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From "Ryan, Benjamin" <8...@trinitylismore.nsw.edu.au>
Subject RE: Case Study on Open Office
Date Sat, 02 Feb 2013 23:22:55 GMT
1. Identify the software development approaches used in the development of the Software? e.g
Open office
What software development approaches were used eg Structured(top-down) prototyping,RAD or
Agile

6. Evaluate how effectively the new system met the needs of the user or the target market?
How the software has met the needs of the user and target audience
At the current statistics Open office has taken 14% of Microsoft offices sale which is quiet
significant
Market-Share etc

If anyone else could add or extend on any of the questions i would be very grateful



________________________________________
From: Rob Weir [robweir@apache.org]
Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 3:39 AM
To: dev@openoffice.apache.org; Ryan, Benjamin
Subject: Re: Case Study on Open Office

On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 5:15 PM, Ryan, Benjamin
<8193@trinitylismore.nsw.edu.au> wrote:
> Hello Open Office Developers sorry to bother you but I am in need of some help
>
> I am doing a school Assignment (Case Study) on a particular Software Solution and I chose
to do "Open Office" but i need to find some answer to these questions.
>
>
>
> 1. Identify the software development approaches used in the development of the Software?
e.g Open office
>

I'm not sure exactly what you are looking for here.  A "development
approach" comprises many factors, from choice of design methodologies,
approaches to organization, decision making licensing and business
models, etc.

Apache OpenOffice is community-developed open source software.  Open
source software is software where the program, as well as the source
code for the program, is made available to users free of charge.
Users not only can use the software, but they can make copies of it
and give it to their friends.  They can even modify the software and
distribute their own versions of it, for free or at any price they
chose.

OpenOffice is developed by a community of volunteers within the Apache
Software Foundation, a non-profit foundation with the mission of
providing free, open source software to the public.

As you can see, the underlying motivation and organization of the
project is different than the typical for-profit, corporate-run
software publisher.  But at the level of the actual software
development, and the methodologies used, it is not very different than
commercial development.  I'd describe what we do as generally an agile
process with a flat organizational hierarchy guided by set of shared
beliefs sometimes called "The Apache Way".  You can read more about
this here:  http://www.apache.org/foundation/how-it-works.html


> 2. Discuss the appropriateness of the approaches used.Why was this approach chosen?
>

Since the work is done by volunteers, a top-down hierarchical approach
cannot work.  No one can order a volunteer to do something.  It must
be something they want to do, something that they are interested it
and enjoy doing.

This is not the only way that open source software can be developed.
Other approach include:

a) Having a for-profit corporation control the project, allowing
volunteers to contribute, but control is firmly with the corporation.

b) Having a "benevolent dictator" who makes the major decisions.

c) Having an oligarchy "committee within the committee" that makes all
the decisions.

In Apache projects, however, the decision making is much flatter. For
example we have over 120 "committers" in the OpenOffice project. Any
of them can make code changes, and any of them can veto code changes
from others.  So the power is very distributed, a flat organizational
hierarchy.


> 3. Describe how the various personal involved in the process, contribute to the overall
development?
>

We use a lowest-common denominator technical approach to
collaboration, relying mainly on mailing lists, wikis and version
control to collaborate.  Since we're spread out all over the world,
these kinds of tools work well.  We're not all in the same timezone,
so little of our collaboration is in real-time.

We use a main mailing list (the "dev" list) for overall project
coordination, and then also have specialized lists for QA, Marketing,
Translation, Documentation, etc.

> 4. Evaluate how social and ethical issues were addressed?
>

See: http://www.openoffice.org/stats/ooo-dev-subscribers.html

> 6. Evaluate how effectively the new system met the needs of the user or the target market?
>

I would not say the system is "new".  Apache has been around since
1999, and the basic approach toward community-led open source projects
is well-established and replicated in many other organizations.  The
fact that we have had over 35 million downloads of our most recent
release of OpenOffice (3.4) is a good sign.  The fact that Apache as a
foundation publishes many of the top open source projects in use today
is another good sign that The Apache Way to community open source
development is a powerful approach.

Regards,

-Rob

>
> If you could help me in any way to answer a few questions or all of the questions I would
be very grateful and thank you for your time in advance.
>
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