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From Jonathon -- Improov <j...@improov.com>
Subject Re: CRM - Customer Relationship Management facilities in OFBiz
Date Thu, 04 Oct 2007 15:02:12 GMT
Hi Philip,

Thanks for the insights regarding Java and Javascript. I know they are not the same.

Just a correction to something I wrote, by the way. Javascript isn't as fast as C/C++. The
engine 
that interprets and runs Javascript is probably built with C/C++. But Javascript itself is
an 
interpreted language. Java is half-interpreted (or half-compiled or half-digested). I would
expect 
Java to be faster than Javascript.

 > Java is equally as powerful as C or C++ and is NOT a client side
 > scripting that depends on a client computer for processing and does
 > not need anything activated in the web browser to run.

Java is simply a language. Just as a server-client app can be coded entirely in C/C++, so
can it 
be done in Java. OFBiz framework is done in Java.

The way Skip was using Java, it was a client side component.

Java's mechanisms for object-oriented programming is as robust, and certainly as "reference",
as 
C/C++. Schools usually use Java to teach object-oriented concepts.

 > Java and JavaScript are commonly mistaken as somehow related to each
 > other however this is not true

What did I say that made you think I mistook them to be related or even remotely similar?
:)

By the way, Javascript does allow some form of object-oriented programming. Check out Dojo.
So, 
when considering candidates for client side components, Javascript can be almost as attractive
as 
Java for the reasons I mentioned (browser support, browser development for various platforms,
etc).

Jonathon

Philip Laing wrote:
> Hi Jonathon
> JavaScript is entirely unassimilated with Java ... They are two separate
> programming languages with two different origins.  JavaScript is entirely
> client side browser scripting and Java is an entire programming language
> which is similar to C syntax, although with similar names and similar
> syntax.
> 
> "JavaScript was originally developed by Brendan Eich of Netscape under the
> name Mocha, later LiveScript, and finally renamed to JavaScript. The change
> of name from LiveScript to JavaScript roughly coincided with Netscape adding
> support for Java technology in its Netscape Navigator web browser." -
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javascript#History_and_naming 
> 
> "The Java language was created by James Gosling in June 1991 for use in a
> set top box project. The language was initially called Oak, after an oak
> tree that stood outside Gosling's office - and also went by the name Green -
> and ended up later being renamed to Java, from a list of random words.
> Gosling's goals were to implement a virtual machine and a language that had
> a familiar C/C++ style of notation"
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_%28programming_language%29#History
> 
> Java is equally as powerful as C or C++ and is NOT a client side scripting
> that depends on a client computer for processing and does not need anything
> activated in the web browser to run.
> 
> JavaServer Pages (JSPs) are server-side Java EE components that generate
> responses, typically HTML pages, to HTTP requests from clients much the same
> as ASP
> 
> Java and JavaScript are commonly mistaken as somehow related to each other
> however this is not true
> 
> cheers
> 
> 
> Phil 
> 
> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Jonathon -- Improov [mailto:jonw@improov.com]
>> Sent: Thursday, 4 October 2007 5:06 PM
>> To: user@ofbiz.apache.org
>> Subject: Re: CRM - Customer Relationship Management facilities in OFBiz
>>
>> Compiere has a similar "auto-deploy" mechanism. So that solves the
>> "deploy" issue. There's still
>> the issue of creating and maintaining 2 separate UI modules: one for Java
>> app, the other for browser.
>>
>> Which reminds me. OFBiz browser UIs don't care about the case where
>> javascript is disabled.
>> Anyway, javascript can be selectively enabled (in the browser) for sites
>> that the end-user trusts.
>> The only place where this could be a problem is in the ecommmerce side,
>> the public-facing end. In
>> backoffice UIs, it's to mandate javascript.
>>
>> Jonathon
>>
>> Raj Saini wrote:
>>>> I was thinking more in terms of IT department savings. The
>>>> "create/maintain/deploy" human activities can be quite a bit more
>>>> expensive (IT consultants) than backoffice personnel, I would think.
>>>> Is that the case where you are?
>>>>
>>> With the new update technologies, I don't think this is a issue now.
>>> Take example how Firefox updates itself without going through the pain
>>> of manual deployment. Eclipse RCP has similar update manager, which is
>>> used by Eclipse RCP based applications for auto update the new releases.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Raj
>>>
>>>
>>>
> 
> 


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