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From Dejan Caric <dejan.ca...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Why do people want to deploy to Tomcat?
Date Tue, 12 Nov 2013 15:54:28 GMT
We're a .NET shop. We use Windows Server for both .NET code and Solr
hosting.
With Tomcat we can get everything up and running with a few mouse clicks
(it's as simple as next, next, next...) while setting up Jetty as a windows
service can be quite tricky for non-Java developers.
That's the only reason why we choose Tomcat instead of Jetty.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 3:54 PM, Henrik Ossipoff Hansen <
hoha@entertainment-trading.com> wrote:

> I agree with previous statements about the ‘example’ name is putting
> people off. Not only that though, I believe there are still some of the
> official wiki pages that directly states that the shipped Jetty is not
> appropriate for production use, which was what made us use Tomcat for a
> long while (that, and one developer had previous experience with Tomcat
> configuration).
> --
> Henrik Ossipoff Hansen
> Developer, Entertainment Trading
>
>
> On 12. nov. 2013 at 15.45.42, Hoggarth, Gil (gil.hoggarth@bl.uk<mailto://
> gil.hoggarth@bl.uk>) wrote:
>
> For me, a side-affect of 'example' is that it's just that, not appropriate
> for production. But also, there's the organisation factor beyond Solr that
> is about staff expertise - we don't have any systems that utilise jetty so
> we're unfamiliar with its configuration, issues, or oddities. Tomcat is our
> defacto container so it makes sense for us to implement Solr within Tomcat.
>
> If we ruled out these reasons, I'd still be looking for a container that:
> - was a standalone installation (i.e., outside of Solr tarball) so that it
> would be "managed" via yum (we run on RHEL). This separates any issues of
> Solr from issues of jetty, which given a current lack of jetty knowledge
> would be a helpful thing.
> - the container service could be managed via standard SysV startup
> processes. To be fair, I've implemented our own for Tomcat and could do
> this for jetty, but I'd prefer jetty included this (which would suggest it
> is more prepared for enterprise use).
> - Likewise, I assume all of jetty's configuration can be reset to use
> normal RHEL /etc/ and /var/ directories, but I'd prefer that jetty did this
> for me (to demonstrate again it's enterprise-ready status).
>
> Yes, I could do all the necessary bespoke configuration so that jetty
> follows the above reasons, but because I'd have to I question if it's ready
> for our enterprise setup (which mainly means that our Operations team will
> fight against unusual configurations).
>
> Having added all of this, I have to admit that I like the idea of using
> jetty because you guys tell me that Solr is affectively pre-configured for
> jetty. But then I'd want to know what in particular these jetty
> configurations were!
>
> BTW Very pleased that this is being discussed - the views can help me
> argue our case to use jetty if it is indeed more beneficial to do so.
>
> Gil
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sebastián Ramírez [mailto:sebastian.ramirez@senseta.com]
> Sent: 12 November 2013 13:38
> To: solr-user@lucene.apache.org
> Subject: Re: Why do people want to deploy to Tomcat?
>
> I agree with Doug, when I started I had to spend some time figuring out
> what was just an "example" and what I would have to change in a
> "production" environment... until I found that all the "example" was ready
> for production.
>
> Of course, you commonly have to change the settings, parameters, fields,
> etc. of your Solr system, but the "example" doesn't have anything that is
> not for production.
>
>
> Sebastián Ramírez
> [image: SENSETA – Capture & Analyze] <http://www.senseta.com/>
>
>
> On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 8:18 AM, Amit Aggarwal <amit.aggarwal85@gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> > Agreed with Doug
> > On 12-Nov-2013 6:46 PM, "Doug Turnbull" <
> > dturnbull@opensourceconnections.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > As an aside, I think one reason people feel compelled to deviate
> > > from the distributed jetty distribution is because the folder is named
> "example".
> > > I've had to explain to a few clients that this is a bit of a misnomer.
> > The
> > > IT dept especially sees "example" and feels uncomfortable using that
> > > as a starting point for a jetty install. I wish it was called
> > > "default" or
> > "bin"
> > > or something where its more obviously the default jetty distribution
> > > of Solr.
> > >
> > >
> > > On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 7:06 AM, Roland Everaert
> > > <reveatwork@gmail.com
> > > >wrote:
> > >
> > > > In my case, the first time I had to deploy and configure solr on
> > > > tomcat (and jboss) it was a requirement to reuse as much as
> > > > possible the application/web server already in place. The next
> > > > deployment I also use tomcat, because I was used to deploy on
> > > > tomcat and I don't know jetty
> > at
> > > > all.
> > > >
> > > > I could ask the same question with regard to jetty. Why
> > > > use/bundle(/ if
> > > not
> > > > recommend) jetty with solr over other webserver solutions?
> > > >
> > > > Regards,
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Roland Everaert.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 12:33 PM, Alvaro Cabrerizo
> > > > <toporniz@gmail.com
> > > > >wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > In my case, the selection of the servlet container has never
> > > > > been a
> > > hard
> > > > > requirement. I mean, some customers provide us a virtual machine
> > > > configured
> > > > > with java/tomcat , others have a tomcat installed and want to
> > > > > share
> > it
> > > > with
> > > > > solr, others prefer jetty because their sysadmins are used to
> > configure
> > > > > it... At least in the projects I've been working in, the
> > > > > selection
> > of
> > > > the
> > > > > servlet engine has not been a key factor in the project success.
> > > > >
> > > > > Regards.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Andre Bois-Crettez
> > > > > <andre.bois@kelkoo.com>wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > We are using Solr running on Tomcat.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I think the top reasons for us are :
> > > > > > - we already have nagios monitoring plugins for tomcat that
> > > > > > trace queries ok/error, http codes / response time etc in
> > > > > > access logs,
> > > number
> > > > > > of threads, jvm memory usage etc
> > > > > > - start, stop, watchdogs, logs : we also use our standard
> > > > > > tools
> > for
> > > > that
> > > > > > - what about security filters ? Is that possible with jetty
?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > André
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > On 11/12/2013 04:54 AM, Alexandre Rafalovitch wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > >> Hello,
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> I keep seeing here and on Stack Overflow people trying to
> > > > > >> deploy
> > > Solr
> > > > to
> > > > > >> Tomcat. We don't usually ask why, just help when where we
can.
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> But the question happens often enough that I am curious.
What
> > > > > >> is
> > the
> > > > > >> actual
> > > > > >> business case. Is that because Tomcat is well known? Is
it
> > > > > >> because
> > > > other
> > > > > >> apps are running under Tomcat and it is ops' requirement?
Is
> > > > > >> it
> > > > because
> > > > > >> Tomcat gives something - to Solr - that Jetty does not?
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> It might be useful to know. Especially, since Solr team
is
> > > considering
> > > > > >> making the server part into a black box component. What
use
> > > > > >> cases
> > > will
> > > > > >> that
> > > > > >> break?
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> So, if somebody runs Solr under Tomcat (or needed to and
gave
> > > > > >> up),
> > > > let's
> > > > > >> use this thread to collect this knowledge.
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> Regards,
> > > > > >> Alex.
> > > > > >> Personal website: http://www.outerthoughts.com/
> > > > > >> LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandrerafalovitch
> > > > > >> - Time is the quality of nature that keeps events from
> > > > > >> happening
> > all
> > > > at
> > > > > >> once. Lately, it doesn't seem to be working. (Anonymous
-
> > > > > >> via
> > GTD
> > > > > book)
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> --
> > > > > >> André Bois-Crettez
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> Software Architect
> > > > > >> Search Developer
> > > > > >> http://www.kelkoo.com/
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Kelkoo SAS
> > > > > > Société par Actions Simplifiée Au capital de € 4.168.964,30
> > > > > > Siège social : 8, rue du Sentier 75002 Paris
> > > > > > 425 093 069 RCS Paris
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Ce message et les pièces jointes sont confidentiels et établis
> > > > > > à l'attention exclusive de leurs destinataires. Si vous n'êtes
> > > > > > pas le destinataire de ce message, merci de le détruire et
> > > > > > d'en avertir l'expéditeur.
> > > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Doug Turnbull
> > > Search & Big Data Architect
> > > OpenSource Connections <http://o19s.com>
> > >
> >
>
> --
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