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From "Zhao, Patric" <patric.z...@intel.com>
Subject RE: Call for Ideas and Approaches to Community Building
Date Sun, 17 Mar 2019 14:17:26 GMT
Very great points!   

+1 for 4) and 5)


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Zach Boldyga [mailto:zach@scalabull.com]
> Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:33 AM
> To: dev@mxnet.incubator.apache.org
> Subject: Re: Call for Ideas and Approaches to Community Building
> 
> This is a great discussion, thanks for opening, Carin!
> 
> As a newcomer to MXNet and Apache communities in general, I’ve been
> considering what I can bring to the table here, and what importance it would
> have to me.
> 
> I'm not employed by large organizations, and communities like this are
> perhaps the only way to be involved in projects of such a large scale and
> importance. An opportunity to join this type of team without the full
> commitment of employment is fantastic! I see potential for this to be a form
> of validation, a chance to meet others and build professional relationships,
> and a vehicle to learn from some of the most well-educated people in the
> industry.
> 
> That said, here’s what I’ve noticed thus far:
> 
> 1. There is a healthy amount of activity in Github Issues, and the committers
> are doing a great job at allowing newcomers to jump in. I was able to get
> started on my first ticket within 10 minutes of searching thru issues.
> 
> 2. The dev mailing list is a great place to discuss all of the nuances of the
> project. I also like meeting people and it would be rewarding to get to know
> people in the community via Skype or in-person meetups! This doesn’t have
> to be for everyone, and I don’t think it’s appropriate for Q&A, but for some
> people a social element purely for the sake of putting names with faces can
> be rewarding. I’m open to virtual meetups :)
> 
> 3. My first commit was smooth. When approaching the second one, I’m
> hitting some hiccups. For instance, I recently created a JIRA ticket based on a
> Github Issue some users reported, and the ticket has been sitting for a week
> without any activity. Should I just dig in and open a PR? How do the
> commiters decide what can and can’t reasonably go into the project? We
> may be able to make some changes to the contribution documentation or
> processes to make it easier for first time contributors to ramp-up into regular
> contributors?
> 
> 4. I would love to see more discussion about the future of MXNet. I imagine
> those who have been involved in the project for a long time have thoughts
> about next major steps, but as an outsider I’m not sure where to find this
> information. The roadmap on Github is fairly short-term and outdated, and
> lots of interesting ideas are sprouting in projects like TF Swift as of 2019.
> 
> 5. Something I’ve observed across many Apache projects: there isn’t much
> focus on marketing. I wonder why? A tool like Tensorflow is reaching 10x
> more people, mainly because of marketing.
> 
> Best,
> 
> Zach Boldyga
> Scalabull  |  Founder
> 1 (866) 846-8771 x 101
> 
> 
> On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 5:38 AM Tianqi Chen <tqchen@cs.washington.edu>
> wrote:
> 
> > what happens (also) happens in the mail-list.
> >
> > If there is a certain things or person’s contribution is only known by
> > colleagues, it is a indication of things that should be improved
> > toward more apache way.
> >
> > Tianqi
> >
> > On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 4:42 AM Isabel Drost-Fromm <isabel@apache.org>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > On Wed, Mar 06, 2019 at 10:03:57PM -0800, Steffen Rochel wrote:
> > > > I agree with Tianqi on "One approach toward building a more
> > > > diverse community is to acknowledge the fact that we want to
> > > > encourage
> > > interactions
> > > > in the Apache way beyond our physical cycle." However, I disagree
> > > > with
> > > his
> > > > suggestion regarding "One principle to toward that is to encourage
> > > > PMC members only nominate committers from other organizations" for
> > > > the following reasons: [...]
> > >
> > > I spent quite some time digging remembering that a similar topic had
> > > been discussed somewhere at the ASF at some point in time with many
> > > whys, pros and cons towards contributor employer diversity - finally
> > > found a long and winding thread there:
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> https://lists.apache.org/thread.html/7a7412316ddbe1d43f5fb3d3703ea25a6
> >
> b26e56de602e27e175785c0@1337815698@%3Cgeneral.incubator.apache.or
> g%3E
> > >
> > >
> > > There is one answer in there from Roy Fielding which has a similar
> > > story to the one that you are describing, Steffen. My main takeaway
> > > of what was discussed back then: "Diversity is only a warning sign
> > > that means we need to check for decisions made in our forums and
> > > advise accordingly."
> > >
> > > The questions I personally tend to ask myself: How easy is it to
> > > follow
> > the
> > > project from just subscribing to it's mailing lists (remember the
> > > "if it didn't happen on the mailing list, it didn't happen"), get
> > > active, get involved, be treated as a fellow project member and be
> > > voted in as committer and PMC member.
> > >
> > > For a more condensed text on the topic of "ASF projects are made of
> > > individuals"
> > > you might also want to check out the ASF guidelines over there:
> > > https://www.confluent.io/apache-engineering-guidelines/
> > > https://www.confluent.io/apache-guidelines
> > >
> > > Related material was published at ApacheCon :
> > > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFNE0IpKOxU
> > >
> > > There's also lovely content that was recently produced over at
> > > dev@community:
> > >
> > >
> >
> https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/183nXPAxpJymQBOYOt1FnFaahRcQ
> skI
> > vOyIvHRC6UAnE/edit#slide=id.g4a86a2ca5a_0_69
> > >
> > >
> > > Isabel
> > >
> > >
> >
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