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From Grant Ingersoll <gsing...@apache.org>
Subject Re: discussion about release frequency.
Date Mon, 20 Sep 2010 12:58:27 GMT

On Sep 20, 2010, at 8:44 AM, Robert Muir wrote:

> 
> 
> On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 8:23 AM, Grant Ingersoll <gsingers@apache.org> wrote:
> At any rate, the big problem w/ Maven and Lucene is not that generate-maven-artifacts
doesn't work, it's that the POM templates aren't kept in sync.  However, I think we now have
a solution for that thanks to Steve and Robert's work to make it easier to bring Lucene into
IntelliJ.  In other words, that process does much of what is needed for Maven, so it should
be relatively straightforward to have it automatically generate the templates, too.  In fact,
it would be just as easy for that project to simply produce POM files (which are well understood
and have a published spec) instead of creating the IntelliJ project files, which are not well
understood and not publicly spec'd and subject to change w/ every release and simply have
IntelliJ suck in the POM file since IntelliJ supports that very, very well.
> 
> 
> So are you saying, instead of generating IntelliJ configuration, we generate poms, and
then we have a route, via maven, for users to automatically set up their IntelliJ (and also
eclipse?) IDEs?
> 
> If so this sounds great to me. Because it would be nice to make the IDE configuration
easier, not just for IntelliJ.

Yes.  I know for a fact IntelliJ can read the POMs.  I use it all the time.  Go check out
Mahout and point IntelliJ at it's POM.  You will be up and compiling  (in your IDE) in less
than 2 minutes give or take.  I imagine Eclipse has similar support.

>  
> Then, to automatically test Maven, we simply need to do a few things:
> 1. Generate the templates
> 2. Build the Maven artifacts and "install" them (this is a Maven concept that copies
them to your local repository, usually in ~/.mvn/repository, but it can be in other places
and it should be clean)
> 3. Generate a "test" pom that includes, as dependencies all the Lucene Maven artifacts
and maybe even compiles a small source tree with it
> 
> 
> +1. this would resolve all my concerns about maven, because we have a way to test that
it stands a chance of working *before release*.
> 
> I hope you don't think I am picking on maven here, I'm equally disturbed about the demo
application, and i think it should have a basic unit test too that indexes stuff, fires itself
up in jetty, and runs a search.

I totally understand it.  I'm not some Maven fanboi (especially as the person who used it
to put together the Mahout release, initially).  I know it's warts, believe me, as I have
lived the pain.  That being said, for _most_ users (i.e. not necessarily us committers) who
are simply using Lucene/Solr within a much broader environment of dependencies, having the
JARs available in the Maven repo w/ correct POM files is a very good thing that makes it so
much easier for them to do their day to day work and I would hate to see that go away, especially
since it is something we have supported for quite some time, albeit with varying levels of
success.

> 
> Like maven, i know some people don't necessarily like the demo, but as long as we are
going to ship it, I want tests so that we dont find its completely nonfunctional after the
release. Unlike maven, i think i stand a chance of actually being able to write the test for
this one though.

I've been wanting to do those Maven tests for a while now, but simply can't find the time
relative to my other priorities.  I guess if the community is saying that if someone doesn't
step up, it's going to be dropped, I'll step up.  I can likely commit to it before the next
release. 

-Grant
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