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From swald...@us.ibm.com
Subject Re: Funny stuff
Date Mon, 06 Mar 2000 21:46:38 GMT

IATA has stated an XML direction (vs the current EDIFACT) and there is a
lot of vendor and user participation in the Open Travel Alliance (ota.org)
so at least that's progress. However in a way this opens the whole can of
worms again (i.e. getting agreements between all the players). As you say,
the Internet is even harder because it is so much harder to police. Before
there was a finite number of airlines to deal with but now there is an
infinite number of screen scraping bottom feeders out there trying to show
schedules and fares. It's uncontrollable and taking on a life of it's own
with no real accountability that the data they are showing is in any way
accurate or even theirs to show. Kinda cool to watch.

Stu Waldron     Internet: swaldron@us.ibm.com
Tel:914-433-4781 (TL:8-293) / Fax:419-791-1494
1-800-759-8888 pin 1466514 or 1466514@skytel.com
Home E-mail swaldron@idsi.net
"Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing."
IBM, 2455 South Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601  MD P097


"David Reid" <dreid@jetnet.co.uk> on 03/06/2000 03:59:25 PM

Please respond to new-httpd@apache.org

To:   <new-httpd@apache.org>
cc:
Subject:  Re: Funny stuff



Yeah, as I work in the "industry" I know of the various things that
companies do to influence the booking systems. When it's a closed system
like that then it's a pain but when it's the internet...

XML was supposed to help with this, but how far away is that?

d.
----- Original Message -----
From: <swaldron@us.ibm.com>
To: <new-httpd@apache.org>
Sent: Monday, March 06, 2000 8:21 PM
Subject: Re: Funny stuff


>
> I can say it will only get worse. I've been working on airline
reservation
> systems for 20 years and more than half of the application logic for
simply
> displaying an aggregated (all airlines) flight schedule is dealing with a
> complex set of rules based on who is asking the question. The rules have
> been set by nearly 20 years of lawsuits in the US and the EU. Fights over
> who owns the data and which ones get those precious first slots on the
> display where 60%+ of the airlines seats are sold from. The good news was
> it created a lot of growth for TPF :-). Call it job security for
> programmers.
>
> Stu Waldron     Internet: swaldron@us.ibm.com
> Tel:914-433-4781 (TL:8-293) / Fax:419-791-1494
> 1-800-759-8888 pin 1466514 or 1466514@skytel.com
> Home E-mail swaldron@idsi.net
> "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing."
> IBM, 2455 South Road
> Poughkeepsie, NY 12601  MD P097
>
>
> "David Reid" <dreid@jetnet.co.uk> on 03/06/2000 02:58:07 PM
>
> Please respond to new-httpd@apache.org
>
> To:   <new-httpd@apache.org>
> cc:
> Subject:  Re: Funny stuff
>
>
>
> Doesn't anyone else feel that this is getting just a bit out of hand???
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <TOKILEY@aol.com>
> To: <new-httpd@apache.org>; <jim@jagunet.com>
> Sent: Monday, March 06, 2000 6:40 PM
> Subject: Re: Funny stuff
>
>
> >
> > In a message dated 00-03-06 12:55:19 EST, you write:
> >
> > > Does Apple or MS prevent
> > > people from using apple.gid or microsoft.gif or windows.gif
> > > as NAMES of GIFs?? :) :)
> >
> > Not currently... but they could if they wanted to.
> >
> > Looks like the law is coming down on the side of those
> > who consider any document or file 'sitting on the web' to
> > be covered under the 'published materials' laws. If the
> > name is accessible to the public ( such as the name of
> > an entity on a Web page ) then is considered 'published'.
> >
> > 'Deep drilldowns' and file/page names that are NOT mentioned
> > in any 'public' html document still seem to remain, in the
> > courts eyes, 'unpublished' material.
> >
> > This whole thing about 'search engines' finding 'other peoples
> > pages' is going to get nastier as the days go by. The debate
> > is being fueled by recent findings that when Joe/Jane Q. Surfer is
> > looking for something he/she won't even ask for the second page
> > of a search result. If it isn't on the first page he/she gives up.
> >
> > I have already heard that some search engines are going to start
> > charging a fee to 'prioritize' the hits which means if you have
> > the bucks you can pay them to 'bubble' all your page hits
> > to the top. Top of the list goes to the highest bidder.
> >
> > Kevin Kiley
> > CTO, Remote Communications, Inc.
> > http://www.RemoteCommunications.com
> >
>
>
>
>
>





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