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From acoli...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: jakarta-site/docs/site idedevelopers.html guides.html
Date Sun, 24 Nov 2002 17:16:20 GMT
acoliver    2002/11/24 09:16:19

  Modified:    xdocs/site guides.xml
               docs/site guides.html
  Added:       xdocs/site idedevelopers.xml
               docs/site idedevelopers.html
  Log:
  added a new guide for those "special" ide developers ;-)
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.9       +1 -0      jakarta-site/xdocs/site/guides.xml
  
  Index: guides.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-site/xdocs/site/guides.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.8
  retrieving revision 1.9
  diff -u -r1.8 -r1.9
  --- guides.xml	28 May 2002 03:48:01 -0000	1.8
  +++ guides.xml	24 Nov 2002 17:16:19 -0000	1.9
  @@ -94,6 +94,7 @@
     </li>
     <li><a href="contact.html"> Contact Information</a></li>
     <li><a href="getinvolved.html"> Get Involved</a></li>
  +  <li><a href="idedevelopers.html">The IDE Developer's Guide</a></li>
   </ul>
   
   <h2>Moderator's Guide</h2>
  
  
  
  1.1                  jakarta-site/xdocs/site/idedevelopers.xml
  
  Index: idedevelopers.xml
  ===================================================================
  <?xml version="1.0"?>
  <document>
  
    <properties>
      <author email="acoliver@apache.org">Andrew C. Oliver</author>
      <title>IDE Developer's Guide</title>
    </properties>
  
  <body>
  
    <section name="IDE Developer's Guide">
     <p>
       There is a new breed of developer in today's 
       <a href="http://java.sun.com">Java</a> community that is rapidly 
       discovering <a href="http://www.apache.org">Apache</a> and more 
       frequently the <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Jakarta</a> part
       of the greater Apache community.  These developers often come to us 
       with little or no command-line experience, some cut their teeth on
       tools like <a href="http://www.microsoft.com">Microsoft's</a> 
       Visual Basic or other such tools and later moved on to IDEs such as
       <a href="http://www.borland.com/jbuilder/">JBuilder</a>, 
       <a href="http://www.netbeans.org/">Netbeans</a> and now
       <a href="http://www.eclipse.org/">Eclipse</a>.  While the first
       generation of Java developer became intimately familiar with command
       line tools, the JDK, the classpath and the ins and outs of things that
       are now the core of Java development, this "new breed" of developer 
       often has little knowledge outside his own IDE, and sometimes doesn't
       even understand what it is doing.  This guide does not hope to fix that
       but hopes to improve the situation and give the "IDE Developer" a stepping
       block, a starting point, if you will so that they too can participate 
       in our <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Apache Jakarta</a> community.
     </p>
    </section>
    <section name="The classpath">
     <p>
       The Classpath is the fundemental concept behind Java's library usagage.
       Think of the Classpath as the Java PATH in Windows or UNIX.  Instead of
       telling the operating system where to find executables, it tells Java
       where to find class files.  You can read more about the classpath 
       <a href="http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/tooldocs/win32/classpath.html">
       here</a>, and <a href="http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/win32.html">here</a>

     </p>
     <p>
       Most IDEs abstract you from the classpath by having you declare and set
       up libraries.  A common mistake that most IDE developers make is to 
       include two versions of the same library in the classpath often in the 
       wrong order.  This can cause a number of problems including errant behavior
       and strange jar sealing exceptions.  Its best to start from scratch and 
       never just "bootstrap" your project with a classpath from another project
       that is full of things it doesn't need.  
     </p>
     <p>
       <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Apache Jakarta</a> is known for being
       full of helpful expert developers, however, the a quick way to wear out
       your welcome is to demand assistance without sorting out your classpath
       first.  There is nothing more frustrating than a hard to kill bug that 
       is actually fixed just someone has the old version in their classpath.
       So whether you're setting it in your IDE's library manager or at the 
       commandline, shell script, or through <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">your
Ant build tool</a>: make sure you know what is in your classpath and
       that only what you need is there.
     </p>
     <p>TODO: IDE specific instructions for JBuilder, Netbeans and Eclipse.</p>
    </section>
    <section name="Ant and Compilation">
     <p>
       Most IDE developers see the IDE as the only modern and humane way to 
       program and any other tools as primitive.  This attitude will probably 
       get you laughed out of Jakarta and for good reason.  When you're working
       with multiple developers accross multiple platforms, this is a very 
       limited world view to have.  Think of it, how well does your carefully
       crafted "project" file help run nightly automated builds so that all the
       code that has been checked in to version control can be verified?   
       What about building on UNIX?  Running unit tests as part of the build?
       Lastly, what about complex dependencies and source structures due to 
       multiple code bases belonging to a project?  (IDEs are notoriously 
       rigid in the source directory structures they allow, some are breaking this
       presupposition, but some of the more popular ones still haven't).  There
       is a tool which meets all of these requirements and is the Cat's Meow too.
       Its called <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">Ant</a>.
     </p>
     <p>
       Ant started out as the build tool for the popular servlet engine
       now known as <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat">Tomcat</a>.
       Ant's cousin in the C world is called Make.  However unlike Make, Ant
       doesn't give you pathetic error messages about using tabs instead of 
       spaces (sick! really sick!) and has a much more easily digestible 
       syntax.  Ant's syntax is based on XML, mostly because they didn't want
       to write a parser when there were plenty around.  And writing an ant
       build.xml file is WAY easier than writing a makefile.  Most modern 
       Java IDEs support Ant either natively or through plugins.  Some even
       have GUIs to abstract you from the build file, however, you will need
       to acquire some familiarity with Ant over time as these tools often
       break with the complex build procedures often required.  Read more about
       Ant <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">here</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1930110588/qid=1038156813/sr=8-4/ref=sr_8_4/102-7589210-1797738?v=glance&amp;s=books&amp;n=507846#product-details">here</a>
and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0596001843/qid=1038156852/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-7589210-1797738?v=glance&amp;s=books">here</a>.
     </p>
    </section>
    <section name="CVS and Version control">
     <p>
       Its a depressing fact, but most companies either do not use, or misuse
       revision control.  Are you emailing files around?  That is the wrong way
       to work on the team.  Without proper sourcecode control we'd be up the 
       creek without a paddle at the Apache Jakarta project.  So we make 
       extensive use of CVS here.  One day this may change to a more modern and
       sophisticated revision control program like <a href="subversion.tigris.org">Subversion</a>
but that day hasn't quite come yet.  
     </p>
     <p>
       Revision control ensures that the old version of code is kept and that
       the deltas (or changes) are stored for newer versions.  By using 
       <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/cvs_4.html#SEC48">Tags</a>
you
       can even reproduce an entire software release from history.  By using
       <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/cvs_5.html#SEC58">Branches</a>
you can develop two versions at once.  For instance
       if we release 1.0 of our software, and start working on the 2.0 version
       only to discover a bug in 1.0; we can still create a 1.1 without getting
       any of the 2.0 code mixed in.  This isn't only power, its a necessity!
     </p>
     <p>
       You NEED to read <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/">this</a>
if
       you don't understand how CVS works.  Even if you never use the command-line
       tools, you need to understand the concepts behind CVS.  At least scan it
       even if you're familiar with other revision control systems like 
       Visual SourceSafe or PVCS, because CVS is its own beast.  
     </p>
     <p>
       All of the Apache Jakarta Project's software is stored in CVS under 
       revision control.  And to contribute to the project you need to create 
       "patches" with the cvs diff -u command (or the GUI equivilent).  The 
       -u specifies the more brief and useful format.  To do that you need to 
       have a working copy of the software.  Instructions and a list of modules
       can be found <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/cvsindex.html">here</a>.
       You'll even find instructions on how to use GUI tools with CVS, many of
       which are free.  <a href="http://www.eclipse.org">Eclipse</a> and 
       <a href="http://www.netbeans.org">Netbeans</a> already have very good 
       support for CVS built in.
     </p>
    </section>
   </body>
  </document>
  
  
  
  1.20      +1 -0      jakarta-site/docs/site/guides.html
  
  Index: guides.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-site/docs/site/guides.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.19
  retrieving revision 1.20
  diff -u -r1.19 -r1.20
  --- guides.html	12 Nov 2002 15:30:06 -0000	1.19
  +++ guides.html	24 Nov 2002 17:16:19 -0000	1.20
  @@ -235,6 +235,7 @@
     </li>
     <li><a href="contact.html"> Contact Information</a></li>
     <li><a href="getinvolved.html"> Get Involved</a></li>
  +  <li><a href="idedevelopers.html">The IDE Developer's Guide</a></li>
   </ul>
                                                   <h2>Moderator's Guide</h2>
                                                   <p>What mailing list moderators need
to know.</p>
  
  
  
  1.1                  jakarta-site/docs/site/idedevelopers.html
  
  Index: idedevelopers.html
  ===================================================================
  <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
  
  <!-- Content Stylesheet for Site -->
  
          
  <!-- start the processing -->
      <!-- ====================================================================== -->
      <!-- GENERATED FILE, DO NOT EDIT, EDIT THE XML FILE IN xdocs INSTEAD! -->
      <!-- Main Page Section -->
      <!-- ====================================================================== -->
      <html>
          <head>
              <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"/>
  
                                                      <meta name="author" value="Andrew
C. Oliver">
              <meta name="email" value="acoliver@apache.org">
              
             
                                      
              <title>The Jakarta Site - IDE Developer's Guide</title>
          </head>
  
          <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000" link="#525D76">        
              <table border="0" width="100%" cellspacing="0">
                  <!-- TOP IMAGE -->
                  <tr>
                      <td colspan="2">
  <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org"><img src="http://jakarta.apache.org/images/jakarta-logo.gif"
align="left" border="0"/></a>
  </td>
                  </tr>
              </table>
              <table border="0" width="100%" cellspacing="4">
                  <tr><td colspan="2">
                      <hr noshade="" size="1"/>
                  </td></tr>
                  
                  <tr>
                      <!-- LEFT SIDE NAVIGATION -->
                      <td width="20%" valign="top" nowrap="true">
                                  <p><strong>About Jakarta</strong></p>
          <ul>
                      <li>    <a href="../index.html">Welcome</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/news/index.html">News
& Status</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/mission.html">Our
Mission</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/faqs.html">Our
FAQs</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/library.html">Reference
Library</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://www.google.com/advanced_search?q=+site:jakarta.apache.org&hl=en&as_qdr=all">Search
Jakarta</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/vendors.html">Vendor
Support</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/contact.html">Contacting
Us</a>
  </li>
                  </ul>
              <p><strong>Download</strong></p>
          <ul>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/binindex.html">Binaries</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/sourceindex.html">Source
Code</a>
  </li>
                  </ul>
              <p><strong>Get Involved</strong></p>
          <ul>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/getinvolved.html">How
to ...</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/cvsindex.html">CVS
Repositories</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/mail.html">Mailing
Lists</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/bugs.html">Bug
Database</a>
  </li>
                  </ul>
              <p><strong>SubProjects</strong></p>
          <ul>
                      <li>    <a href="../alexandria/index.html">Alexandria</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../ant/index.html">Ant</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../avalon/index.html">Avalon</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../bcel/index.html">BCEL</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../bsf/index.html">BSF</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../cactus/index.html">Cactus</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../commons/index.html">Commons</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../ecs/index.html">ECS</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../james/index.html">James</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../jetspeed/index.html">Jetspeed</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../jmeter/index.html">JMeter</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../log4j/index.html">Log4J</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../lucene/index.html">Lucene</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../ojb/index.html">OJB</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../oro/index.html">ORO</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../poi/index.html">POI</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../regexp/index.html">Regexp</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../slide/index.html">Slide</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../struts/index.html">Struts</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../taglibs/index.html">Taglibs</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../tomcat/index.html">Tomcat</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../turbine/index.html">Turbine</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../velocity/index.html">Velocity</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="../watchdog/index.html">Watchdog</a>
  </li>
                  </ul>
              <p><strong>Project Management</strong></p>
          <ul>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/whoweare.html">Who
We Are</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/guidelines.html">Project
Guidelines</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/newproject.html">New
Subprojects</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/jakarta-site2.html">Website
Maintenance</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/acknowledgements.html">Acknowledgements</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/legal.html">Legal</a>
  </li>
                      <li>    <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/jspa-position.html">Apache
on the JSPA</a>
  </li>
                  </ul>
                          </td>
                      <td width="80%" align="left" valign="top">
                                                                      <table border="0"
cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2" width="100%">
        <tr><td bgcolor="#525D76">
          <font color="#ffffff" face="arial,helvetica,sanserif">
            <a name="IDE Developer's Guide"><strong>IDE Developer's Guide</strong></a>
          </font>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td>
          <blockquote>
                                      <p>
       There is a new breed of developer in today's 
       <a href="http://java.sun.com">Java</a> community that is rapidly 
       discovering <a href="http://www.apache.org">Apache</a> and more 
       frequently the <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Jakarta</a> part
       of the greater Apache community.  These developers often come to us 
       with little or no command-line experience, some cut their teeth on
       tools like <a href="http://www.microsoft.com">Microsoft's</a> 
       Visual Basic or other such tools and later moved on to IDEs such as
       <a href="http://www.borland.com/jbuilder/">JBuilder</a>, 
       <a href="http://www.netbeans.org/">Netbeans</a> and now
       <a href="http://www.eclipse.org/">Eclipse</a>.  While the first
       generation of Java developer became intimately familiar with command
       line tools, the JDK, the classpath and the ins and outs of things that
       are now the core of Java development, this "new breed" of developer 
       often has little knowledge outside his own IDE, and sometimes doesn't
       even understand what it is doing.  This guide does not hope to fix that
       but hopes to improve the situation and give the "IDE Developer" a stepping
       block, a starting point, if you will so that they too can participate 
       in our <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Apache Jakarta</a> community.
     </p>
                              </blockquote>
          </p>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td><br/></td></tr>
      </table>
                                                  <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2"
width="100%">
        <tr><td bgcolor="#525D76">
          <font color="#ffffff" face="arial,helvetica,sanserif">
            <a name="The classpath"><strong>The classpath</strong></a>
          </font>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td>
          <blockquote>
                                      <p>
       The Classpath is the fundemental concept behind Java's library usagage.
       Think of the Classpath as the Java PATH in Windows or UNIX.  Instead of
       telling the operating system where to find executables, it tells Java
       where to find class files.  You can read more about the classpath 
       <a href="http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/tooldocs/win32/classpath.html">
       here</a>, and <a href="http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/win32.html">here</a>

     </p>
                                                  <p>
       Most IDEs abstract you from the classpath by having you declare and set
       up libraries.  A common mistake that most IDE developers make is to 
       include two versions of the same library in the classpath often in the 
       wrong order.  This can cause a number of problems including errant behavior
       and strange jar sealing exceptions.  Its best to start from scratch and 
       never just "bootstrap" your project with a classpath from another project
       that is full of things it doesn't need.  
     </p>
                                                  <p>
       <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org">Apache Jakarta</a> is known for being
       full of helpful expert developers, however, the a quick way to wear out
       your welcome is to demand assistance without sorting out your classpath
       first.  There is nothing more frustrating than a hard to kill bug that 
       is actually fixed just someone has the old version in their classpath.
       So whether you're setting it in your IDE's library manager or at the 
       commandline, shell script, or through <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">your
Ant build tool</a>: make sure you know what is in your classpath and
       that only what you need is there.
     </p>
                                                  <p>TODO: IDE specific instructions
for JBuilder, Netbeans and Eclipse.</p>
                              </blockquote>
          </p>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td><br/></td></tr>
      </table>
                                                  <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2"
width="100%">
        <tr><td bgcolor="#525D76">
          <font color="#ffffff" face="arial,helvetica,sanserif">
            <a name="Ant and Compilation"><strong>Ant and Compilation</strong></a>
          </font>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td>
          <blockquote>
                                      <p>
       Most IDE developers see the IDE as the only modern and humane way to 
       program and any other tools as primitive.  This attitude will probably 
       get you laughed out of Jakarta and for good reason.  When you're working
       with multiple developers accross multiple platforms, this is a very 
       limited world view to have.  Think of it, how well does your carefully
       crafted "project" file help run nightly automated builds so that all the
       code that has been checked in to version control can be verified?   
       What about building on UNIX?  Running unit tests as part of the build?
       Lastly, what about complex dependencies and source structures due to 
       multiple code bases belonging to a project?  (IDEs are notoriously 
       rigid in the source directory structures they allow, some are breaking this
       presupposition, but some of the more popular ones still haven't).  There
       is a tool which meets all of these requirements and is the Cat's Meow too.
       Its called <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">Ant</a>.
     </p>
                                                  <p>
       Ant started out as the build tool for the popular servlet engine
       now known as <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat">Tomcat</a>.
       Ant's cousin in the C world is called Make.  However unlike Make, Ant
       doesn't give you pathetic error messages about using tabs instead of 
       spaces (sick! really sick!) and has a much more easily digestible 
       syntax.  Ant's syntax is based on XML, mostly because they didn't want
       to write a parser when there were plenty around.  And writing an ant
       build.xml file is WAY easier than writing a makefile.  Most modern 
       Java IDEs support Ant either natively or through plugins.  Some even
       have GUIs to abstract you from the build file, however, you will need
       to acquire some familiarity with Ant over time as these tools often
       break with the complex build procedures often required.  Read more about
       Ant <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/ant">here</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1930110588/qid=1038156813/sr=8-4/ref=sr_8_4/102-7589210-1797738?v=glance&amp;s=books&amp;n=507846#product-details">here</a>
and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0596001843/qid=1038156852/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-7589210-1797738?v=glance&amp;s=books">here</a>.
     </p>
                              </blockquote>
          </p>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td><br/></td></tr>
      </table>
                                                  <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2"
width="100%">
        <tr><td bgcolor="#525D76">
          <font color="#ffffff" face="arial,helvetica,sanserif">
            <a name="CVS and Version control"><strong>CVS and Version control</strong></a>
          </font>
        </td></tr>
        <tr><td>
          <blockquote>
                                      <p>
       Its a depressing fact, but most companies either do not use, or misuse
       revision control.  Are you emailing files around?  That is the wrong way
       to work on the team.  Without proper sourcecode control we'd be up the 
       creek without a paddle at the Apache Jakarta project.  So we make 
       extensive use of CVS here.  One day this may change to a more modern and
       sophisticated revision control program like <a href="subversion.tigris.org">Subversion</a>
but that day hasn't quite come yet.  
     </p>
                                                  <p>
       Revision control ensures that the old version of code is kept and that
       the deltas (or changes) are stored for newer versions.  By using 
       <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/cvs_4.html#SEC48">Tags</a>
you
       can even reproduce an entire software release from history.  By using
       <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/cvs_5.html#SEC58">Branches</a>
you can develop two versions at once.  For instance
       if we release 1.0 of our software, and start working on the 2.0 version
       only to discover a bug in 1.0; we can still create a 1.1 without getting
       any of the 2.0 code mixed in.  This isn't only power, its a necessity!
     </p>
                                                  <p>
       You NEED to read <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/">this</a>
if
       you don't understand how CVS works.  Even if you never use the command-line
       tools, you need to understand the concepts behind CVS.  At least scan it
       even if you're familiar with other revision control systems like 
       Visual SourceSafe or PVCS, because CVS is its own beast.  
     </p>
                                                  <p>
       All of the Apache Jakarta Project's software is stored in CVS under 
       revision control.  And to contribute to the project you need to create 
       "patches" with the cvs diff -u command (or the GUI equivilent).  The 
       -u specifies the more brief and useful format.  To do that you need to 
       have a working copy of the software.  Instructions and a list of modules
       can be found <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/cvsindex.html">here</a>.
       You'll even find instructions on how to use GUI tools with CVS, many of
       which are free.  <a href="http://www.eclipse.org">Eclipse</a> and 
       <a href="http://www.netbeans.org">Netbeans</a> already have very good 
       support for CVS built in.
     </p>
                              </blockquote>
          </p>
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