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From build...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1039889 - in /websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content: ./ orientation/decision-making.html
Date Sat, 02 Feb 2019 14:40:50 GMT
Author: buildbot
Date: Sat Feb  2 14:40:50 2019
New Revision: 1039889

Log:
Staging update by buildbot for openoffice

Modified:
    websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/   (props changed)
    websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/orientation/decision-making.html

Propchange: websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- cms:source-revision (original)
+++ cms:source-revision Sat Feb  2 14:40:50 2019
@@ -1 +1 @@
-1852771
+1852798

Modified: websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/orientation/decision-making.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/orientation/decision-making.html (original)
+++ websites/staging/openoffice/trunk/content/orientation/decision-making.html Sat Feb  2
14:40:50 2019
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ h2:hover > .headerlink, h3:hover > .head
 <p>Commit-Then-Review (CTR) and Review-Then-Commit (RTC).</p>
 <p>The two primary ways of managing product changes go by the names Commit-Then-Review
(CTR) and Review-Then-Commit (RTC). For most cases we operate in a CTR mode, meaning that
our <a href="https://www.apache.org/foundation/how-it-works.html#committers">Committers</a>
are able to check in changes as they desire, with no advance approval or review.</p>
 <p>We trust our Committers to do the right thing. By default Committers don't ask permission
before acting. They avoid unnecessary discussion and email traffic. This is not because they
are anti-social. This is because they realize that in a project of this size it is impossible
to discuss every small change in advance. Discussing too much is both 
-unnecessary and unproductive. We have a "time machine" called Subversion that allows us to
undo any changes to the product or website. So if a Committer believes that a     change would
be uncontroversial, and the change is reversible, then the default approach is to go ahead
make the change.</p>
+unnecessary and unproductive. We have a "time machine" called Subversion that allows us to
undo any changes to the product or website. So if a Committer believes that a change would
be uncontroversial, and the change is reversible, then the default approach is to go ahead
make the change.</p>
 <p>Terms that you might need to know related to the above are: <a href="https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=JFDI">JFDI</a>
and <a href="https://www.apache.org/foundation/glossary.html#LazyConsensus">"assuming
lazy consensus"</a>.</p>
 </li>
 <li>
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ list.</p>
 <li>
 <p>Proposals</p>
 <p>The convention is to send all proposals in their own new thread. (Don't hide a proposal
10 posts deep in an existing thread). Put "[PROPOSAL]" in the subject line or make it obvious
that you are making a proposal.</p>
-<p>Because the Volunteers are spread out all across the globe, in various time zones,
and many have day jobs or other committments, the convention is to wait <em>at least</em>
72 hours for feedback on a proposal.</p>
+<p>Because the Volunteers are spread out all across the globe, in various time zones,
and many have day jobs or other commitments, the convention is to wait <em>at least</em>
72 hours for feedback on a proposal.</p>
 <p>In cases where the proposer wants to act on their proposal, if there are no objections,
they should state this in the proposal. For example, "If there are no objections voiced within
72 hours, I'll go ahead and make these changes". This is called "stating lazy consensus".
You can read more about lazy consensus <a href="https://openoffice.apache.org/docs/governance/lazyConsensus.html">here</a>.</p>
 </li>
 <li>



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