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From Chris Pepper <pep...@mail.reppep.com>
Subject [PATCH] Spelling, entities, and punctuation in perf-tuning.html
Date Sun, 05 Nov 2000 05:18:54 GMT
   Suggested modifications for: htdocs/manual/misc/perf-tuning.html
   Log:
     Fixed a couple misspellings, encoded some entities, and changed 
'behaviour' (British) to 'behavior' (US).


						Chris Pepper

Index: perf-tuning.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /home/cvspublic/httpd-docs-1.3/htdocs/manual/misc/perf-tuning.html,v
retrieving revision 1.21
diff -u -r1.21 perf-tuning.html
--- perf-tuning.html	2000/09/12 02:29:10	1.21
+++ perf-tuning.html	2000/11/05 05:11:18
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@
  it does some things which slow it down.

  <P>Note that this is tailored towards Apache 1.3 on Unix.  Some of it applies
-to Apache on NT.  Apache on NT has not been tuned for performance yet,
+to Apache on NT.  Apache on NT has not been tuned for performance yet;
  in fact it probably performs very poorly because NT performance requires
  a different programming model.

@@ -257,15 +257,15 @@
  	for (;;) {
  	    fd_set accept_fds;

-	    FD_ZERO (&accept_fds);
+	    FD_ZERO (&amp;accept_fds);
  	    for (i = first_socket; i &lt;= last_socket; ++i) {
-		FD_SET (i, &accept_fds);
+		FD_SET (i, &amp;accept_fds);
  	    }
-	    rc = select (last_socket+1, &accept_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL);
+	    rc = select (last_socket+1, &amp;accept_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL);
  	    if (rc &lt; 1) continue;
  	    new_connection = -1;
  	    for (i = first_socket; i &lt;= last_socket; ++i) {
-		if (FD_ISSET (i, &accept_fds)) {
+		if (FD_ISSET (i, &amp;accept_fds)) {
  		    new_connection = accept (i, NULL, NULL);
  		    if (new_connection != -1) break;
  		}
@@ -315,15 +315,15 @@
  	for (;;) {
  	    fd_set accept_fds;

-	    FD_ZERO (&accept_fds);
+	    FD_ZERO (&amp;accept_fds);
  	    for (i = first_socket; i &lt;= last_socket; ++i) {
-		FD_SET (i, &accept_fds);
+		FD_SET (i, &amp;accept_fds);
  	    }
-	    rc = select (last_socket+1, &accept_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL);
+	    rc = select (last_socket+1, &amp;accept_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL);
  	    if (rc &lt; 1) continue;
  	    new_connection = -1;
  	    for (i = first_socket; i &lt;= last_socket; ++i) {
-		if (FD_ISSET (i, &accept_fds)) {
+		if (FD_ISSET (i, &amp;accept_fds)) {
  		    new_connection = accept (i, NULL, NULL);
  		    if (new_connection != -1) break;
  		}
@@ -406,7 +406,7 @@
  about single socket servers?  In theory they shouldn't experience
  any of these same problems because all children can just block in
  <CODE>accept(2)</CODE> until a connection arrives, and no starvation
-results.  In practice this hides almost the same "spinning" behaviour
+results.  In practice this hides almost the same "spinning" behavior
  discussed above in the non-blocking solution.  The way that most TCP
  stacks are implemented, the kernel actually wakes up all processes blocked
  in <CODE>accept</CODE> when a single connection arrives.  One of those
@@ -414,7 +414,7 @@
  the kernel and go back to sleep when they discover there's no connection
  for them.  This spinning is hidden from the user-land code, but it's
  there nonetheless.  This can result in the same load-spiking wasteful
-behaviour that a non-blocking solution to the multiple sockets case can.
+behavior that a non-blocking solution to the multiple sockets case can.

  <P>For this reason we have found that many architectures behave more
  "nicely" if we serialize even the single socket case.  So this is
@@ -475,7 +475,7 @@
  	    select (s for reading, 2 second timeout);
  	    if (error) break;
  	    if (s is ready for reading) {
-		if (read (s, junk_buffer, sizeof (junk_buffer)) <= 0) {
+		if (read (s, junk_buffer, sizeof (junk_buffer)) &lt;= 0) {
  		    break;
  		}
  		/* just toss away whatever is read */
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@

  <P>Historical note:  The Linux port of Apache didn't start to use
  shared memory until version 1.2 of Apache.  This oversight resulted
-in really poor and unreliable behaviour of earlier versions of Apache
+in really poor and unreliable behavior of earlier versions of Apache
  on Linux.

  <H4><CODE>DYNAMIC_MODULE_LIMIT</CODE></H4>
@@ -721,7 +721,7 @@
  <CODE>Timeout</CODE>.

  <P>It may even be the case that <CODE>mmap</CODE> isn't
-used on your architecture, if so then defining <CODE>USE_MMAP_FILES</CODE>
+used on your architecture; if so then defining <CODE>USE_MMAP_FILES</CODE>
  and <CODE>HAVE_MMAP</CODE> might work (if it works then report back to us).

  <P>Apache does its best to avoid copying bytes around in memory.  The
@@ -753,7 +753,7 @@
  are buffered before writing.  At no time does it split a log entry
  across a <CODE>PIPE_BUF</CODE> boundary because those writes may not
  be atomic.  (<EM>i.e.</EM>, entries from multiple children could 
become mixed together).
-The code does it best to flush this buffer when a child dies.
+The code does its best to flush this buffer when a child dies.

  <P>The lingering close code causes four system calls:

@@ -857,7 +857,7 @@
  1.3 is multithreaded on NT.  There have been at least two other experimental
  implementations of threaded Apache, one using the 1.3 code base on DCE,
  and one using a custom user-level threads package and the 1.0 code base;
-neither is available publically.  There is also an experimental port of
+neither is publicly available.  There is also an experimental port of
  Apache 1.3 to <A HREF="http://www.mozilla.org/docs/refList/refNSPR/">
  Netscape's Portable Run Time</A>, which
  <A HREF="http://www.arctic.org/~dgaudet/apache/2.0/">is available</A>

-- 
Chris Pepper     | Shooting Gallery Interactive | 212 905-2200
Mac OS X Software:   <http://www.mosxsw.com/>

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