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From Sean Schofield <sean.schofi...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Login system security
Date Thu, 06 Oct 2005 16:34:41 GMT
I can vouch for what Duncan is saying.  We were able to write our own
custom authenticator for OC4J.  It used Windows Active Directory for
authentication and Open LDAP for authorization.  It was a bit more
cumbersome than Tomcat but it worked fine.

sean

On 10/5/05, Duncan Mills <duncan.mills@oracle.com> wrote:
>  Several Points here
>  1) Using Security Attributes within your pages.
>  I'm about to release 1.0 of the jsf-security project on SourceForge
> (www.sourceforge.net/projects/jsf-security) this provides
> extensions to EL which will give you a new scope #{securityScope} and a
> bunch of attributes and pseudo functions such as
> #{securityScope.isUserInRole['manager,admin']} which allow you to  use
> expressions to control rendering and read-only states of components - even
> if they are not "role" enabled in the way that the myfaces components are.
> jsf-security is fully pluggable and so if you use Acegi or a home grown
> Authorization / Authentication mechanism you can plug it in underneath the
> same consistent EL.
>  The current version hooks into Container Security, and we've just started a
> JAAS adapter as well.
>  If anyone wants to get involved - particularly of you use Acegi today get
> in touch.
>  For more info on this see this blog entry: and the project on SF. You can
> pull the source from CVS today and build - it all works I just need to write
> the doc and the localize the message strings...
>
>  2) Using the database to Authenticate / Authorize
>  Your mileage will vary from container to container, but with OC4J (& Oracle
> App server) you can plus in your own custom login modules that can do just
> this - Frank and I who work on the jsf-security project just posted a paper
> on that process a few weeks back:
>  Declarative J2EE authentication and authorization with JAAS
>
>
>  Duncan
>
>
>
>  Dave wrote:
>
> hi Andrew,
>
> How to get a Realm object so that I can call authenticate()? I am using
> Database to store username and password. Thanks.
>
>  Andrew robinson <andrew.rw.robinson@gmail.com> wrote:
> I am using the built in Tomcat DataSourceRealm so that single sign-on is
> possible. My login is still using a normal JSP instead of JSF, so I can't
> use JSF components to build my login page. Has anyone integrated the
> form-base web.xml authentication with a JSF login page?
>
>
> On 10/4/05, Mike Kienenberger <mkienenb@gmail.com > wrote:
> I've switch from a login page to a filter that authenticates and sets
>  the User database record in the session.  (Actually, I fetch this
>  record every request, and store it in the request, but that may be too
>  excessive for your situation).
>
>  I then have additional filters that work on that data to provide
>  coarse-grain security (ie, if you don't pass the filter, you can't
>  access any of the application).
>
>  I also have a SecurityRoleManager bean that provides fine-grain
>  control by operating on the record stored in the session.   Ie,
>  "securityRoleManager.canEditDate()"
>
>  On 10/4/05, Eurig Jones <eurig.jones@fugro-robertson.com> wrote:
>  > I'm trying to decide on a Login/Logout system to protect my files using
>  > JSF.. I've played about with extending NavigationHandler, but the
>  > problem is, it doesn't protect the files which aren't JSF, and you can
>  > still run the JSP files if you wanted to...
>  >
>  > How have you people gone about a database driven login/logout system
>  > using Faces?
>  >
>
>
>
>  Yahoo! for Good
>  Click here to donate to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.
>  --
>
> Regards
>
> Duncan Mills
> Senior Principal Product Manager
> Oracle Application Development Tools
>
> Duncan.Mills@oracle.com
>

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