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From Prasanna Santhanam <...@apache.org>
Subject Re: [DISCUSS] Email etiquette CC or not CC
Date Thu, 17 Jan 2013 08:38:45 GMT
On Thu, Jan 17, 2013 at 07:06:01AM +0530, Sheng Yang wrote:
> On Wed, Jan 16, 2013 at 5:01 PM, Kelcey Damage (BT)
> <kelcey@backbonetechnology.com> wrote:
> > My position is the same as Joe, judicious email filters.
> >
> > TBH I would like a copy of everything to go to the list. If certain people
> > want to CC above and beyond that, I think it's ok. We really need to keep
> > the archival working.
> 
> I believe archival would still working well. e.g. http://lkml.org/
> 
> I know you're talking about offline discussion, but it's depends on
> people, not on this mechanism. The people who want to do offline would
> still do offline, even with current mailing list policy.
> 
> I believe the people in community should have such sense to try best
> to prevent offline discussion.

(Warning: pedantic and long. Holding on hard to my community hat)

I agree with Sheng. I was thinking about this last night and I think
the way one is used to working in a corporate environment can warp the
way one functions in a community.

I'd like to explain: In a corporate work style email trickles down
with additional participants added until it reaches the person
actually doing the implementation. This happens in the top-down
order of the hierarchy. In a flat community this will not happen.

With everything going to a list it gets daunting to keep track for
someone used to seeing much less email in their day. Suddenly you are
seeing all discussion that would have been filtered had it been done
in aforementioned style. So the reaction to this - create filters in
an email client (like Outlook) with your default-view folder being the
mails addressed directly/Cc-ed to you. So the proposal to Cc someone
when a thread needs their attention on community will help to an
extent.  

Now those who have these filters for cs-dev and cs-users won't see
this email or this thread (unless Cced :)), but if they did, they will
notice they have tons of unread email to date in these buckets. And on
a bright and sunny afternoon you're just going to purge everything in
there. So we've already lost the point of archiving, indexing and
building a knowledge base.

One possible solution:
---------------------
If you're primarily employed to work on cloudstack and this is the
case for bulk of this community then I suggest switching the default
view of your mail client to cs-dev. 

You don't _have_ to read and respond to everything. That results in
too much noise and cause much ire. By sharing the email load in
the community and responding to things one may/or would-like-to be
responsible for is a great way to participate and move things forward.
That also prevents burdening your superiors to watch for everything
that might interest you. "Representational-work-transfer impedes your
path to being a valued contributor to the project". :)

As a community we are responsible for the volume we generate and we
are treading the thin line of keeping things relevant and coherent.

Let's please maintain good email hygiene:

0) read the email guidelines of the project
1) discreetly copy folks when response is slow
2) avoid fwd-ing large conversations. try summarizing
3) don't set auto-reply responders on your client for mailing lists
4) don't send out one liners copy-pasted in multiple emails to the
entire community when directed at individuals.
5) [DISCUSS] threads masquerading as discussion without content but
just outgoing links are not really going to engage people to provide
feedback.
6) don't Cc me :)

Hope we can simplify this for everyone.

-- 
Prasanna.,

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