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From Rob Weir <...@robweir.com>
Subject What could Doc be?
Date Wed, 31 Aug 2011 17:21:57 GMT
Re-titling this thread based on the topic drift.

On Wed, Aug 31, 2011 at 2:14 AM, Jean Weber <jeanweber@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> As I've noted before, tracking down past contributors to get agreement
> on changing the license of existing material would be difficult and in
> some cases impossible. Given that the existing material is the obvious
> place to start when producing user guides updated/amended for AOO,
> then the license of that existing material is relevant. AFAIK, we
> can't just take the material, revise it, and change the license; so
> the books would need to be completely rewritten. IMO that would be
> very impractical, because the available people barely keep up with
> minor updates.
>

How many volunteers do you have working on the documentation now? Or,
more important, how many do you think would show up when we get closer
to a new revision?

On the re-licencing question, what is the difficulty?  Is it a problem
with contacting the content contributors, due to changed email
addresses, etc?  Or are there difficulties determining who exactly
contributed to a given document, or similar pedigree issues?


> BTW, I think the user guides could do with a major overhaul, and if
> enough skilled technical writers turned up to do that job, I would be
> absolutely delighted. Alas, I can't see that happening, so all I can
> see (at least for the next year) is either a minor update to the
> existing books (under a compatible, but non-Apache, license) or... no
> books at all.
>

How many would be enough for a major overhaul?

It looks like you've given a lot of thought into the workflow around
doc productions, using OOo at the core.  This is good.  I know I've
advocated for DITA before, and it does have some nice things about it.
 But I can see the advantages of using our own editors for our own
documentation.

In any case, I'd urge you to think boldly about what we could do.  I
know we don't have the resources currently to do much more, but the
truth is we don't get the resources until we articulate a vision about
what we could do.  If we have a compelling vision, then we can try to
entice volunteers, corporate sponsors of editors, etc.

So if resources were not an issue, what would we do?  What could we
do?  How could a fully resourced doc effort best contribute to the
overall success of the project and our users?

-Rob

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