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From kirk <kirk.pepperd...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: 3600 Threads with a rampup of 3600 seconds?
Date Thu, 10 Jul 2008 11:08:50 GMT
Hi,
>>
>> Long story short, your server does not care much about the number of
>> concurrent users, it is just receiving the requests, processing them
>> and sending out the response.

I would beg do differ. For one thing if you are using cookies and 
sessions, the server will be holding onto resources for each user. 
Because of this the number of concurrent users can make a difference. 
This is a problem if you just loop over 25 users using JMeter. It caches 
the session ID and if you want a different user on each run you'll have 
to do something to make sure that it happens as expected. Otherwise you 
won't get the resource consumption that you'd see in a real system.

Thanks for the links though. I might add a shameless plug for 
www.javaperformancetuning.com.

Regards,
Kirk
>>  So basically, what you are emulating is
>> number of different HTTP Sampler calls per second. With JMeter, you
>> could run those Samplers more frequently, i.e. simulate more users
>> with less threads. That is, if you configure everything right. And if
>> you loop those threads, you don't have to spawn a new one for every
>> new run through the user model.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Andrey
>>
>> If you loop some threads which are sending out the requests much
>> faster than real users, and if you configure those threads right, the
>> generated load will be the same as the one generated by more you could
>> generate the same load as many of those real users with some large
>> thinking time do.
>> On Thu, Jul 10, 2008 at 10:44 AM, Abel MacAdam <abel.macadam@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>     
>>> Peter and Sebb,
>>>
>>> Thanks for your reply.
>>>
>>> How would you emulate:
>>> "During peak hours we get a maximum of 3600 requests per hour."
>>> and
>>> "Each step in the sales process may cost a maximum of 1 second"
>>>
>>> I think the second request is not possible to emulate, as it depends on
>>> the
>>> webserver and traffic on the Internet, not on JMeter.
>>>
>>> The transaction I need to test consists of 6 pages. Different pages where
>>> you need to fill in personal data. Compare it with entering your personal
>>> data
>>> when you buy something at Amazon.
>>>
>>> Should I add "think" time at each page, so the "user" I emulate has the
>>> time to enter information? 10 Seconds per page where you need to enter
>>> something? That makes a transaction time of 20 seconds (two pages where
>>> data needs to be entered).
>>>
>>> 1 Does that make 6 requests in 20 seconds?
>>> 2 Should I multiply that with 600, to get 3600 requests?
>>> or
>>> 3a Should I multiply that with 180 to get 3600 seconds? (eg repeat 180
>>> times)
>>> and
>>> 3b  Should I use 4 users (3,333) to get from 180 to 600 requests?
>>>
>>> Eventually I used 25 threads with a ramp up of 25 seconds, to be repeated
>>> indefinitely. I observed that the server had problems (response code 502)
>>> responding to the load.
>>>
>>> Abel
>>>
>>>
>>> sebb-2-2 wrote:
>>>       
>>>> On 09/07/2008, Abel MacAdam <abel.macadam@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>         
>>>>>  Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>>  Today I tried to emulate "3600 users in one hour" by making a test
>>>>> where
>>>>>  3600 threads where started in 3600 seconds. I observed that the load
>>>>> in
>>>>> one
>>>>>  of my CPU's went to 100 %, and that JMeter stopped responding.
>>>>> Eventually I
>>>>>  killed this process, and restarted it with 25 threads, to be started
>>>>> within
>>>>>  25 seconds, and looping forever, but now for 3600 seconds (one hour).
>>>>> Now
>>>>>  the test is running, while my CPU-usage is idling at away between 2
>>>>> and
>>>>> 5 %.
>>>>>  At the same time I'm writing this question. So all in all a much
>>>>> better
>>>>>  situation.
>>>>>
>>>>>  My question: Is JMeter loading all 3600 threads in memory, resulting
>>>>> in
>>>>>  requiring that much memory and processor power?
>>>>>
>>>>>           
>>>> 3600 threads is rather a lot for one JMeter instance.
>>>> Too many for your test plan, as you have found.
>>>>
>>>> Note that a single thread can generate a much higher load than a
>>>> single user, as JMeter can issue requests much faster than a user
>>>> clicking links.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>         
>>>>>  Thanks,
>>>>>  Abel
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>  View this message in context:
>>>>> http://www.nabble.com/3600-Threads-with-a-rampup-of-3600-seconds--tp18363108p18363108.html
>>>>>  Sent from the JMeter - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>>>>
>>>>>
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>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>           
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>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>         
>>> --
>>> View this message in context:
>>> http://www.nabble.com/3600-Threads-with-a-rampup-of-3600-seconds--tp18363108p18376917.html
>>> Sent from the JMeter - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>>
>>>
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>>>
>>>
>>>       
>>
>> -- 
>> diem perdidi
>>
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>>
>>
>>     
>
>   


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