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From ctarg...@apache.org
Subject lucene-solr:jira/solr-10290: SOLR-10290: content conversion, letter A
Date Fri, 05 May 2017 17:02:49 GMT
Repository: lucene-solr
Updated Branches:
  refs/heads/jira/solr-10290 4dca53bf5 -> adf8959db


SOLR-10290: content conversion, letter A


Project: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/repo
Commit: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/commit/adf8959d
Tree: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/tree/adf8959d
Diff: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/diff/adf8959d

Branch: refs/heads/jira/solr-10290
Commit: adf8959db733f516f81b5cb1b43e0b13218c4f53
Parents: 4dca53b
Author: Cassandra Targett <ctargett@apache.org>
Authored: Fri May 5 12:01:52 2017 -0500
Committer: Cassandra Targett <ctargett@apache.org>
Committed: Fri May 5 12:01:52 2017 -0500

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc   | 12 ++--
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc      | 12 ++--
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc      |  2 +-
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc   | 60 ++++++++------------
 ...adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc | 52 +++++++----------
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc    |  2 -
 solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc          |  6 +-
 ...uthentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc | 33 +++++------
 8 files changed, 74 insertions(+), 105 deletions(-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------


http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc
index 8943b9e..b87d091 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-quick-overview.adoc
@@ -6,17 +6,17 @@ Having had some fun with Solr, you will now learn about all the cool things
it c
 
 Here is a example of how Solr might be integrated into an application:
 
+.Solr integration with applications
 image::images/a-quick-overview/sample-client-app-arch.png[image,width=500,height=379]
 
-
-_In the scenario above, Solr runs along side other server applications. For example, an online
store application would provide a user interface, a shopping cart, and a way to make purchases
for end users; while an inventory management application would allow store employees to edit
product information. The product metadata would be kept in some kind of database, as well
as in Solr._
+In the scenario above, Solr runs along side other server applications. For example, an online
store application would provide a user interface, a shopping cart, and a way to make purchases
for end users; while an inventory management application would allow store employees to edit
product information. The product metadata would be kept in some kind of database, as well
as in Solr.
 
 Solr makes it easy to add the capability to search through the online store through the following
steps:
 
-1.  Define a __schema__. The schema tells Solr about the contents of documents it will be
indexing. In the online store example, the schema would define fields for the product name,
description, price, manufacturer, and so on. Solr's schema is powerful and flexible and allows
you to tailor Solr's behavior to your application. See <<documents-fields-and-schema-design.adoc#documents-fields-and-schema-design,Documents,
Fields, and Schema Design>> for all the details.
-2.  Deploy Solr.
-3.  Feed Solr documents for which your users will search.
-4.  Expose search functionality in your application.
+. Define a _schema_. The schema tells Solr about the contents of documents it will be indexing.
In the online store example, the schema would define fields for the product name, description,
price, manufacturer, and so on. Solr's schema is powerful and flexible and allows you to tailor
Solr's behavior to your application. See <<documents-fields-and-schema-design.adoc#documents-fields-and-schema-design,Documents,
Fields, and Schema Design>> for all the details.
+. Deploy Solr.
+. Feed Solr documents for which your users will search.
+. Expose search functionality in your application.
 
 Because Solr is based on open standards, it is highly extensible. Solr queries are RESTful,
which means, in essence, that a query is a simple HTTP request URL and the response is a structured
document: mainly XML, but it could also be JSON, CSV, or some other format. This means that
a wide variety of clients will be able to use Solr, from other web applications to browser
clients, rich client applications, and mobile devices. Any platform capable of HTTP can talk
to Solr. See <<client-apis.adoc#client-apis,Client APIs>> for details on client
APIs.
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc
index 39c90c8..bca47d9 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/a-step-closer.adoc
@@ -8,9 +8,8 @@ When Solr runs in an application server, it needs access to a home directory.
Th
 
 The crucial parts of the Solr home directory are shown in these examples:
 
-*Standalone Mode*
-
-[source,java]
+.Standalone Mode
+[source,bash]
 ----
 <solr-home-directory>/
    solr.xml
@@ -28,9 +27,8 @@ The crucial parts of the Solr home directory are shown in these examples:
       data/
 ----
 
-*SolrCloud Mode*
-
-[source,java]
+.SolrCloud Mode
+[source,bash]
 ----
 <solr-home-directory>/
    solr.xml
@@ -53,4 +51,4 @@ You may see other files, but the main ones you need to know are:
 
 Note that the SolrCloud example does not include a `conf` directory for each Solr Core (so
there is no `solrconfig.xml` or Schema file). This is because the configuration files usually
found in the `conf` directory are stored in ZooKeeper so they can be propagated across the
cluster.
 
-If you are using SolrCloud with the embedded ZooKeeper instance, you may also see `zoo.cfg`
and `zoo.data `which are ZooKeeper configuration and data files. However, if you are running
your own ZooKeeper ensemble, you would supply your own ZooKeeper configuration file when you
start it and the copies in Solr would be unused. For more information about ZooKeeper and
SolrCloud, see the section <<solrcloud.adoc#solrcloud,SolrCloud>>.
+If you are using SolrCloud with the embedded ZooKeeper instance, you may also see `zoo.cfg`
and `zoo.data` which are ZooKeeper configuration and data files. However, if you are running
your own ZooKeeper ensemble, you would supply your own ZooKeeper configuration file when you
start it and the copies in Solr would be unused. For more information about ZooKeeper and
SolrCloud, see the section <<solrcloud.adoc#solrcloud,SolrCloud>>.

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc
index 9445c43..84e3b95 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-filters.adoc
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Because filters consume one `TokenStream` and produce a new `TokenStream`,
they
 
 This example starts with Solr's standard tokenizer, which breaks the field's text into tokens.
Those tokens then pass through Solr's standard filter, which removes dots from acronyms, and
performs a few other common operations. All the tokens are then set to lowercase, which will
facilitate case-insensitive matching at query time.
 
-The last filter in the above example is a stemmer filter that uses the Porter stemming algorithm.
A stemmer is basically a set of mapping rules that maps the various forms of a word back to
the base, or __stem__, word from which they derive. For example, in English the words "hugs",
"hugging" and "hugged" are all forms of the stem word "hug". The stemmer will replace all
of these terms with "hug", which is what will be indexed. This means that a query for "hug"
will match the term "hugged", but not "huge".
+The last filter in the above example is a stemmer filter that uses the Porter stemming algorithm.
A stemmer is basically a set of mapping rules that maps the various forms of a word back to
the base, or _stem_, word from which they derive. For example, in English the words "hugs",
"hugging" and "hugged" are all forms of the stem word "hug". The stemmer will replace all
of these terms with "hug", which is what will be indexed. This means that a query for "hug"
will match the term "hugged", but not "huge".
 
 Conversely, applying a stemmer to your query terms will allow queries containing non stem
terms, like "hugging", to match documents with different variations of the same stem word,
such as "hugged". This works because both the indexer and the query will map to the same stem
("hug").
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc
index 6771e3d..82137b0 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/about-this-guide.adoc
@@ -11,55 +11,45 @@ The material as presented assumes that you are familiar with some basic
search c
 [[AboutThisGuide-SpecialInlineNotes]]
 === Special Inline Notes
 
-Special notes are included throughout these pages.
+Special notes are included throughout these pages. There are several types of notes:
 
-// TODO: This table has cells that won't work with PDF: https://github.com/ctargett/refguide-asciidoc-poc/issues/13
+Information blocks::
++
+NOTE: These provide additional information that's useful for you to know.
 
-[width="100%",cols="50%,50%",options="header",]
-|===
-|Note Type |Look & Description
-|*Information* a|
-[NOTE]
-====
+Important::
++
+IMPORTANT: These provide information that is critical for you to know.
 
-Notes with a blue background are used for information that is important for you to know.
+Tip::
++
+TIP: These provide helpful tips.
 
-====
+Caution::
++
+CAUTION: These provide details on scenarios or configurations you should be careful with.
 
-|*Notes* a|
-[IMPORTANT]
-====
+Warning::
++
+WARNING: These are meant to warn you from a possibly dangerous change or action.
 
-Yellow notes are further clarifications of important points to keep in mind while using Solr.
 
-====
-
-|*Tip* a|
-[TIP]
-====
-
-Notes with a green background are Helpful Tips.
-
-====
-
-|*Warning* a|
-[WARNING]
-====
+[[AboutThisGuide-HostsandPortExamples]]
+=== Hosts and Port Examples
 
-Notes with a red background are warning messages.
+The default port when running Solr is 8983. The samples, URLs and screenshots in this guide
may show different ports, because the port number that Solr uses is configurable. If you have
not customized your installation of Solr, please make sure that you use port 8983 when following
the examples, or configure your own installation to use the port numbers shown in the examples.
For information about configuring port numbers, see the section <<managing-solr.adoc#managing-solr,Managing
Solr>>.
 
-====
+Similarly, URL examples use 'localhost' throughout; if you are accessing Solr from a location
remote to the server hosting Solr, replace 'localhost' with the proper domain or IP where
Solr is running.
 
-|===
+For example, we might provide a sample query like:
 
-[[AboutThisGuide-HostsandPortExamples]]
-=== Hosts and Port Examples
+`\http://localhost:8983/solr/gettingstarted/select?q=brown+cow`
 
-The default port when running Solr is 8983. The samples, URLs and screenshots in this guide
may show different ports, because the port number that Solr uses is configurable. If you have
not customized your installation of Solr, please make sure that you use port 8983 when following
the examples, or configure your own installation to use the port numbers shown in the examples.
For information about configuring port numbers, see <<managing-solr.adoc#managing-solr,Managing
Solr>>.
+There are several items in this URL you might need to change locally. First, if your server
is running at "www.example.com", you'll replace "localhost" with the proper domain. If you
aren't using port 8983, you'll replace that also. Finally, you'll want to replace "gettingstarted"
(the collection or core name) with the proper one in use in your implementation. The URL would
then become:
 
-Similarly, URL examples use 'localhost' throughout; if you are accessing Solr from a location
remote to the server hosting Solr, replace 'localhost' with the proper domain or IP where
Solr is running.
+`\http://www.example.com/solr/mycollection/select?q=brown+cow`
 
 [[AboutThisGuide-Paths]]
 === Paths
 
-Path information is given relative to `solr.home`, which is the location under the main Solr
installation where Solr's collections and their `conf` and `data` directories are stored.
When running the various examples mentioned through out this tutorial (i.e., `bin/solr -e
techproducts`) the `solr.home` will be a sub directory of `example/` created for you automatically.
+Path information is given relative to `solr.home`, which is the location under the main Solr
installation where Solr's collections and their `conf` and `data` directories are stored.
When running the various examples mentioned through out this tutorial (i.e., `bin/solr -e
techproducts`) the `solr.home` will be a sub-directory of `example/` created for you automatically.

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc
index 008b5e7..4c6a04d 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.adoc
@@ -2,16 +2,16 @@
 :page-shortname: adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode
 :page-permalink: adding-custom-plugins-in-solrcloud-mode.html
 
+In SolrCloud mode, custom plugins need to be shared across all nodes of the cluster.
+
 When running Solr in SolrCloud mode and you want to use custom code (such as custom analyzers,
tokenizers, query parsers, and other plugins), it can be cumbersome to add jars to the classpath
on all nodes in your cluster. Using the <<blob-store-api.adoc#blob-store-api,Blob Store
API>> and special commands with the <<config-api.adoc#config-api,Config API>>,
you can upload jars to a special system-level collection and dynamically load plugins from
them at runtime with out needing to restart any nodes.
 
 .This Feature is Disabled By Default
 [IMPORTANT]
 ====
-
 In addition to requiring that Solr by running in <<solrcloud.adoc#solrcloud,SolrCloud>>
mode, this feature is also disabled by default unless all Solr nodes are run with the `-Denable.runtime.lib=true`
option on startup.
 
-Before enabling this feature, users should carefully consider the issues discussed in the
<<AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-SecuringRuntimeLibraries,Securing Runtime Libraries>>
section below.
-
+Before enabling this feature, users should carefully consider the issues discussed in the
<<Securing Runtime Libraries>> section below.
 ====
 
 [[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-UploadingJarFiles]]
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ curl http://localhost:8983/solr/techproducts/config -H 'Content-type:application
    "add-runtimelib": { "name":"jarblobname", "version":2 },
    "update-runtimelib": { "name":"jarblobname", "version":3 },
    "delete-runtimelib": "jarblobname"
-}' 
+}'
 ----
 
 The name to use is the name of the blob that you specified when you uploaded your jar to
the blob store. You should also include the version of the jar found in the blob store that
you want to use. These details are added to `configoverlay.json`.
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ curl http://localhost:8983/solr/techproducts/config -H 'Content-type:application
     "name": "nvl",
     "runtimeLib": true,
     "class": "solr.org.apache.solr.search.function.NvlValueSourceParser,
-    "nvlFloatValue": 0.0 }  
+    "nvlFloatValue": 0.0 }
 }'
 ----
 
@@ -65,9 +65,7 @@ A drawback of this feature is that it could be used to load malicious executable
 
 The following steps will allow you enable security for this feature. The instructions assume
you have started all your Solr nodes with the `-Denable.runtime.lib=true`.
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step1:GenerateanRSAPrivateKey
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step1_GenerateanRSAPrivateKey]]
+[[Step1_GenerateanRSAPrivateKey]]
 === Step 1: Generate an RSA Private Key
 
 The first step is to generate an RSA private key. The example below uses a 512-bit key, but
you should use the strength appropriate to your needs.
@@ -77,9 +75,7 @@ The first step is to generate an RSA private key. The example below uses
a 512-b
 $ openssl genrsa -out priv_key.pem 512
 ----
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step2:OutputthePublicKey
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step2_OutputthePublicKey]]
+[[Step2_OutputthePublicKey]]
 === Step 2: Output the Public Key
 
 The public portion of the key should be output in DER format so Java can read it.
@@ -89,14 +85,14 @@ The public portion of the key should be output in DER format so Java can
read it
 $ openssl rsa -in priv_key.pem -pubout -outform DER -out pub_key.der
 ----
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step3:LoadtheKeytoZooKeeper
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step3_LoadtheKeytoZooKeeper]]
+[[Step3_LoadtheKeytoZooKeeper]]
 === Step 3: Load the Key to ZooKeeper
 
-The .der files that are output from Step 2 should then be loaded to ZooKeeper under a node
`/keys/exe` so they are available throughout every node. You can load any number of public
keys to that node and all are valid. If a key is removed from the directory, the signatures
of that key will cease to be valid. So, before removing the a key, make sure to update your
runtime library configurations with valid signatures with the `update-runtimelib` command.
+The `.der` files that are output from Step 2 should then be loaded to ZooKeeper under a node
`/keys/exe` so they are available throughout every node. You can load any number of public
keys to that node and all are valid. If a key is removed from the directory, the signatures
of that key will cease to be valid. So, before removing the a key, make sure to update your
runtime library configurations with valid signatures with the `update-runtimelib` command.
 
-At the current time, you can only use the ZooKeeper `zkCli.sh` (or `zkCli.cmd` on Windows)
script to issue these commands (the Solr version has the same name, but is not the same).
If you are running the embedded ZooKeeper that is included with Solr, you *do not* have this
script already; in order to use it, you will need to download a copy of ZooKeeper v3.4.6 from
http://zookeeper.apache.org/. Don't worry about configuring the download, you're just trying
to get the command line utility script. When you start the script, you will connect to the
embedded ZooKeeper. If you have your own ZooKeeper ensemble running already, you can find
the script in `$ZK_INSTALL/bin/zkCli.sh` (or `zkCli.cmd` if you are using Windows).
+At the current time, you can only use the ZooKeeper `zkCli.sh` (or `zkCli.cmd` on Windows)
script to issue these commands (the Solr version has the same name, but is not the same).
If you have your own ZooKeeper ensemble running already, you can find the script in `$ZK_INSTALL/bin/zkCli.sh`
(or `zkCli.cmd` if you are using Windows).
+
+NOTE: If you are running the embedded ZooKeeper that is included with Solr, you *do not*
have this script already; in order to use it, you will need to download a copy of ZooKeeper
v3.4.6 from http://zookeeper.apache.org/. Don't worry about configuring the download, you're
just trying to get the command line utility script. When you start the script, you will connect
to the embedded ZooKeeper.
 
 To load the keys, you will need to connect to ZooKeeper with `zkCli.sh`, create the directories,
and then create the key file, as in the following example.
 
@@ -105,12 +101,12 @@ To load the keys, you will need to connect to ZooKeeper with `zkCli.sh`,
create
 # Connect to ZooKeeper
 # Replace the server location below with the correct ZooKeeper connect string for your installation.
 $ .bin/zkCli.sh -server localhost:9983
- 
+
 # After connection, you will interact with the ZK prompt.
 # Create the directories
 [zk: localhost:9983(CONNECTED) 5] create /keys
 [zk: localhost:9983(CONNECTED) 5] create /keys/exe
- 
+
 # Now create the public key file in ZooKeeper
 # The second path is the path to the .der file on your local machine
 [zk: localhost:9983(CONNECTED) 5] create /keys/exe/pub_key.der /myLocal/pathTo/pub_key.der
@@ -118,38 +114,32 @@ $ .bin/zkCli.sh -server localhost:9983
 
 After this, any attempt to load a jar will fail. All your jars must be signed with one of
your private keys for Solr to trust it. The process to sign your jars and use the signature
is outlined in Steps 4-6.
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step4:SignthejarFile
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step4_SignthejarFile]]
+[[Step4_SignthejarFile]]
 === Step 4: Sign the jar File
 
 Next you need to sign the sha1 digest of your jar file and get the base64 string.
 
 [source,bash]
 ----
-$ openssl dgst -sha1 -sign priv_key.pem myjar.jar | openssl enc -base64 
+$ openssl dgst -sha1 -sign priv_key.pem myjar.jar | openssl enc -base64
 ----
 
 The output of this step will be a string that you will need to add the jar to your classpath
in Step 6 below.
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step5:LoadthejartotheBlobStore
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step5_LoadthejartotheBlobStore]]
+[[Step5_LoadthejartotheBlobStore]]
 === Step 5: Load the jar to the Blob Store
 
 Load your jar to the Blob store, using the <<blob-store-api.adoc#blob-store-api,Blob
Store API>>. This step does not require a signature; you will need the signature in
Step 6 to add it to your classpath.
 
 [source,bash]
 ----
-curl -X POST -H 'Content-Type: application/octet-stream' --data-binary @{filename} 
+curl -X POST -H 'Content-Type: application/octet-stream' --data-binary @{filename}
 http://localhost:8983/solr/.system/blob/{blobname}
 ----
 
 The blob name that you give the jar file in this step will be used as the name in the next
step.
 
-// OLD_CONFLUENCE_ID: AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step6:AddthejartotheClasspath
-
-[[AddingCustomPluginsinSolrCloudMode-Step6_AddthejartotheClasspath]]
+[[Step6_AddthejartotheClasspath]]
 === Step 6: Add the jar to the Classpath
 
 Finally, add the jar to the classpath using the Config API as detailed above. In this step,
you will need to provide the signature of the jar that you got in Step 4.
@@ -158,9 +148,9 @@ Finally, add the jar to the classpath using the Config API as detailed
above. In
 ----
 curl http://localhost:8983/solr/techproducts/config -H 'Content-type:application/json'  -d
'{
   "add-runtimelib": {
-    "name":"blobname", 
+    "name":"blobname",
     "version":2,
     "sig":"mW1Gwtz2QazjfVdrLFHfbGwcr8xzFYgUOLu68LHqWRDvLG0uLcy1McQ+AzVmeZFBf1yLPDEHBWJb5KXr8bdbHN/
-           PYgUB1nsr9pk4EFyD9KfJ8TqeH/ijQ9waa/vjqyiKEI9U550EtSzruLVZ32wJ7smvV0fj2YYhrUaaPzOn9g0="
} 
+           PYgUB1nsr9pk4EFyD9KfJ8TqeH/ijQ9waa/vjqyiKEI9U550EtSzruLVZ32wJ7smvV0fj2YYhrUaaPzOn9g0="
}
 }'
 ----

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc
index 384c027..2910206 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analysis-screen.adoc
@@ -8,12 +8,10 @@ Enter content in one or both boxes at the top of the screen, and then choose
the
 
 image::images/analysis-screen/analysis_normal.png[image,height=400]
 
-
 If you click the *Verbose Output* check box, you see more information, including more details
on the transformations to the input (such as, convert to lower case, strip extra characters,
etc.) including the raw bytes, type and detailed position information at each stage. The information
displayed will vary depending on the settings of the field or field type. Each step of the
process is displayed in a separate section, with an abbreviation for the tokenizer or filter
that is applied in that step. Hover or click on the abbreviation, and you'll see the name
and path of the tokenizer or filter.
 
 image::images/analysis-screen/analysis_verbose.png[image,height=400]
 
-
 In the example screenshot above, several transformations are applied to the input "Running
is a sport." The words "is" and "a" have been removed and the word "running" has been changed
to its basic form, "run". This is because we are using the field type `text_en` in this scenario,
which is configured to remove stop words (small words that usually do not provide a great
deal of context) and "stem" terms when possible to find more possible matches (this is particularly
helpful with plural forms of words). If you click the question mark next to the *Analyze Fieldname/Field
Type* pull-down menu, the <<schema-browser-screen.adoc#schema-browser-screen,Schema
Browser window>> will open, showing you the settings for the field specified.
 
 The section <<understanding-analyzers-tokenizers-and-filters.adoc#understanding-analyzers-tokenizers-and-filters,Understanding
Analyzers, Tokenizers, and Filters>> describes in detail what each option is and how
it may transform your data and the section <<running-your-analyzer.adoc#running-your-analyzer,Running
Your Analyzer>> has specific examples for using the Analysis screen.

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc
index 5c05962..6753737 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/analyzers.adoc
@@ -2,7 +2,9 @@
 :page-shortname: analyzers
 :page-permalink: analyzers.html
 
-An analyzer examines the text of fields and generates a token stream. Analyzers are specified
as a child of the `<fieldType>` element in the `schema.xml` configuration file (in the
same `conf/` directory as `solrconfig.xml`).
+An analyzer examines the text of fields and generates a token stream.
+
+Analyzers are specified as a child of the `<fieldType>` element in the `schema.xml`
configuration file (in the same `conf/` directory as `solrconfig.xml`).
 
 In normal usage, only fields of type `solr.TextField` will specify an analyzer. The simplest
way to configure an analyzer is with a single `<analyzer>` element whose class attribute
is a fully qualified Java class name. The named class must derive from `org.apache.lucene.analysis.Analyzer`.
For example:
 
@@ -39,9 +41,7 @@ In this case, no Analyzer class was specified on the `<analyzer>`
element. Rathe
 .Field Values versus Indexed Terms
 [IMPORTANT]
 ====
-
 The output of an Analyzer affects the _terms_ indexed in a given field (and the terms used
when parsing queries against those fields) but it has no impact on the _stored_ value for
the fields. For example: an analyzer might split "Brown Cow" into two indexed terms "brown"
and "cow", but the stored value will still be a single String: "Brown Cow"
-
 ====
 
 [[Analyzers-AnalysisPhases]]

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/lucene-solr/blob/adf8959d/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/authentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/authentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/authentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc
index 585360a..7afc2b7 100644
--- a/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/authentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc
+++ b/solr/solr-ref-guide/src/authentication-and-authorization-plugins.adoc
@@ -3,7 +3,9 @@
 :page-permalink: authentication-and-authorization-plugins.html
 :page-children: basic-authentication-plugin, hadoop-authentication-plugin, kerberos-authentication-plugin,
rule-based-authorization-plugin
 
-Solr has security frameworks for supporting authentication and authorization of users. This
allows for verifying a user's identity and for restricting access to resources in a Solr cluster.
Solr includes some plugins out of the box, and additional plugins can be developed using the
authentication and authorization frameworks described below.
+Solr has security frameworks for supporting authentication and authorization of users. This
allows for verifying a user's identity and for restricting access to resources in a Solr cluster.
+
+Solr includes some plugins out of the box, and additional plugins can be developed using
the authentication and authorization frameworks described below.
 
 All authentication and authorization plugins can work with Solr whether they are running
in SolrCloud mode or standalone mode. All authentication and authorization configuration,
including users and permission rules, are stored in a file named `security.json`. When using
Solr in standalone mode, this file must be in the `$SOLR_HOME` directory (usually `server/solr`).
When using SolrCloud, this file must be located in ZooKeeper.
 
@@ -14,8 +16,7 @@ The following section describes how to enable plugins with `security.json`
and p
 
 All of the information required to initialize either type of security plugin is stored in
a `security.json` file. This file contains 2 sections, one each for authentication and authorization.
 
-*security.json*
-
+.Sample security.json
 [source,java]
 ----
 {
@@ -53,13 +54,13 @@ Here is a more detailed `security.json` example. In this, the Basic authenticati
 == Using security.json with Solr
 
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-InSolrCloudmode]]
-=== In SolrCloud mode
+=== In SolrCloud Mode
 
 While configuring Solr to use an authentication or authorization plugin, you will need to
upload a `security.json` file to ZooKeeper. The following command writes the file as it uploads
it - you could also upload a file that you have already created locally.
 
 [source,bash]
 ----
-> server/scripts/cloud-scripts/zkcli.sh -zkhost localhost:2181 -cmd put /security.json

+>server/scripts/cloud-scripts/zkcli.sh -zkhost localhost:2181 -cmd put /security.json
   '{"authentication": {"class": "org.apache.solr.security.KerberosPlugin"}}'
 ----
 
@@ -69,9 +70,7 @@ This example also defines `security.json` on the command line, but you can
also
 
 [WARNING]
 ====
-
 Depending on the authentication and authorization plugin that you use, you may have user
information stored in `security.json`. If so, we highly recommend that you implement access
control in your ZooKeeper nodes. Information about how to enable this is available in the
section <<zookeeper-access-control.adoc#zookeeper-access-control,ZooKeeper Access Control>>.
-
 ====
 
 Once `security.json` has been uploaded to ZooKeeper, you should use the appropriate APIs
for the plugins you're using to update it. You can edit it manually, but you must take care
to remove any version data so it will be properly updated across all ZooKeeper nodes. The
version data is found at the end of the `security.json` file, and will appear as the letter
"v" followed by a number, such as `{"v":138}`.
@@ -92,16 +91,14 @@ Authentication plugins help in securing the endpoints of Solr by authenticating
 
 An authentication plugin consists of two parts:
 
-1.  Server-side component, which intercepts and authenticates incoming requests to Solr using
a mechanism defined in the plugin, such as Kerberos, Basic Auth or others.
-2.  Client-side component, i.e., an extension of `HttpClientConfigurer`, which enables a
SolrJ client to make requests to a secure Solr instance using the authentication mechanism
which the server understands.
+. Server-side component, which intercepts and authenticates incoming requests to Solr using
a mechanism defined in the plugin, such as Kerberos, Basic Auth or others.
+. Client-side component, i.e., an extension of `HttpClientConfigurer`, which enables a SolrJ
client to make requests to a secure Solr instance using the authentication mechanism which
the server understands.
 
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-EnablingaPlugin]]
 === Enabling a Plugin
 
 * Specify the authentication plugin in `/security.json` as in this example:
 +
-*security.json*
-+
 [source,java]
 ----
 {
@@ -111,12 +108,12 @@ An authentication plugin consists of two parts:
 }
 ----
 * All of the content in the authentication block of `security.json` would be passed on as
a map to the plugin during initialization.
-* An authentication plugin can also be used with a standalone Solr instance by passing in
`-DauthenticationPlugin=<plugin class name>` during the startup.
+* An authentication plugin can also be used with a standalone Solr instance by passing in
`-DauthenticationPlugin=<plugin class name>` during startup.
 
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-AvailableAuthenticationPlugins]]
 === Available Authentication Plugins
 
-Solr has two implementations of authentication plugins:
+Solr has the following implementations of authentication plugins:
 
 * <<kerberos-authentication-plugin.adoc#kerberos-authentication-plugin,Kerberos Authentication
Plugin>>
 * <<basic-authentication-plugin.adoc#basic-authentication-plugin,Basic Authentication
Plugin>>
@@ -130,11 +127,9 @@ An authorization plugin can be written for Solr by extending the {solr-javadocs}
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-LoadingaCustomPlugin]]
 === Loading a Custom Plugin
 
-* Make sure that the plug-in implementation is in the classpath.
+* Make sure that the plugin implementation is in the classpath.
 * The plugin can then be initialized by specifying the same in `security.json` in the following
manner:
 
-*security.json*
-
 [source,java]
 ----
 {
@@ -148,9 +143,7 @@ All of the content in the `authorization` block of `security.json` would
be pass
 
 [IMPORTANT]
 ====
-
-The authorization plugin is only supported in SolrCloud mode. Also, reloading the plugin
isn't supported at this point and requires a restart of the Solr instance (meaning, the JVM
should be restarted, not simply a core reload).
-
+The authorization plugin is only supported in SolrCloud mode. Also, reloading the plugin
isn't yet supported and requires a restart of the Solr installation (meaning, the JVM should
be restarted, not simply a core reload).
 ====
 
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-AvailableAuthorizationPlugins]]
@@ -165,7 +158,7 @@ Solr has one implementation of an authorization plugin:
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-PKI]]
 == Securing Inter-Node Requests
 
-There are a lot of requests that originate from the Solr nodes itself. e.g., requests from
overseer to nodes, recovery threads, etc. Each Authentication plugin declares whether it is
capable of securing inter-node requests or not. If not, Solr will fall back to using a special
internode authentication mechanism where each Solr node is a super user and is fully trusted
by other Solr nodes, described below.
+There are a lot of requests that originate from the Solr nodes itself. For example, requests
from overseer to nodes, recovery threads, etc. Each Authentication plugin declares whether
it is capable of securing inter-node requests or not. If not, Solr will fall back to using
a special internode authentication mechanism where each Solr node is a super user and is fully
trusted by other Solr nodes, described below.
 
 [[AuthenticationandAuthorizationPlugins-PKIAuthenticationPlugin]]
 === PKIAuthenticationPlugin


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