lucene-solr-user mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From Thorsten Scherler <thors...@apache.org>
Subject Re: Seeking FAQs
Date Mon, 08 Jan 2007 11:41:47 GMT
On Sat, 2007-01-06 at 10:25 -0500, David Halsted wrote:
> I wonder what would happen if we used a clustering engine like Carrot
> to categorize either the e-mails in the archive or the results of
> searches against them?  Perhaps we'd find some candidates for the FAQ
> that way.

Not sure about tools but IMO this works fine done by user/committer. I
think the one that asked the question on the list is a likely candidate
to add an entry in the faq.

The typical scenario should be:
user asks question -> user get answers from community -> user adds FAQ
entry with the solution that worked for her

This way the one asking the question can give a little something back to
the community.

If you follow the lists a bit one can identify some faq's right away:
- Searching multiple indeces 
- Clustering solr (custom scorer, highlighter, ...)
- ...


> 
> Dave
> 
> On 1/5/07, Chris Hostetter <hossman_lucene@fucit.org> wrote:
> >
> > Hey everybody,
> >
> > I was lookin at the FAQ today, and I realized it hasn't really changed
> > much in the past year ... in fact, only two people besides myself have
> > added questions (thanks Thorsten and Darren) in the entire time Solr
> > has been in incubation -- which is not to say that Erik and Respaldo's
> > efforts to fix my typo's aren't equally helpful :)
> >
> >         http://wiki.apache.org/solr/FAQ
> >
> > In my experience, FAQs are one of the few pieces of documentation that are
> > really hard for developers to write, because we are so use to dealing with
> > the systems we work on, we don't allways notice when a question has been
> > asked more then once or twice (unless it gets asked over and over and
> > *over*).  The best source of FAQ updates tend to come from users who have
> > a question, and either find the answer in the mailing list archives, or
> > notice the same question asked by someone else later.
> >

Yes, I totally agree. Sometimes the content for the solution can be
found in the wiki. One would just need to link to the wiki page from the
FAQ.

> > So If there are any "gotchas" you remember having when you first started
> > using Solr, or questions you've noticed asked more then once please feel
> > free to add them to the wiki.  The Convention is to only add a question if
> > you're also adding an answer, but even if you don't think a satisfactory
> > answer has ever been given, or you're not sure how to best summarize
> > multiple answers given in the past, just including links to
> > instances in the mailing list archives where the question was asked is
> > helpful -- both in the short term as pointers for people looking for help,
> > and in the long term as starter points for people who want to flesh out a
> > detailed answer.
> >

In the long run the content of the wiki that has proved solution should
IMO go directly in the official documentation. 

salu2
-- 
thorsten

"Together we stand, divided we fall!" 
Hey you (Pink Floyd)



Mime
View raw message