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From br...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc about.fml index.xml maven1.fml
Date Thu, 07 Apr 2005 13:12:05 GMT
brett       2005/04/07 06:12:05

  Modified:    maven-site/src/site/xdoc about.fml index.xml maven1.fml
  Log:
  flesh out documents
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.3       +1 -0      maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/about.fml
  
  Index: about.fml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/about.fml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- about.fml	7 Apr 2005 07:39:14 -0000	1.2
  +++ about.fml	7 Apr 2005 13:12:05 -0000	1.3
  @@ -32,6 +32,7 @@
             <li>Simple project setup that follows best practices - get a new project
or module started in seconds</li>
             <li>Consistent usage across all projects means no ramp up time for new
developers coming onto a project</li>
             <li>Superior dependency management including automatic updating, dependency
closures (also known as transitive dependencies)</li>
  +          <li>Able to easily work with multiple projects at a time</li>
             <li>A large and growing repository of libraries and metadata to use out
of the box, and arrangements in place
             with the largest Open Source projects for real-time availability of their latest
releases</li>
             <li>Extensible, with the ability to easily write plugins in Java or other
scripting languages</li>
  
  
  
  1.4       +4 -4      maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/index.xml
  
  Index: index.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/index.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- index.xml	7 Apr 2005 07:39:14 -0000	1.3
  +++ index.xml	7 Apr 2005 13:12:05 -0000	1.4
  @@ -11,8 +11,8 @@
             <a href="download.html">
               <img valign="top" src="http://maven.apache.org/images/folder-open.gif" border="0"
alt="" title="download"/>
               Download
  -          </a> Maven 2.0 Build 1
  -          <small>(682K)</small>
  +          </a> Maven 2.0 Alpha 1
  +          <small>(690K)</small>
             <br/>
           </p>
           <ul style="margin-top: 0">
  @@ -95,12 +95,12 @@
           </li>
           <li>
             <i>
  -            <a href="maven1.html#">What will happen</a> to Maven 1.0?
  +            <a href="maven1.html#m1-future">What will happen</a> to Maven 1.0?
             </i>
           </li>
           <li>
             <i>Will my
  -            <a href="maven1.html#">Maven 1.0 plugins</a> be supported?
  +            <a href="maven1.html#m1-plugins">Maven 1.0 plugins</a> be supported?
             </i>
           </li>
         </ul>
  
  
  
  1.2       +134 -0    maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/maven1.fml
  
  Index: maven1.fml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/maven-components/maven-site/src/site/xdoc/maven1.fml,v
  retrieving revision 1.1
  retrieving revision 1.2
  diff -u -r1.1 -r1.2
  --- maven1.fml	7 Apr 2005 07:39:14 -0000	1.1
  +++ maven1.fml	7 Apr 2005 13:12:05 -0000	1.2
  @@ -1,6 +1,140 @@
   <faqs title="Information for Maven 1.0 Users">
   
     <part id="maven1">
  +    <faq id="changed">
  +      <question>What's Changed?</question>
  +      <answer>
  +        <p>
  +          Maven 2.0 will feel very different to a Maven 1.0 user - and perhaps a little
strange. But it is a lot simpler
  +          to work with! The key changes from Maven 1.0 are:
  +        </p>
  +        <ul>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Faster and smaller</i> - The Maven core no longer uses Ant,
Jelly or Xerces making it much smaller, has
  +            fewer dependencies and is perfect for embedding in other tools.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Defined build lifecycle</i> - No more
  +            <code>prereqs</code>,
  +            <code>preGoals</code> and
  +            <code>postGoals</code>.
  +            The build is a series of well defined phases. This also means that the normal
goal names are not used -
  +            <code>compile</code>,
  +            <code>test</code> and
  +            <code>install</code> work for any project type.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Built-in multiple project handling</i> - Use the same goals
on a set of projects, and aggregate the
  +            results.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Improved
  +              <code>SNAPSHOT</code> handling
  +            </i> - Snapshots are now checked for updates only once per day by
  +            default - though can be configured to be once per build, on a particular interval,
or never. A command line
  +            option can force a check - making it more like updating from an SCM.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>No more properties files</i> - All plugins are now configured
from the POM (which is now called
  +            <code>pom.xml</code>).
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>No more
  +              <code>maven.xml</code>
  +            </i> - Plugins are now easier to build and integrate, and are the only
way
  +            to script your builds. (Note that additions may later be made to the POM to
allow simple things that scripting
  +            was used for, such as goal aliasing).
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>No more Jelly</i> - Plugins are primarily written in Java, though
there are providers for other scripting languages.
  +            This release includes support for Marmalade, a scripting framework that supports
an XML syntax similar to Jelly
  +            which can be used to integrate Ant tasks and has a Jelly compatibility layer.
  +          </li>
  +        </ul>
  +      </answer>
  +    </faq>
  +    <faq id="m1-or-m2">
  +      <question>Should I use Maven 2.0, or Maven 1.0?</question>
  +      <answer>
  +        <p>
  +          The answer depends very much on on your circumstances, and in particular whether
you are new to Maven or not.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          The simple answer is that we hope you'll try Maven 2.0, and use it if it works
for you. However, it is a preview
  +          release, so you can expect some features to be missing at this point and there
may be unexpected bugs.
  +          We'd hate for your first experience with Maven 2.0 to be a bad one - so if you
are embarking on a big, complicated
  +          or mission critical project - we still recommend Maven 1.0.2 as the latest stable
release.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          If you are already using Maven 1.0 - feel free to try out Maven 2.0, but it may
be better to remain on an existing
  +          version that is working for you until you need the new features and it covers
all of your needs.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          Importantly, a number of features of Maven 1.0 are not yet available in Maven
2.0 - most notably the site
  +          generation and reporting. If you need these features, we recommend staying with
Maven 1.0 at this point.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          If you do use Maven 1.0, and would like to upgrade in the future, you should
carefully consider following some
  +          of the
  +          <a href="http://maven.apache.org/using/bestpractices.html">Best Practices</a>
listed. These will make
  +          your project a lot easier to migrate in the future.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          The following are the known limitations in the current Maven 2.0 release:
  +        </p>
  +        <ul>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Error handling</i> - there are occasions where Maven 2.0 will
drop out with a long stack trace
  +            when an error has occurred. If a specific trace is not providing enough information
to find out what went
  +            wrong, please post the message to JIRA.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>No site generation</i> - The new site and documentation development
tools are much more sophisticated than
  +            the Maven 1.0 equivalents, but are not currently complete enough for a release.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Ant and scripting support</i> - while this is available, the
Ant and scripting support has not undergone
  +            rigorous testing at this point.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Availability of other plugins</i> - Maven 1.x has a large number
of plugins available - however Maven 2.0
  +            is not presently capable of executing them.
  +          </li>
  +          <li>
  +            <i>Embedding and Plugin Authoring API</i> - Maven 2.0 is designed
to be able to be embedded, and plugins can
  +            be written in Java. However, the APIs for these are subject to change so writing
code to use them may require
  +            some changes in future versions.
  +          </li>
  +        </ul>
  +      </answer>
  +    </faq>
  +    <faq id="m1-future">
  +      <question>What will happen to Maven 1.0?</question>
  +      <answer>
  +        <p>
  +          Maven 1.0.2 continues to work, and a 1.1 release is still under way. While significant
new features will not
  +          be added to the Maven 1.0 core (such as transitive dependencies), bugfixes and
support continue and the
  +          repository is still available. Features from Maven 2.0 may be included in Maven
1.1 where possible.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          An end-of-life for Maven 1.0.2 will be announced when this is decided - but there
are currently no plans for
  +          this to happen.
  +        </p>
  +      </answer>
  +    </faq>
  +    <faq id="m1-plugins">
  +      <question>Will my Maven 1.0 plugins be supported?</question>
  +      <answer>
  +        <p>
  +          Not directly. While Marmalade supports a Jelly compatibility layer - the different
POM format and goal
  +          architecture would prevent most plugins from working.
  +        </p>
  +        <p>
  +          We recommend building your Jelly plugins as thin wrappers around Java beans that
do not use Maven 1.0 API's,
  +          which will allow easy migration to Maven 2.0.
  +        </p>
  +      </answer>
  +    </faq>
     </part>
   </faqs>
   
  
  
  

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