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From Hennie Potgieter <pbhj.potgie...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: After AOO 3.4, attracting new contributors
Date Sat, 31 Mar 2012 12:34:07 GMT
Please cancel all emails to me.
Tkanks

On Sat, Mar 31, 2012 at 7:03 AM, drew jensen <drewjensen.inbox@gmail.com>wrote:

> On Fri, 2012-03-30 at 23:21 -0400, Rob Weir wrote:
> > On Thu, Mar 29, 2012 at 12:35 PM, drew jensen <
> drewjensen.inbox@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > > On Thu, 2012-03-29 at 09:04 -0400, Rob Weir wrote:
> > > > On Thu, Mar 29, 2012 at 8:31 AM, Kevin Grignon <
> > > kevingrignon.oo@gmail.com>wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Rob,
> > > > >
> > > > > Sounds like we can appeal to contributors intrinsic and extrinsic
> > > > > motivation.
> > > > >
> > > > > Another newbie question: Does OO have any experience recruiting
> > > > > non-technical volunteers. Many disciplines outside coding can have
> an
> > > > > impact on the offering. Product management, UX, ID, training,
> visual
> > > > > design, marketing, communications, etc. How might we position
> > > ourselves as
> > > > > open product development? A wider net would attract the diverse
> skills
> > > that
> > > > > could really make the effort a success long term.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > See this page here, which our central "how can I help page":
> > > > http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/get-involved.html
> > > >
> > > > So we need and value contributors in a wide range of disciplines, not
> > > just
> > > > technical ones.
> > > >
> > > Hola Rob, Kevin
> > >
> > > Just an aside, if you will. At this years FOSDEM there was a panel
> > > discussion consisting of a number of the community managers. Included
> > > IIRC was openSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Ubuntu (in this case the speaker was
> > > specifically from the LoCo team project, not Ubuntu overall)...and a
> > > couple others whose affiliation I can not recall.
> > >
> > > One topic, which would be germane here, was on recruiting contributors.
> > >
> > > Across the panel the participants felt that finding and retaining
> > > _quality_ non-coding contributors has proven to be more difficult then
> > > coders. Unfortunately that was the extent of the topic discussion, they
> > > all agreed but not a single one went into Why they thought this was, or
> > > what particular obstacles, procedural or cultural, might be involved,
> or
> > > what actions if any they have implemented to address the situation.
> > >
> > >
> > I think OpenOffice has had the opposite problem.  We have a long
> tradition
> > of having quality non-coding contributors, especially in areas like
> > translation, marketing, documentation, support, etc.  But we had an
> > over-reliance on corporate-sponsored engineers from a single company for
> > coding.  If I look at the project today, I see volunteers for non-coding
> > items volunteering on the list on a near-daily basis.  But not so often
> for
> > coding volunteers.
>
> Hi Rob,
>
> Yes, you and I it would seem concur on our observational assessment of
> the current situation.
>
> >
> > In any case, my point was not really about coders versus non-coders.
>  There
> > is enough work to go around.  My concern was more that we're not doing a
> > great job at getting new contributors involved in the project.  Look at
> our
> > committers list.  We have nearly 100 now.  How many of them are actually
> > new, e.g., were not involved with the legacy OpenOffice.org project.
>  Sure,
> > there are a few, but not many.
> >
> > Now look at the list archives for how many people of volunteered to help
> > with the documentation, with the website, with UI, with testing, etc.
>  How
> > many of them were able to break into actually contributing to the
> project.
> > Almost none of them, right?
>
> Yes, I'd agree. I also think it's fair to say, self forming volunteer
> organizations fit the pattern in general - and therefore even more so
> requires active attention always.
>
> >
> > So the issue, as I see it, is not an issue with attracting volunteers.
>  It
> > isan issue of helping the volunteers get started and helping them meet
> > their goals in project participation.
>
> Sure, no argument here on any of that. I'd follow up from the first
> paragraph, and add that IMO the new actors most needed right now are
> those fitting the thin area - engineering.
>
> I think this means that; from those doing the engineering, particularly
> those making decisions on the directions the code will be developed
> going forward a need to be mindful to keep the required processes open
> and transparent - pick your term here, and I hope all understand what I
> mean here.. this is in no way an indictment but rather statemtnt of what
> I see as a general principle
> - so that those whom would be interested in such work will know it is
> here.
>
> I think this is the first step in attracting engineering resources.
>
> From there then yes, the group needs to be proactive with organizing
> hackfeasts, or activities of such like, the non-engineering contributors
> can only at best help with this not drive it forward.
>
> Anyhow - A long, rambling response, befitting a late Friday night, and
> all surrounded of course by IMO ;)
>
> //drew
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> >
> > -Rob
> >
> >
> >
> > > Anyhow, just thought I'd pass it along. BTW I watched this on a live
> > > video stream but the panel discussion may be available in an on-line
> > > archive, I don't know one way of the other.
> > >
> > > //drew
> > >
> > > <snip>
> > >
> > >
>
>
>

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