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From Tyler Nally <tna...@technally.com>
Subject Re: [users@httpd] Apache With SBC DSL
Date Tue, 18 Oct 2005 23:06:24 GMT
On Tuesday 18 October 2005 05:30 pm, Michael Avila wrote:

> Sooo, I need to find out how to work with the worse case scenario - that I
> receive a dynamic non-routable IP address. How can people access my site
> with a domain name if the dynamic address keeps changing and it is a
> private network (192.0.0.0) address? My understanding is that the modem has
> the dynamic non-routable address. If a router is next and then the
> webserver, how can people reach the webserver?

I've also the same as you... but I don't have a webserver at home as
of yet setup.  The question I can't answer is .. whether the Speadstream
5100 DSL modem (I think that's what I have) will allow a web browser from
the outside world to connect upwardly into where my SBC DSL service is
provided *to* my computer.  If it won't, then no browsing of my machine
is possible... with current hardware.  If it will.. then that's sufficient 
for it to work.

I know my DynDNS host name that I've made for my machine and I can ping
it from the outside world .. so I know the machine is reachable from the
outside. My hunch is that the DSL modem is a stupid modem and does like
any regular modem in a computer would do... if traffic hits it from the
*internet* side.. it does its magic and sends it off to the customer side.
And if traffic hits the modem from the customer side... it then hands it
off to the internet side.  I'd be surprised to find out that the DSL modem
is smart/configured to block port 80 for web traffic.

Now, if the DSL modem won't allow upstream traffic, what you *might* have
to do is get a Linksys/Belkin/etc DSL internet router that you can setup
in the place of the DSL modem that SBC provides in order to forward the
"port 80" traffic that hits this device onto your machine rather than
stopping it right at the DSL entry point device.

In order for a new device to work, you still have to set it up *like* the 
DSL modem in that it'll take the parameters somewhere that'll associate your 
*home* master SBCGLOBAL.net account with your PHONE # (of DSL service) of 
the master account.  SBC uses this combination of values to allow their 
DSL modem a free connection into their systems by verifying your master 
dsl account (mine is from sbcglobal.net) with password plus a verificaton  
of what phone number is the only phone number to allow that DSL connetion

Also realize, that the standard home service only gives you 1.5 Megabits
downstream per second... down to your PC... whereas upstream (away from your
computer) isssss... I think... only 128K bits per second.  If you upgrade
to a 3 Mbits per second downstream.. you'll get almost 500K upstream.

That's why you can download to your machine so much faster than uploading
from it to another place.

That's also why, they weren't volunteering much informtion to you because
they'd rather you upgrade to SDSL with 3Mbits upstream/downstream and
five routable IP addresses.  But then.. I think that also costs $74.95
per month as well... compared to $14.95 (slower DSL) or $29.95 (faster DSL).

A much healthier connection...
-- 
Tyler Nally
tnally@technally.com

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