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From Joshua Slive <sl...@finance.commerce.ubc.ca>
Subject Re: cvs commit: apache-2.0/src CHANGES
Date Mon, 30 Oct 2000 20:12:01 GMT
On Mon, 30 Oct 2000 rbb@covalent.net wrote:

> 
> > Because I think there is a base-level expectation that the 
> > best place to get things FOR Apache is FROM Apache. 
> 
> That is an incorrect expectation.  The Apache group provides a web
> server.  Any modules that get added on are just that add-ons, and they
> don't belong in the base distribution.

I see your point, Ryan: it is best not to load the base distribution down
with a bunch of obscure stuff.  However, according to your criteria, we
should be axing most of the modules that go into Apache 1.3.  Things like
mod_speling, mod_rewrite, etc, could never pass this kind of test.

What are the advantages of including these things in the base
distribution: 

- They are much less likely to get abandoned.  Even if the original
maintainer goes AWOL, someone else in the apache group often picks up
maintenance.  You can't say the same for many of the modules listed on
modules.apache.org which fail to compile with 1.3.14 or just plain return
"404".

- They are much easier for users to find and install.  modules.apache.org
is a good service, but it is far from easy for users to find and install
trustworthy modules.  If the ASF ever started a really good system for
maintaining external contributions (a la freebsd ports or whatever) then
things might be different.  But at the moment, even an experienced user
would need to spend hours putting together a couple external modules.
If the question is "how do I do this", and the answer is "find,
audit, download, install, and test modules X,Y, and Z", then
Apache is a much less useful system.

Obviously, there needs to be a balance.  Modules that are only
useful for a tiny group of people don't need to go in the main
distribution.  However, I see no reason why apache shouldn't include
many good, simple modules in the base distribution.  Yes, it diverts
developers focus from the "core" features.  But it also attracts more
developers interested in "real world" features, and it makes a much more
useful application.

Joshua.


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