jmeter-user mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From "Robin D. Wilson" <rwils...@gmail.com>
Subject RE: what is the use of assertion
Date Thu, 09 Oct 2014 16:16:39 GMT
Fair enough - perhaps 'expensive' was the wrong wording... "Not free" is a better wording...

The more assertions you use in each response, the higher the overhead will be on processing
the response - and the slower your JMeter throughput will be.

Therefore, use them _efficiently_ to detect whether your responses are proper for your test
conditions. They are like 'seasonings' - not too much, or you'll overpower your test. But
too little will make your test ineffective and unable to reveal what you think it is revealing.

--
Robin D. Wilson
Sr. Director of Web Development
KingsIsle Entertainment, Inc.
VOICE: 512-777-1861
http://www.kingsisle.com

-----Original Message-----
From: sebb [mailto:sebbaz@gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2014 7:56 AM
To: JMeter Users List
Subject: Re: what is the use of assertion

On 9 October 2014 13:44, Robin D. Wilson <rwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:
> Here's a real-life example:
>
> In our web application, many of our pages return a "200" response code, but the actual
page returned is an error message to the end user. In our system, all of our "end user error
messages" follow a consistent pattern in the HTML of the returned page. So we have a negative
assertion that checks that these patterns don't exist in any returned page - so we know that
the system did not return an error during the JMeter run.
>
> Likewise, on most pages we have an assertion for some HTML pattern that will only be
present if the correct successful page is returned.
>
> BUT, assertions are relatively expensive in JMeter - meaning they add 
> a lot of test of processing to the script, and slow down throughput of 
> JMeter. (They use regular expressions to parse the returned data fro 
> the server, which takes a lot of compute power.)
So use them efficiently...

There are many different Assertions; some are more expensive than others.
The Response Assertion only uses regexes for 'Contains' and 'Matches'
If 'Substring' can be used, it will be cheaper.

> --
> Robin D. Wilson
> VOICE: 512-777-1861
>
>
>
> On Oct 9, 2014, at 4:26 AM, ZK <stevesenior69@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hi,
> Assertions let you check the response you receive are the correct 
> expected responses
>
> See here:
> http://blazemeter.com/blog/how-use-jmeter-assertions-3-easy-steps
>
> ZK
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: 
> http://jmeter.512774.n5.nabble.com/what-is-the-use-of-assertion-tp5721
> 177p5721178.html Sent from the JMeter - User mailing list archive at 
> Nabble.com.
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: user-unsubscribe@jmeter.apache.org
> For additional commands, e-mail: user-help@jmeter.apache.org
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: user-unsubscribe@jmeter.apache.org
> For additional commands, e-mail: user-help@jmeter.apache.org
>

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To unsubscribe, e-mail: user-unsubscribe@jmeter.apache.org
For additional commands, e-mail: user-help@jmeter.apache.org


---------------------------------------------------------------------
To unsubscribe, e-mail: user-unsubscribe@jmeter.apache.org
For additional commands, e-mail: user-help@jmeter.apache.org


Mime
View raw message