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From Ryan Ramage <ryan.ram...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Online-Offline URL strategy
Date Sat, 12 Mar 2011 15:32:24 GMT
Thanks for the ideas! Although they would work, I am not sure that
editing a users hosts file is a good practice or asking them to change
their dns to use  an installed dns on their machine.

In my app, the url the user interacts with *are* html pages, at least
for now, so I think I might switch my approach and use the offline
html5 spec.
I will cache the css and html and based on if they are online or not,
I will use jquery couch lib to either connect to a local or remote
couch. The local couch will have to have jsonp on.







On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:22 PM, Nitin Borwankar <nborwankar@fastmail.fm> wrote:
> You may need to run a skeleton DNS server on localhost which understands your address
allocations.
>
> Nitin
>
> Sent from my mobile Internet device
>
>
> On Mar 11, 2011, at 2:10 PM, Joe Freeman <joe.freeman@bitroot.com> wrote:
>
>> How about you just always send the user to the local instance if they
>> have couch installed by putting '127.0.0.1 app.com' in /etc/hosts (or
>> similar). Then you don't have to worry about the 'remote'/'local'
>> subdomain. Anyone that doesn't have couch installed (and hence doesn't
>> have the customised /etc/hosts) will get directed to the remote
>> instance.
>>
>> The only problem is that users with couch installed locally won't be
>> able to access the remote couch directly (on the 'app.com' domain),
>> but if you can rely on couch syncing the databases, is this even a
>> problem?
>>
>> (Obviously you can't setup the replication using the 'app.com' domain,
>> as the local instance would end up syncing with itself?)
>>
>> Does that help?
>>
>>
>> On 10 March 2011 19:16, Ryan Ramage <ryan.ramage@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Ok, this maybe slightly off-topic for couch, but since it is the
>>> garden path couch has led me down for the design of my app, I am sure
>>> others here will have an opinion.
>>>
>>>
>>> Here is what I have:
>>> On a users machine, they have a local couch instance. It syncs up with
>>> a hosted couch. Here are some 'example urls'
>>>
>>> http://local.app.com/db/doc
>>> http://remote.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>> (I have an A record dns entry  local.app.com -> localhost)
>>>
>>> Here is what I want:
>>> I want URLs that will failover to either the local or remote depending
>>> on what is available.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Situation 1.
>>> So lets say I am ROAMING with no inet connection. I open a  word
>>> document on my local machine, which contains the link:
>>>
>>> http://remote.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>> When I click on the link, would there be a way that it get redirected
>>> to http://local.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Situation 2.
>>> Someone has emailed me a word doc, and I have no couch locally. I open
>>> a url in the doc:
>>>
>>>  http://local.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>> Since I have no couch locally, could they be redirected to
>>> http://remote.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Situation 3
>>> So lets say I am ROAMING, BUT HAVE inet connection. I open a  word
>>> document on my local machine, which contains the link:
>>>
>>> http://remote.app.com/db/doc
>>>
>>> When I click on the link, would there be a way that it get redirected
>>> to http://local.app.com/db/doc
>>> This way the fastest copy will be used.
>>>
>>>
>>> My Initial idea (untested)
>>> I was thinking about having the following DNS entries:
>>>
>>> local.app.com   IN      A       localhost            300s    
  (5m)
>>> local.app.com   IN      A       74.74.74.74    300s     (5m)
>>> remote.app.com IN       A       74.74.74.74    300s     (5m)
>>> remote.app.com IN       A       localhost            300s      
(5m)
>>>
>>>
>>> Would that even work? I am not sure how a browser (or other client)
>>> takes the order or A records. Also, when offline, and no real dns is
>>> available, would there be a cached copy so at least
>>> it would resolve to localhost?
>>>
>>> So the discussion is about keeping, nice, world friendly URLs that
>>> might please Tim Berners-Lee, and also having the local/remote copies.
>>>
>>> Any thoughts?
>>> Ryan
>>>
>

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