lucene-general mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From André Warnier ...@ice-sa.com>
Subject Re: [spatial] Cartesian "Tiers" nomenclature
Date Mon, 28 Dec 2009 19:43:54 GMT
Grant Ingersoll wrote:
> On Dec 28, 2009, at 1:00 PM, Ryan McKinley wrote:
> 
>>>>> Do you think it is worth a name change?  This is about to get baked into
>>>>> Solr and I would really prefer we choose names that the rest of the world
>>>>> seems to understand.
>>>> If it hasn't been baked in yet, then +1.  I do agree that it's important
to
>>>> use names that are already present in the hivemind rather than invent new
>>>> ones.  Been there, done that, got sick of having to explain myself, went
back
>>>> to popular names...
>>>>
>>> It's semi-baked into Lucene already and people familiar w/ LocalLucene and LocalSolr.
>>>
>> Although it is 'semi-baked', the spatial contrib in 2.9 is clearly marked experimental
and subject to change.  Also, the tier stuff in 2.9 does not have enough substance to stand
on its own -- any change will break APIs.
>>
>> If folks think "tile" (or "grid") make more sense, now is an easy time to change.
>>
>> In my book it seems better to use the most common terms, but I can also see the advantage
to knowing that if people are talking about "cartesian tiers" then they are referring to lucene.
 (That can also be useful to distinguish spatial lucene/solr from "LocalLucene/Solr")
>>
>> I'm +1 for "Tile"
> 
> Ditto.  I'm +1 on tiles.

It's not so often that I find on this forum a topic to which I can 
contribute.

So as a total outsider, french-speaking, barely acquainted with Lucene 
and Solr, and who'se closest claim to knowledge in the matter is to have 
been an interested spectator at the Lucene/Solr presentations at 
ApacheCON Europe 2009, I vote
- for "tiles" or "grid", because they are terms I would search for in 
association with (geo)spatial stuff, while I would never think of tiers
- for Cartesian because it comes from René Descartes, an icon of 
french-speaking philosophy and rationalism, and because it intuitively 
connects to the concept of "coordinates"



Mime
View raw message