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From Kasper Sørensen <i.am.kasper.soren...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Attracting contributions
Date Mon, 28 Apr 2014 17:10:51 GMT
Regarding twitter profile ... I can create one ... Any conventions or
Apache rules or anything like that, which needs to be applied/conformed to?

Kasper


2014-04-06 19:46 GMT+02:00 Henry Saputra <henry.saputra@gmail.com>:

> Thanks Kasper!
>
> On Sun, Apr 6, 2014 at 2:40 AM, Kasper Sørensen
> <i.am.kasper.sorensen@gmail.com> wrote:
> > We should get that set up then.
> >
> > In the mean time I also started labeling some of the issues in JIRA with
> a
> > 'starter' label:
> >
> https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/METAMODEL-17?jql=project%20%3D%20METAMODEL%20AND%20labels%20%3D%20starter
> >
> > I suppose we should advertise that tag somewhere on the website for
> people
> > who would like to start contributing.
> >
> >
> > 2014-04-03 13:22 GMT+02:00 Noah Slater <nslater@apache.org>:
> >
> >> Infra can set us up with a MetaModel blog under blogs.apache.org.
> >>
> >> On 3 April 2014 12:45, Kasper Sørensen <i.am.kasper.sorensen@gmail.com>
> >> wrote:
> >> > Hi Noah,
> >> >
> >> > Thank you for mentioning this worry and for all the good ideas to
> create
> >> > more traction.
> >> >
> >> > It's an overwhelming lot of work, so I don't think we can ask anyone
> in
> >> > particular to do all this, but that we all need to be more proactive
> in
> >> > promoting the project. One part that I think I can help with is maybe
> >> > blogging about how we use MetaModel in the case of DataCleaner (
> >> > www.datacleaner.org). You mention that we should have a project blog.
> >> How
> >> > is that done? I have a personal blog that I could post it on, but
> what is
> >> > the usual approach when making a project blog?
> >> >
> >> > Kasper
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > 2014-04-02 14:22 GMT+02:00 Noah Slater <nslater@apache.org>:
> >> >
> >> >> Hi folks,
> >> >>
> >> >> We've not elected anybody to the committership since we started
> >> >> incubation, as far as I can tell. Learning how to do this is a really
> >> >> important part of incubation, so why don't we kick start the effort
> >> >> now? :)
> >> >>
> >> >> There are multiple parts to this:
> >> >>
> >> >> 1. Making the project attractive to potential contributors
> >> >> 2. Making it easy to start contributing
> >> >> 3. Recognising merit in people who do contribute
> >> >> 4. The formality of electing those people to the committership
> >> >>
> >> >> Now, we've been working on (1) since we started incubating. It's the
> >> >> rest we need to pay attention to now. But briefly, here are some
> >> >> ideas:
> >> >>
> >> >> - Have a nice website that clearly explains what the project does
> >> >> - Have friendly, active mailing lists where people's questions are
> >> answered
> >> >> - Put out regular releases and share the news of this around the web
> >> >> - Start a project blog, or something similar, and communicate project
> >> news
> >> >> - Set up a Twitter account, etc, and talk about the project a lot in
> >> >> other places
> >> >>
> >> >> This is, essentially, marketing activity. Which I know a lot of folks
> >> >> have an allergic reaction to. But it's essential to getting the word
> >> >> out. Which is your first step if you want to convert people into
> >> >> contributors. :)
> >> >>
> >> >> Okay, for step (2), there are lots things to do:
> >> >>
> >> >> - Add a "starter" tag to your JIRA tickets, which means "this is
> ideal
> >> >> for people who are just starting out with the code base". Document
> >> >> this tag on the project homepage, and make it abundantly clear that
> >> >> contribution is welcome!
> >> >> - Add "easy", "medium", and "hard" tags. These serve a similar
> function.
> >> >> - Get the GitHub integration set up and functioning as a first class
> >> >> contribution method. Document this on the website. Make the top level
> >> >> files in our repository "GitHub friendly" (i.e. they display nicely
> on
> >> >> GitHub)
> >> >> - Add documentation. Lots of it. Start with a CONTRIBUTING.md file
at
> >> >> the root of the repository, and make it very very easy to get started
> >> >> - Consider having weekly or monthly Google Hangouts, or webcasts, or
> >> >> write blog posts about specific modules or parts of the code
> >> >> - Keep a keen eye out for anyone on the lists who looks like they
> >> >> *might* be interested in contributing and gently prod them in the
> >> >> right direction. Be friendly, encouraging, and thankful
> >> >>
> >> >> Step (3) is starting to get more process oriented, but basically:
> >> >>
> >> >> - Look at people opening tickets, creating pull requests, answering
> >> >> questions on the mailing lists, submitting patches, etc. Set up some
> >> >> sort of weekly or monthly reminder for yourself or the whole PMC to
> do
> >> >> this
> >> >> - Remind yourself that code is not the only way to contribute. We're
> >> >> interested in attracting any sort of help. Be that with code,
> >> >> documentation, project organisation, community management, marketing,
> >> >> QA, tests, ticket triage, user support, etc
> >> >> - As soon as you spot a likely candidate, bring it up on the
> private@list
> >> >>
> >> >> Step (4) is easy, and I can guide you though that when the time
> comes.
> >> >>
> >> >> Thanks,
> >> >>
> >> >> --
> >> >> Noah Slater
> >> >> https://twitter.com/nslater
> >> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Noah Slater
> >> https://twitter.com/nslater
> >>
>

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