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From Emir Ibrahimbegovic <emir.ibrahimbego...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: [users@httpd] Response headers set by apache
Date Mon, 01 Jun 2015 18:18:43 GMT
One more thing,

You might also look for the string 786297600 somewhere in configurations or
your webapp, because that is the seconds since the epoch that would result
in December 1st, 1994, 16:00 GMT. Is it always exactly the same value? - Yes
it's always the same value

On Mon, Jun 1, 2015 at 2:03 PM, Emir Ibrahimbegovic <
emir.ibrahimbegovic@gmail.com> wrote:

> Thanks Rainer for the tips. Here is the follow up.
>
> 1. Added  "&quot;%{Expires}o&quot;" to logging valve pattern in the
> server.xml, sets the correct headers expires on the webserver side, doesn't
> set the 1994 year one. But still when I look at the browser, the double
> header appear the one from 1994 and the one generate correctly by webserver.
>
> 2. Mod_jk log, I turned on the trace as you suggested. And It was a bit
> hard to read, really many information come out of it, but I found out for
> my css file, the correct header expires value arrives from my server and
> not the one from 1994.
>
> So it seems pretty sure that the issue is now on the apache side, as the
> tomact appserver seems to be showing the right response headers in both
> cases.
>
> I searched for the string  786297600 in my apache webserver directory,
> and I had no success with the search, didn't find anything. This is how I
> looked:
>
> grep -r '786297600' .
> grep -r '786297600' *
>
> In the meantime I've found a working solution. But it's not a really great
> one. In my apache config, in the VirtualHost section I have this :
>
> Header always unset Cache-Control
> Header always unset Expires
>
> So when I do this, only the one Expires header set by the webserver (the
> right one) is left when I inspect the response. This even further adds the
> suspicion of the expires response header being set by the apache webserver.
>
> This above works but it's not a great, because the mod_headers has no
> concept of the types (as far as I know). And I want to cache only static
> files.
>
> So my question is what to do next? I mean what would you do, it's really
> interesting and confusing at the same time.
> Is it possible that this is a bug on the webserver (unlikely) but still
> what to do next? I'm really out of ideas, this is the day 3 of staring at
> the console and logs.
>
> Thanks,
> Emir
>
> On Sat, May 30, 2015 at 7:45 AM, Rainer Jung <rainer.jung@kippdata.de>
> wrote:
>
>> Am 30.05.2015 um 02:26 schrieb Emir Ibrahimbegovic:
>>
>>> I've got an app that runs on a tomcat web server, and I use mod-jk on my
>>> apache web server side.
>>>
>>> I think I've managed to configure everything to work seamlessly, I ran
>>> into issues when I wanted to cache static assets on webserver, for some
>>> reason my response headers expires is set to **1994**, these are my
>>> headers for one of the javascript files I want to server as static asset
>>> and cache it:
>>>
>>>      Accept-Ranges:bytes
>>>      Cache-Control:no-cache
>>>      Connection:Keep-Alive
>>>      Content-Encoding:gzip
>>>      Content-Type:application/javascript
>>>      Date:Fri, 29 May 2015 23:18:25 GMT
>>>      ETag:W/"604348-1432950682000"
>>>      Expires:Thu, 01 Dec 1994 16:00:00 GMT
>>>      Keep-Alive:timeout=5, max=100
>>>      Last-Modified:Fri, 29 May 2015 23:18:25 GMT
>>>      Server:Apache
>>>      Transfer-Encoding:chunked
>>>      Vary:Accept-Encoding
>>>
>>
>> Before trying to fix it I would first analyze, where the strange value
>> comes from.
>>
>> You can
>>
>> - Add "&quot;%{Expires}o&quot;" to the access log valve pattern in your
>> tomcat server.xml and check in the access log, whether the 1994 value is
>> already being sent by your webapp.
>>
>> - you can switch you JkLogLevel for a temporary test to "trace" and do a
>> single request. mod_jk will log all headers it receives from Tomcat in its
>> own log, so you can check which response headers arrive at the Apache web
>> server.
>>
>> If the wrong header originates in your webapp, first try to fix it
>> there.  Only as a last resort, try to overwrite them in the web server. If
>> you don't even find it among the ones that mod_jk logs, it must be even
>> inside your web server or between your web server and the client. The
>> Apache httpd server by itself would not use such a strange date.
>>
>> You might also look for the string 786297600 somewhere in configurations
>> or your webapp, because that is the seconds since the epoch that would
>> result in December 1st, 1994, 16:00 GMT. Is it always exactly the same
>> value?
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Rainer
>>
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>>
>

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