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From Zippy Zeppoli <zippyzepp...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: complex javascript actions in jmeter load test
Date Thu, 07 Feb 2013 03:13:06 GMT
It's the difference between measuring wind speed with an anemometer and
your wet finger in the air.

On Wednesday, February 6, 2013, Deepak Shetty wrote:

> >I think you may be  missing the point.
> Heh - the feelings mutual
> >There is no DOM rendering happening...and it won't reflect the true
> response time
> If you need browser times , yes Jmeter cant help you directly.
>
> But browser render times are really irrelevant to a *load test*. Lets say
> using any tool you have loaded the server with some high load . Now Lets
> say you and I (assume the addition of two requests makes no difference to
> the server). access this via a browser with similar conditions(same
> browser, network, cpu, memory etc). Is there any difference that you and I
> will see? Do you really need two or many browsers to figure out how much
> time your DOM rendering is taking or will one browser suffice?(lets ignore
> that you still arent getting "true" times - because browser times are
> dependent on what else the user is doing, what sort of network bandwidth he
> has , what browser he is using, what are IE cache settings are and so on).
>
> Pre - cloud , it was prohibitive to drive browsers to do load tests - now
> it is possible , but the amount of additional value that you get over a
> http request/response load test and some browser analysis is minimal to
> none. (Some types of scripts are easier to write with a browser driven tool
> though).
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Zippy Zeppoli <zippyzeppoli@gmail.com<javascript:;>
> >wrote:
>
> > I think you may be  missing the point.
> > Real load cannot be tested via HTTP interactions.
> > There is no DOM rendering happening.
> > I can make HTTP requests all day and it won't reflect the true response
> > time unless it's done through a browser.
> >
> > Recording a script in Jmeter proxy is trivial. Simulating *real* user
> load
> > is not it requires a browser and interactions with a web application.
> >
> > On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 6:51 PM, Deepak Shetty <shettyd@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > >Actually that does matter it cannot do JavaScript. If a request
> requires
> > > >you need to be able to click a JavaScript button then the request will
> > > >never happen.
> > > The point is that what happens when the button is clicked? Assuming
> its a
> > > server - ajax call then A HTTP call is made and some parameters are
> > passed
> > > and some values are returned. Thats whats important for the load test ,
> > not
> > > the fact that javascript was executed.
> > > So when you record the script , you will be the person clicking the
> > > button(you are recording your actions) , JMeter will record every
> > > interaction that makes a call to the server and will record this as a
> > > separate HTTP request and when you run the script the same request will
> > be
> > > made as if someone clicked the button!
> > >
> > > You dont need to use the recorder either , you can modify the script
> > > yourself.
> > >
> > > If the javascript didnt actually make any server side call - then it
> > doesnt
> > > matter because you dont want to load test this anyway.
> > >
> > > Have you actually tried this? It sounds as if you have a problem
> > recording
> > > your script and you probably have concluded that JMeter doesnt do
> > > javascript (true) and hence cant test websites that do javascript/ajax
> > > (false)
> > >
> > > >Real browser is needed
> > > Not for a good deal of use cases - as many of the people on this
> mailing
> > > list can attest too.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 6:44 PM, Zippy Zeppoli <zippyzeppoli@gmail.com
> > > >wrote:
> > >
> > > > Deepak,
> > > > Actually that does matter it cannot do JavaScript. If a request
> > requires
> > > > you need to be able to click a JavaScript button then the request
> will
> > > > never happen. No request will ever be made.  Also testing true web
> > > > performance requires rendering the DOM, not just initiating HTTP
> > requests
> > > > and recording the response time, rps, etc.
> > > >
> > > > Real browser is needed, with JavaScript, and Jmeter doesn't integrate
> > > well
> > > > with this, it isn't designed for this, which is understandable. The
> > > problem
> > > > is there is a gap between real browser testing (owned by third party
> > > > companies) and open source tools (Jmeter). There's nothing in between
> > for
> > > > real-browser based performance testing. I could go into why, but its
> > off
> > > > topic of this list, and I'd rather spare everyone the gas.
> > > >
> > > > Point being, Jmeter cannot solve my problem, without some serious
> > > > customization.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 6:33 PM, Deepak Shetty <shettyd@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Hi
> > > > > You are getting too caught up in the JMeter doesnt do javascript
> > thing.
> > > > In
> > > > > most cases it doesnt matter.
> > > > > You have a webserver that is receiving HTTP requests - whether
> those
> > > > > requests are generated via the user clicking a link or via AJAX or
> > via
> > > > > flash is hardly relevant to the webserver. It sees HTTP requests
> and
> > > > sends
> > > > > HTTP responses.
> > > > > JMeter deals with HTTP request and responses. As long as you can
> make
> > > the
> > > > > same request that your javascript is making (which you can see via
> > the
> > > > > record

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