incubator-couchdb-user mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From Mark Deibert <mark.deib...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Seeking for professional training help with CouchDB
Date Tue, 12 Nov 2013 20:45:15 GMT
@Giovanni: _No one_ called you an idiot.

Training by a qualified expert training is very, very, veeeeeeery valuable
and nearly always worth every penny you pay for it. The question was
disrespectful to the experts here (I'm not one of them), in that you
dismiss his _years_ of study and hard work by asking how his paid training
could be any better than some googling, reading wikis and blogs.

Perhaps I didn't understand your question or just misread the tone. If so,
I'm sorry about that. But the above still stands.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 3:03 PM, Andrew Woodcock
<andywoodcock11@gmail.com>wrote:

> Don't knock it Matt, I became a social media expert this morning and all I
> had to do was add the term to my LinkedIn profile ... much easier than
> actually acquiring expertise ...
>
> On 12 Nov 2013, at 19:55, matt j. sorenson wrote:
>
> > On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 1:49 PM, Giovanni P <fiatjaf@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Of course experience has value. I'll never deny it. The problem was that
> >> the term "expert" states something about "knowing more", not "having
> more
> >> experience. Ok, these points are blurry and confusing, but that was
> part of
> >> my question.
> >>
> >
> > Good point, I would agree with you there. "Expert", the term itself and
> > it's connotations, I have never cared for. Particularly self-labeled
> > "experts". Self-labeled "social media experts" reinforces my position :)
> >
> > I prefer "striving for mastery" over "becoming an expert". I think it's a
> > subtle but significant difference.
> >
> > --matt
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >> Thanks everybody.
>
>

Mime
  • Unnamed multipart/alternative (inline, None, 0 bytes)
View raw message