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From Alexandru David Constantinescu <ald...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: [users@httpd] hardware for proxy
Date Wed, 10 Sep 2008 05:58:52 GMT
solprovider@apache.org wrote:
> On Tue, Sep 9, 2008 at 9:43 AM, Alexandru David Constantinescu
> <aldavx@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: Alexandru David Constantinescu [mailto:aldavx@gmail.com]
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 3:20 AM
>>>> To: users@httpd.apache.org
>>>> Subject: [users@httpd] hardware for proxy
>>>> I plan to implement a proxy server for apache. The idea is to act like
>>>> a
>>>> firewall, proxy , load balancer and cache. It must  serve around 2000
>>>> sites. The backend servers I don't know for now how many will be, but I
>>>> am prepare to start with 2 or 3 and in case of heavy load , increase
>>>> this number. My question is what hardware do you recommend for proxy.
>>>> do
>>>>  I need fast cpu's or lots of core's. In terms of ram the things are
>>>> clear : apache need ram. Do you recommend scsi or sata disks etc ?
>>>> If someone have experience or suggestions please give me a sign.
>>>> Thanks
>> There is no SSL.
>> The sites are very active (it is a share hosting environment and this is the
>> reason why I wanna try the proxy) and beside that we plan to expand.
>> We have between 50~300 reqs/sec (depend on time of the day) with around
>> 10~20 kb/reqs and this is not the busiest server. Probably we need something
>> to hold around 5000 reqs/sec like a frontend.
> 
> 5000 reqs/sec @ 20 KB/req = 100 MB/sec = 1Gbaud.  One gigabit network
> connection might max out so you probably want two gigabit network
> connections -- standard on most rack servers.
> 
> A recent single-core CPU is probably more than enough -- proxying is
> not very processor-intensive.  Bus speed is more important than CPU
> speed.
> 
> SCSI is stable; SATA is new.  One of the SATA hard drives in our most
> recently purchased server died after a few weeks (and the RAID failed
> to rebuild.)  Everything should run in RAM if you really need
> performance so drive speed only affects start times (unless this
> server will cache too.)
> 
> 500 MB RAM is probably overkill; a new server will have at least 2 GB.
> 
> A modern desktop computer should handle the expected load (excluding
> the second network connection.)  Use that server you just bought and
> have not delivered.  Install and load test.  If you notice any
> performance problems, adjust the specs for the new server.  Start
> inexpensive.  You do not need the first server to handle future
> capacity.  When the first server slows even a little, you can move
> half the websites to another server before deciding how to build the
> ultimate system.  Then you will have real performance numbers for the
> decision.
> 
> solprovider
> 
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> 
I appreciate your answer. Now I have a point to start.
Thank you all

alex

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