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From Sean Owen <sro...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Sparse data & Item Similarity
Date Thu, 17 Feb 2011 07:35:38 GMT
Yeah I personally had in mind counting explicit 1 star ratings for instance.

On 17 Feb 2011 07:28, "Ted Dunning" <ted.dunning@gmail.com> wrote:
> Actually, almost all implicit negative ratings are very close to useless.
>
> The analogy would be ordering breakfast in a diner by saying all the
things
> you don't want to eat to a waitress. The waitress will shortly yearn for a
> positive rating.
>
> On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 9:28 PM, Lance Norskog <goksron@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> If I was the business, I would analyze the "put in cart but did not
>> buy" list. Negative ratings are just as useful as positive ratings.
>> Possibly this gives a +1/-1 ternary value?
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 8:07 PM, Ted Dunning <ted.dunning@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> > My experience is that there is a very small number of events that
>> indicates real engagement. Using them in the form of Boolean preferences
>> helps results. A lot.
>> >
>> > Using all of the other events that do not indicate engagement is a
total
>> waste of resources because you are simply teaching the machine about
things
>> you don't care about.
>> >
>> > Moreover there are probably some kinds of events that vastly outnumber
>> others. Events that are less than 1% of your can matter bit often not.
>> >
>> > The valuable secret sauce you will gain is which events are which.
Which
>> make your system sing and which ones just clog up the drains.
>> >
>> > Matthew wrote:
>> > users can do.. "view", "add to cart", and "buy" which I've assigned
>> > different preference values to. Perhaps it would be better to simply
>> > use boolean yes/no in my case?
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Lance Norskog
>> goksron@gmail.com
>>

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