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From David Francis Buhler <davidbuh...@gmail.com>
Subject [Component Accessibility]
Date Fri, 27 Jan 2012 15:05:57 GMT
Changing Thread Name

On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 10:00 PM, Nicholas Kwiatkowski
<nicholas@spoon.as> wrote:
> I've been doing a lot of work with Michigan State University's Research
> Center for Persons with Disabilities (RCPD for short).  Their
> recommendation for the blind up until two years ago was JAWS with IE.  They
> always said it was the best supported, and worked with the most websites.
> I guess Firefox really does a poor job of integrating into the JAWS or any
> other text-reading app.
>
> Their latest tests have all been revolving around the mobile space.  The
> reports pretty much go that iOS has some of the best accessibility, and
> Android is passable, at best.  When writing in XCode / Objective-C for the
> iOS platform, by using the built-in widgets, you get accessibility for free
> (which includes the vast majority of the apps in the store).  Android gives
> the developer the APIs for it, but they are rarely implemented.  AIR for
> both iOS and Android do NOT support any forms of accessibility.  We tried
> to jerry-wrig it up with an ANE for iOS, and it didn't work right (every
> time we tapped into the APIs, we lost focus of the current control).
>
> The reason why RCPD is so hot about mobile is that by default most of the
> apps take care many of the accessibility issues.  They are designed to work
> with touch (no mouse), they will work well for a single-handed person, they
> rarely require multiple fingers to do anything, the touch areas are BIG and
> most often the text is BIG.  Most don't utilize sound or require speech.
> Assuming a color pallet that uses contrasting colors, most apps are
> compatible with the federal laws out the gate.
>
> I hope we get access to the some of the APIs that the FP would be able to
> expose.  It has held us back in the past, and would be very useful in the
> future as we try to move Flex into the mobile space head-first.
>
> -Nick
>
> On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 8:53 PM, David Francis Buhler <davidbuhler@gmail.com
>> wrote:
>
>> Listening to the screen reader's robotic voice reading the same content
>> over and over for 100s of hours while testing accessibility....now,
>> that...is a nightmare.
>> On Jan 26, 2012 8:25 PM, "Rick Winscot" <rick.winscot@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> > What would be great for 508 is to implement first class mechanisms for
>> > accessibility ... creating new components that are accessible (the Flash
>> > way) is a nightmare.
>> >  On Jan 26, 2012 5:53 PM, "Michael Jordan" <mijordan@adobe.com> wrote:
>> >
>> > >
>> > > On 1/26/12 1:54 PM, "Alex Harui" <aharui@adobe.com> wrote:
>> > >
>> > > >> -----Original Message-----
>> > > >> From: David Francis Buhler [mailto:davidbuhler@gmail.com]
>> > > >> Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 10:48 AM
>> > > >> To: flex-dev@incubator.apache.org
>> > > >> Subject: RE: Pushing Flex components thorough the GPU
>> > > >>
>> > > >> Windows, Jaws, jaws scripts, and IE. :)
>> > > >> On Jan 26, 2012 1:29 PM, "Alex Harui" <aharui@adobe.com>
wrote:
>> > > >>
>> > > >I'm not the expert, but one of our Adobe PPMC members is (Michael,
are
>> > > >you out there?), but I believe we work with more than just Jaws and
>> IE.
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > >Alex Harui
>> > > >Flex SDK Developer
>> > > >Adobe Systems Inc.
>> > > >Blog: http://blogs.adobe.com/aharui
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > That's correct, Alex.
>> > >
>> > > Screen reader support for the Flash Player is available on Windows in
>> IE
>> > > and Firefox for swfs embedded with wmode="window."
>> > >
>> > > JAWS, Window-Eyes, and the open source NVDA screen readers can read
>> Flash
>> > > content, but to date JAWS has the most comprehensive support for Flex.
>> > > This is because JAWS has scripts that work around limitations with the
>> > way
>> > > that the Flash Player is able to describe content through its
>> > > accessibility API.
>> > >
>> > > The Flash Player's accessibility support was implemented back in 2002,
>> > > around the time that the term "rich internet application" was coined.
>> To
>> > > limit the performance impact of maintaining, updating, and
>> communicating
>> > > role, state, and value information on a deep hierarchy of accessibility
>> > > objects, the decision was made to only expose one level of hierarchy
>> and
>> > > allow an accessibility object like a list to maintain a single array of
>> > > children with no decedents. This is unlike the behavior of desktop
>> > > applications which are able to expose the full hierarchy of a tree,
>> > panel,
>> > > or data grid with nested children. JAWS scripts improve the way the
>> > screen
>> > > reader user interacts with more complex controls like the TreeView and
>> > > ComboBox in IE.
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > Michael Jordan  |  Accessibility Engineer  |  Adobe
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>>

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