Some background on the read and write paths, some of the extra details are a little out of date but mostly correct in 1.2

http://www.slideshare.net/aaronmorton/cassandra-community-webinar-introduction-to-apache-cassandra-12-20353118/40
http://thelastpickle.com/2011/04/28/Forces-of-Write-and-Read/
http://thelastpickle.com/2011/07/04/Cassandra-Query-Plans/

Cheers

-----------------
Aaron Morton
Cassandra Consultant
New Zealand

@aaronmorton
http://www.thelastpickle.com

On 7/08/2013, at 9:07 PM, Michał Michalski <michalm@opera.com> wrote:

I'm not sure how accurate it is (it's from 2011, one of its sources is from 2010), but I'm pretty sure it's more or less OK:

http://blog.csdn.net/firecoder/article/details/7019435

M.

W dniu 07.08.2013 10:34, Nikolay Mihaylov pisze:
thanks

It will use the Index Sample (RAM) first, then it will use "full" Index
(disk) and finally it will read data from SSTable (disk). There's no such
thing like "collision" in this case.

so it still have 2 seeks :)

where I can see the internal structure of the sstable i tried to find it
documented but was unable to find anything ?




On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 11:27 AM, Michał Michalski <michalm@opera.com> wrote:


 2. when cassandra lookups a key in sstable (assuming bloom-filter and
other
"stuff" failed, also assuming the key is located in this single sstable),
cassandra DO NOT USE sequential I/O. "She" probably will read the
hash-table slot or similar structure, then cassandra will do another disk
seek in order to get the value (and probably the key). Also probably there
will need another seek, if there is key collision there will need
additional seeks.


It will use the Index Sample (RAM) first, then it will use "full" Index
(disk) and finally it will read data from SSTable (disk). There's no such
thing like "collision" in this case.


 3. once the data (e.g. the row) is located, a sequential read for entire
row will occur. (Once again I assume there is single well compacted
sstable). Also if disk is not fragmented, the data will be placed on disk
sectors one after the other.


Yes, this is how I understand it too.

M.