As Jonathan Ellis points out one might use common-pool

If you also use Spring it makes it very easy to configure, so there are no need to code it yourself.
Here is an example

    <bean id="cassandraClient" class="org.springframework.aop.framework.ProxyFactoryBean">
        <property name="targetSource" ref="poolCassandraClient"/>
    </bean>

    <bean id="poolCassandraClient" class="org.springframework.aop.target.CommonsPoolTargetSource">
        <property name="targetBeanName" value="cassandraClientTarget"/>
        <property name="maxSize" value="50"/>
    </bean>

Where "cassandraClientTarget" is bean id of your Cassandra client class, the one you'd like to pool.

P.S. You need to have commons-pool.jar and spring.jar (or equivalents) in your classpath


On Sat, Oct 3, 2009 at 4:34 PM, Mark McBride <mark.mcbride@gmail.com> wrote:
If you're looking for a concrete example, you can probably
transliterate the Scala example in Cassidy
(http://github.com/viktorklang/Cassidy), which uses commons pooling.
Or you could use Cassidy and get pooling for free.

  ---Mark

On Sat, Oct 3, 2009 at 6:31 AM, Jonathan Ellis <jbellis@gmail.com> wrote:
> It would be pretty easy to create one with
> http://commons.apache.org/pool/.  If your number of ops-per-connection
> is already high then pooling is a lower priority.
>
> On Sat, Oct 3, 2009 at 5:46 AM, Johannes Schaback
> <johannes.schaback@visual-meta.com> wrote:
>> Hi!
>>
>> Just a quick question out of curiosity; is it necessary/sesnsible to
>> use a connection pool if a larger number of clients want to connect to
>> the same node? If yes, does Cassandra/thrift maybe already have a
>> connection pool that I am unaware of?
>>
>> I found lazyboys Python Wrapper for Cassandra which includes a
>> connection pool, but I am wondering if there exists something similar
>> for the Java world.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Johannes
>>
>