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From Juergen Schmidt <jogischm...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Outreach techniques -- what works
Date Mon, 08 Oct 2012 20:22:55 GMT

Am Montag, 8. Oktober 2012 um 19:03 schrieb Rob Weir: 
> Some quick observations based on recent experience and metrics. I
> think this is important when we consider ways of reaching out for
> volunteers.
> 
> Facts:
> 
> 1) Adding something an the www.openoffice.org homepage, as a news
> story, gets around 80K hits/day
> 
> 2) Adding something to the header on all of ooo-site gets 800K hits/day
> 
> 3) Putting out a blog post on blogs.apache.org gets around 1K hits/day
> 
> 4) Sending something out by Twitter gets maybe 1K, but it is a one-time thing
> 
> 5) Sending something out via announcement list reaches 8K users, but
> this is also one-time
> 
> 6) Other mailing lists, like ooo-dev and ooo-users reach a few hundred users
> 
> 
> What is effective? What isn't? What gets the eyeballs?
> 
> 
> Case 1: Google Moderator
> 
> Over we had 1,116 users submit 910 ideas and cast 13,354 votes. This
> was promoted via mailing list, social networking, blog post,
> announcement list, but it did not really take off until I linked to it
> from the website header (method #2 above). This massively increased
> the number of people participating.
> 
> 
> Case 2: Danish and Polish translators.
> 
> I put a brief note on the Danish and Polish homepages, in English,
> saying that we would welcome volunteers:
> http://www.openoffice.org/da/
> 
> This was something so simple, so low tech that I never bothered to do
> it before because I was not sure it would be effective. But then I
> noticed that these NL home pages were getting nearly 5K hits/day.
> Although this is a much smaller audience, it is a very targeted
> audience.
> 
> Within 48 hours of putting these notes up we now have multiple
> volunteers starting to work on completing the Polish and Danish
> translations. In fact now we need to worry about how we coordinate
> multiple volunteers on the same language, a good problem to have.
> 
> 
> Case 3: QA volunteers (a negative example)
> 
> We've had a lot of good information on helping test AOO, on the wiki,
> automation code checked into SVN, test procedures, test reports, etc.
> All of this is happening in the open on ooo-dev and ooo-qa. But I
> don't think we have a really attracted any more test volunteers.
> Why?
> 
> Maybe this is because we have only asked on our lists, which have
> relatively few subscribers -- a few hundred -- compared to the how
> many we can reach out to via other means.
> 
> 
> So based on what I've seen, in this example and others, I'd recommend
> thinking like this:
> 
> 
> 1) Are we looking for a broad or targeted outreach?
> 
> 2) If narrow, look for targeting specific pages on the website that
> will be seen by those users
> 
> 3) If broad, consider something on the home page or the header on
> every page, like we're doing now with ApacheCon.
> 
> 4) Even though a blog post gets less traffic, it still might make
> sense to start there. It gives you something that you can then think
> to from other places, as well as a way to engage with the reader via
> comments.
> 
> 

thanks for this very interesting and useful observations and hints how to reach a broader
audience.  

Juergen
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