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From Jon Haddad <...@jonhaddad.com>
Subject Re: Custom commands in cassandra
Date Thu, 15 Aug 2013 04:42:50 GMT
Aside from the problems mentioned below, it's a rare case that tightly coupling your application
code directly into your database makes it easier to maintain your codebase, especially as
you scale.

If you roll out your custom Cassandra application, then decide you need search, will you also
embed elastic search?  What if you want to use something that's not written in Java?

Communication protocols were written for a reason.

Jon

On Aug 14, 2013, at 7:51 PM, Aaron Morton <aaron@thelastpickle.com> wrote:

>> They also stuck themselves on Cassandra 0.7 forever.
> To reinforce that point, look at the data stax site or the last conference for some of
the performance metrics comparing 1.2 to 1.0 and before. 
> 
> While you are worrying about the transport to cassandra, the project making things go
faster. IMHO you will get more value for money ensuring you have timely access to the work
other people do.  
> 
> Cheers
> 
> -----------------
> Aaron Morton
> Cassandra Consultant
> New Zealand
> 
> @aaronmorton
> http://www.thelastpickle.com
> 
> On 13/08/2013, at 12:12 PM, Robert Coli <rcoli@eventbrite.com> wrote:
> 
>> On Mon, Jul 29, 2013 at 12:42 PM, Nulik Nol <nuliknol@gmail.com> wrote:
>> > Embedding the server will add *a lot* of complexity.
>> 
>> that's a conjecture one would come at first sight, but if you analyze
>> it , it is the opposite. Complexity increases with code, and
>> communication between processes (like via socket or memory buffer)
>> implies more code, so if you embed and call server objects directly,
>> your code will be simpler.
>> 
>> Leaving aside the somewhat nonsensical result of applying this thinking to computing
in general...
>> 
>> ... have you ever spoken with someone who has maintained such a large patchset to
a database?
>> 
>> The people I spoke with at the Cassandra Summit who had forked Cassandra 0.7 so that
they could remove thrift and get maximum performance from their patched version did in fact
get improved performance. They also stuck themselves on Cassandra 0.7 forever.
>> 
>> Complexity is not just measured in lines of code, it derives in part from the maintainability
of any given solution. In the open source world, this means being able to rebase your forked
project to track/merge with upstream.
>> 
>> =Rob
>> 
> 


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