues entered in that year,
> what % of those issues have received votes.
>
> Year	  %Votes
> 2002	  45%
> 2003	  39%
> 2004	  34%
> 2005	  31%
> 2006	  30%
> 2007	  24%
> 2008	  23%
> 2009	  23%
> 2010	  14%
> 2011	    5%
> 2012	    6%
> 2013	    2%
>
> I see a trend here, a very strong one.  Plot it and you see a nearly
> linear trend (r = - 0.98).   Older issues have received more votes
> than new issuers.
>
> There could be several reasons for this:
>
> 1) Older issues are better issues because they were entered by smarter
> people.  But then the linear trend is then odd.  Did people become
> less smart in such a regular way over the years?
>
> 2) Older issues have been around longer so they have had a longer
> opportunity to be voted on.  This very naturally would explain a
> linear trend.

+1

>
> 3) Users have become less interested in or aware of voting.  But
> again, it hard to explain the gradual linear trend.  Why for example,
> would users in 2010 entering an issue not even vote for their own
> issue 90% of the time, but in 2002 nearly half of those issues
> received votes?
>
> In any case, this is one reason why I take the old vote counts cum
> grano salis.  For whatever reason the votes are biased toward older
> issues.
>
> -Rob
>
>>>> [Rob] Google Moderator was far easier to use for users than BZ is. That
>>>> is
>>>>
>>>> why we received far more feedback with Moderator. I'm sorry that the
>>>> troglodytes don't like that.
>>
>>
>> Not only troglodytes. Many users interpret the votes in Bugzilla as their
>> opportunity to influence the OpenOffice decisions (and would find
>> offensive
>> to be assimilated to troglodytes). Honestly, except for a couple of
>> occasions years ago when a review of "most voted issues" was done, votes
>> are
>> scarcely taken into consideration. This is the problem.
>>
>> There is room for improvement here: you once posted the most voted
>> issues,
>> but if we made it regularly and we committed to fixing the most voted
>> issues
>> (or, more realistically, to direct to the most voted issues people who
>> want
>> to help with development or sponsor it), things would improve.
>>
>> Regards,
>>   Andrea.
>>
>>
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>
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>


-- 
Alexandro Colorado
Apache OpenOffice Contributor
http://es.openoffice.org

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